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My attempt at a 3D cutting #1: 3D Cutting Board Inspired by SPALM!

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Blog entry by RetiredCoastie posted 921 days ago 17444 reads 122 times favorited 20 comments Add to Favorites Watch
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Quite awhile ago SPALM posted his project for a 3D cutting board: http://lumberjocks.com/SPalm/blog/17488 the more I followed his progress the more I wanted to build one myself and thanks to SPALM’s ripping jig and his idea I began building. Along the way I found myself in need of various clamping jigs that would make this project as easy and as accurate as possible.

The journey begins:
I built the ripping jig that Spalm built and ripped my stock with the blade set at 30 deg. using scrap stock and creeping up on the width until I had tight joints in the center of the triangle as SPALM recommends.

Once I had the ripping sled adjusted I cut the strips:

Once I had ripped all the stock (MAPEL, Chery, & WALNUT) I tried to figure how I was going to clamp them in order to get the triangle with tight fitting joints. I started with MDF and built two cawls out of laminated MDF and cut them at 30 deg. I covered a base plate and the cawls with heavy duty packing tape and then attached one cawl to the base plate with course wood screws, the other cawl will float so to speak. Once the clamping jig was built I arranged the strips in the pattern laid out by SPALM. I then taped all edges not receiving glue, applied glue with an ink roller and clamped the assembly in the jig.

Once the triangle stock was cured I cross cut the stock to the desired thickness and arranged the triangles into their correct order. I cant stress enough you must label all the pieces so you can keep them in their correct position in order to see the 3D effect.

Once I had all the pieces laid out I started working on ideas for gluing the pieces together that would be manageable and I came across CALGARYGEOFF’s version of this board and he had the solution for clamping the triangles: http://lumberjocks.com/projects/54280 With Geoff’s design I built two with minor modifications. I used 2 bolts per triangle base and I used a straight edge along one edge and only used bolts, “T” nuts and thread protectors along one side. I also added flexible cutting mat under the triangles and 3/8” cutting board material between the bolts and the triangles and I taped all triangle areas that I didn’t want glue on with blue painters tape.
Before glue up I dry fit all the pieces and any that didn’t have tight joints I sanded on a belt sander belt cut and adhered to a piece of MDF to insure a flat surface. I then glued all pieces and clamped and allowed to cure. Because of the short open time for TIGHTBOND III, I found that TIGHTBOND II EXTEND gave me the open time I needed to apply glue, assemble and get into the jig without the glue skinning before clamping. TIGHTBOND II EXTEND is FDA approved for indirect food contact but you wont find it on the bottle or their website, I had to call them and ask. You only need light to moderate clamping pressure. If you can’t close any gaps then you need to sand the mating faces more. I had 8 sections to glue.

Once all the pieces were cured I then placed them in correct order and checked for gaps and lightly flat sanded on the MDF & sand paper board. Once I had tight joints and checked all the intersecting angles I built a large clamping board using two pieces of MDF 3/4” X 24” X 24”. I then applied heavy duty packing tape to the top surface I then attached a large straight edge to one edge with bolts & “T” nuts, again heavy duty packing tape was applied. I then attached another straight edge the same way but this one has “T” nuts and bolts and nylon acorn nuts to act as clamps. Under the 8 board sections I laid down a fabric cutting mat of which glue wont stick to this either and added a 3/8” piece of plastic cutting board material to act as a cawl between the acorn nuts and the board sections to prevent denting the sections.

I also constructed a vertical clamping jig in order to insure a flat glue up. I made it with UNI-STRUT, bolts, “T” nuts, nylon acorn nuts and wooden blocks that hold the “T” nuts. This is attached through dog holes in my work bench that way it won’t have a warping effect on the board clamping jig.

Again as long as you ensure you have tight joints you only need light to moderate clamping pressure.

After the board is cured it’s off to the drum sander then the RO sander and finish. I’ll post pics once it’s sanded and oiled.

I owe a debt of Gratitude to SPALM & CALGARYGEOFF for their ideas, designs and willingness to share. Without them I would not have been able to build this project. THANKS GUYS!

-- www.thepatriotwoodworker.com Proud Supporter of Homes For Our Troops



20 comments so far

View Paul's profile

Paul

340 posts in 2185 days


#1 posted 921 days ago

I like it, glad to see you are enjoying your shop!

-- If you say 'It's good enough', it probably isn't.

View RetiredCoastie's profile

RetiredCoastie

999 posts in 1779 days


#2 posted 921 days ago

Thank you Paul! How are you and the Wife? I hope you had a Merry Christmas and a Happy New Year. I am enjoying the shop, come over if you have a chance!

-- www.thepatriotwoodworker.com Proud Supporter of Homes For Our Troops

View 3DBMe's profile

3DBMe

132 posts in 2280 days


#3 posted 921 days ago

View CalgaryGeoff's profile

CalgaryGeoff

936 posts in 1078 days


#4 posted 921 days ago

Hey Mike, by the looks of things you have a very nice shop. All the jigs will make this board a lot easier to build than my first attemp where I tried holding the pieces together by hand while the glue dried. For me that approach did not succeed. A lot of time and work goes into building it and with the jigs it’s almost possible to think of building a batch job instead of one of a kinds.

I’m going to rebuild my jig that glues the triangles together to match your design I think it will work much better than mine. I’ve enjoyed seeing the improvements and tweaks you came up with to make this board build “easier”.

Cheers

-- If you believe you can or can not do a thing, you are correct.

View RetiredCoastie's profile

RetiredCoastie

999 posts in 1779 days


#5 posted 921 days ago

Thanks Geoff! I wish my shop were bigger but I can make do. We had a water pipe break 2 years ago and we had to gut the garage so we added a few extras when we put it back together. My wife and I built the cabinets and a few extras. The heater really make a big difference.

When I first built the jig for the initial glue up I wasn’t sure how well the pieces would come out but they were very tight and only a tiny seam of glue to scrape because of the blue tape. I think I had the most fun trying to figure out all the glue ups and building the jigs.

thanks again for your ideas and help!

-- www.thepatriotwoodworker.com Proud Supporter of Homes For Our Troops

View btle310's profile

btle310

14 posts in 2156 days


#6 posted 921 days ago

Wow

I built a few cutting boards this holiday season and I had problems with the strips not being flush after glue up. I love this jig great idea.

View Betsy's profile

Betsy

2913 posts in 2492 days


#7 posted 921 days ago

Very impressive. Your blog entry is so well done I think I could make those jigs!

Thanks for sharing.

-- Like a bad penny, I keep coming back!

View SPalm's profile

SPalm

4740 posts in 2478 days


#8 posted 921 days ago

Wow!
Good job. That looks a lot less stressful than when I did it.
Those jigs should come in handy for all kinds of glue-ups.

My hat is off to you,
Steve

-- -- I'm no rocket surgeon

View sras's profile

sras

3777 posts in 1725 days


#9 posted 921 days ago

That is a first class set up! You are ready to go into production.

(Hi neighbor)

-- Steve - Impatience is Expensive

View RetiredCoastie's profile

RetiredCoastie

999 posts in 1779 days


#10 posted 921 days ago

Thanks Steve! I can imagine how stressful that had to be. The quality of your board is a testament to your skill and craftsmanship. I plane on making a few more in the near future and yes I think the jigs will come in handy for other projects. Thanks for your guidance!

-- www.thepatriotwoodworker.com Proud Supporter of Homes For Our Troops

View RetiredCoastie's profile

RetiredCoastie

999 posts in 1779 days


#11 posted 921 days ago

Howdy there neighbor and thanks! I don’t know about production but I do have at least 3 more I have to build. But first I need to finish this one and see how well it turns out.

-- www.thepatriotwoodworker.com Proud Supporter of Homes For Our Troops

View CalgaryGeoff's profile

CalgaryGeoff

936 posts in 1078 days


#12 posted 921 days ago

Mike, one more thing. Very nice looking board! It was over looked as the jigs are front stage. The last jig has me thinking NASA could likely use a few.

-- If you believe you can or can not do a thing, you are correct.

View RetiredCoastie's profile

RetiredCoastie

999 posts in 1779 days


#13 posted 921 days ago

LOL..Yep I’m not so sure the metal framework really helped that much but it was worth a try but the clamping board was definitely well worth the time to make it. Thanks! I’m hoping it will look good after I run it through the drum sander. I’m hoping to put a finish on it by Monday or Tuesday but I’ll post pics when it’s finished.

-- www.thepatriotwoodworker.com Proud Supporter of Homes For Our Troops

View RetiredCoastie's profile

RetiredCoastie

999 posts in 1779 days


#14 posted 920 days ago

Down the home stretch. I’ve trimmed the board close to the final dimension, run it through the drum sander 80 and then 100 grit then sanded 120, 150 grit with RO sander. I’ll route the edges to 30 deg and apply the first coat of oil tomorrow.

-- www.thepatriotwoodworker.com Proud Supporter of Homes For Our Troops

View RetiredCoastie's profile

RetiredCoastie

999 posts in 1779 days


#15 posted 918 days ago

Here is the completed board!

-- www.thepatriotwoodworker.com Proud Supporter of Homes For Our Troops

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