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Forum topic by WEEBLE posted 401 days ago 2527 views 0 times favorited 27 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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WEEBLE

6 posts in 403 days


401 days ago

I am an electrician by trade, but I just started wood working as a hobby. What set of tools are good to buy as a novice?


27 replies so far

View Sandra's profile

Sandra

3530 posts in 578 days


#1 posted 401 days ago

Wow, that’s a big question. I’m going to look for a thread that was on here about a month ago. Lots of opinions were offered. I think the summary could be “it depends….” Hang on and I’ll see if I can find it.

-- No, I don't want to buy the pink hammer.

View Sandra's profile

Sandra

3530 posts in 578 days


#2 posted 401 days ago

http://lumberjocks.com/topics/46165

Here it is. IMHO good advice from many of the posters.

-- No, I don't want to buy the pink hammer.

View amite's profile

amite

16 posts in 713 days


#3 posted 401 days ago

Circular saw $60. Random orbital sander $60. Electric drill $60. Jig saw $50. Chisel set $20. Router $70.

If by set of tools, you meant all-from-the-same-company, one of those $450 cordless sets like by Dewalt.

Telling us what kind of project you would like to begin with would help us give you better info.

-- "That's not a gap, it's an expansion joint!"

View helluvawreck's profile

helluvawreck

14605 posts in 1369 days


#4 posted 401 days ago

I would recommend that you start with the basic most common portable power tools and a basic set of hand tools before getting any stationary power tools. You can do a lot with these and don’t forget a simple workbench. All of this will get you by for a long while.

helluvawreck aka Charles
http://woodworkingexpo.wordpress.com

-- If a man does not keep pace with his companions, perhaps it is because he hears a different drummer. Let him step to the music which he hears, however measured or far away. Henry David Thoreau

View kizerpea's profile

kizerpea

746 posts in 870 days


#5 posted 400 days ago

$$$$$$$$ buy every tool u think u mite need…an some clamps….then more clamps….an a coffee pot…..an more clamps…..

-- IF YOUR NOT MAKING DUST...YOU ARE COLLECTING IT! SOUTH CAROLINA.

View pmayer's profile

pmayer

553 posts in 1568 days


#6 posted 400 days ago

It would help if you would provide a rough budget that you have in mind, and what type of project you would like to complete, because there are a lot of ways to do this. So, I will assume that you want to build furniture as well as some misc. odds and ends, and that you have $1000 – $1200 to invest. If that is the case, then I would say:

- Used contractor saw: $350
- Good saw blade: $70
- Router with a starter set of bits: $200
- Random orbital sander: $50
- cordless drill: (I will assume you have one of these since you are an electrician)
- 3’ – 4’ pipe clamps: $100
- various sized bar clamps: $150
- hand held jig saw: $100
- circular saw: $50
- used PC or Dewalt biscuit joiner: $75 (this will be a controversial choice, but I would encourage you to consider it.)
- glue, sandpaper, biscuits, etc.: $50

Now that all of your money is gone, you will need to save up for some wood. This will cost you much more than your tools over the years.

-- PaulMayer, http://www.vernswoodgoods.com

View Scot's profile

Scot

344 posts in 1899 days


#7 posted 399 days ago

The absolute best you can afford to buy ! Poor quality tools can be enough hassle to turn anyone off from woodworking !!

-- If the old masters had power tools, they would have used them. So get off your damn High Horse.

View Alongiron's profile

Alongiron

398 posts in 1196 days


#8 posted 399 days ago

These are all great ideas. Here is how I got started years ago. I purchased a used scroll saw and some scroll saw books because that’s where my interest was. I quickly found out that I also needed a sander so I purchased a random orbit sander. Soon I wanted to do larger pieces so I had to get some clamps. I found that some of my projects got to large for my scroll saw so I bought a bandsaw. I could not always find the right thickness of wood so I bought a thickness planer. I think you get my drift…find out where your interest is and follow a plan. These plans will guide you with the tools that you will need. Buy the highest quality tools that you can afford. Sometimes inexpensive tools or tools that are not sharp can cause injury. Using proper tools for your projects will provide you with years of 10 finger woodworking! Good luck and enjoy your new hobby safely!

-- Measure twice and cut once.....

View BigYin's profile

BigYin

219 posts in 919 days


#9 posted 399 days ago

Buy the best you can get. Quality tools will last you a lifetime but if you buy crap, you got crap.
There are highly tallented people on this site who restore planes, saws, etc and are always willing to give advice, even a couple who may sell you what you need already restored.
The list of tools you need depends on the items you wish to make. but as a starting point
Workbench – look them up all over this site.
Clamps – all you can get and then some
Teapot & kettle
Set of GOOD chisels
Stanley pre war #4 plane
Diston pre war Tennon Saw
Diston pre war 8 point crosscut Saw
Sharpening stones – get the best you will find lots of advice on this site.
and everyother woodworking tool you ever see.

-- ... Never Apologise For Being Right ...

View Acal51's profile

Acal51

19 posts in 406 days


#10 posted 399 days ago

Since he didnt say a price point and electricans may a fair wage. Id say step up to the best table saw u can get for the price u want to spend. It makes cuts fun and a joy to do. When I started WWing i had a crappy bench top saw and it made me hate the craft. Bought a new Cabinet saw and wow its SOO much better going out in the garage.

From that table saw I would make a decent router table. Router, wood and mount plate under $200. Sander anything will do the job from a walmart cheapy to a festool. Jigsaw in around $40, use that to make shapes or i used it for the longest time to pre-breakdown plywood for the table saw. Maybe a dado blade for the saw too.

Those are the basics imo, then from there just add to the collection as u feel you need the tool for the job. I would NOT get a biscuit jointer. That will end up in the trash. When a cheap dowel fixture would do the a better job at a cheaper price.

Grab some wood and start making shop furniture.

View SebringDon's profile

SebringDon

93 posts in 443 days


#11 posted 399 days ago

Buy no tool before it’s time. Decide what you want to make first, and the tools and supplies necessary to make it. Pick a bit tougher project the next time, rinse and repeat. That way you don’t end up with a bunch of stuff you’ll never need, but which was calling your name as you walked the aisles of your friendly local hardware dealer.

When I started a few months ago, I was tempted to run right out and get a table saw; it’s what everybody says you’ll need first. I’ve finished three sets of pan drawers, a TV stand, and two coat trees, my circ saw and home-made track have made every cut I’ve needed, and I’m leaning toward a nice bandsaw instead of a table saw. If I’d bought first, learned later, I’d have a big ol’ hunk of money and shop floor space tied up in a tool I still haven’t needed to use.

-- Don

View MedicKen's profile

MedicKen

1599 posts in 1965 days


#12 posted 399 days ago

Being that you are an electrician you are aware that some tools are better than others. When you began your career did you start with bottom of the barrel tools or did you buy the best you could afford? The same goes with woodworking. If you buy cheap you may get disappointed with the results and therefore not have a quality experience and give up. I would stay away from Harbor Freight, they sell crap. Craftsman at one time was good quality but no longer, at least when it comes to anything with a cord on it. Their handtools are still some of the best. I would also not look at the small table top sized table saws. They have their place but not in a shop environment as a dedicated everyday user. I would buy from a large company that has a good warranty and customer service. I know that those 2 things are hard to come by these days. Craigslist is a good place to start as well as Kijiji. If I were to start over and could not, or did not want to pay full retail, I would look at, in no particular order, Powermatic, Delta, Grizzly. They all make some good quality machines and the older ones, pre 1970 are some of the best quality machines ever made.

-- My job is to give my kids things to discuss with their therapist....medic20447@gmail.com

View Monte Pittman's profile

Monte Pittman

10838 posts in 841 days


#13 posted 399 days ago

If you’re going to use hand tools then focus on them. Otherwise a decent table saw and portable power tools, and lotsof clamps. :-)

Welcome to LumberJocks

-- Mother Nature created it, I just assemble it. - It's not ability that we often lack, but the patience to use our ability

View woodbutcherbynight's profile

woodbutcherbynight

1226 posts in 912 days


#14 posted 399 days ago

Welcome to Lumberjocks. Clamps, cannot ever have enough! As you have seen from above post opinions vary on everything. Tablesaw, or handsaw and make do, ect. etc. Everyone has a different take because woodoworking encompasses a LARGE realm of possibilities. From the guys that map out every cut and have a layout that rivals NASA engineering to those that would never consider using a powertool. In reading the above post EVERYONE of them had good solid advice so you have much to work with in making your decisions. If you want a better list add to your post and tell this group what you are thinking about making, furniture or home repair, arts and crafts stuff, traditional work ect etc.

Most important, ENJOY what you do and post your work. Look at others work and see all the possibilities avaliable. This site has some very talented and creative people. Rather than read the news each night I look through projects and just add to my list.

Gunny

-- Live to tell the stories, they sound better that way.

View Jim Finn's profile

Jim Finn

1504 posts in 1425 days


#15 posted 399 days ago

These are all great ideas. Here is how I got started years ago. I purchased a used scroll saw and some scroll saw books because that’s where my interest was. I quickly found out that I also needed a sander so I purchased a random orbit sander. Soon I wanted to do larger pieces so I had to get some clamps. I found that some of my projects got to large for my scroll saw so I bought a bandsaw. I could not always find the right thickness of wood so I bought a thickness planer. I think you get my drift…find out where your interest is and follow a plan. These plans will guide you with the tools that you will need. Buy the highest quality tools that you can afford. Sometimes inexpensive tools or tools that are not sharp can cause injury. Using proper tools for your projects will provide you with years of 10 finger woodworking! Good luck and enjoy your new hobby safely…...........................................................My experiance exactly…. Well put.

-- In God We Trust

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