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Outfeed Table with Integrated Stockroom Supply Flatmaster Drum Sander / Storage

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Blog entry by zzzzdoc posted 10-16-2013 12:18 AM 3202 reads 3 times favorited 34 comments Add to Favorites Watch

OK. Going to start a new blog here.

As some of you may know, a few years ago I built a very extensive cabinet / router table / Infeed Table / Outfeed Table for my Sawstop contractor’s saw. The blog is located here:

Sawstop Cabinet Blog

And the completed project is located here:
Sawstop and Router Cabinet / Infeed Table / Outfeed Table Project

As opposed to Tedth66’s cabinet for which he built a retractable, self-supporting outfeed table, I built one with a support leg, as I needed to provide more room for the more robust dust collection that my shop had with my 5HP cyclone.

I’ve never been that thrilled with my outfeed table, though it does work just fine. Plus, there is a ton of unused space below it, and my 2 car garage / workshop is bursting at the seams.

I’ve built a few projects lately that have been taller than the capacity of my Jet 16/32 drum sander, and so I’ve been trying to figure out a good way to deal with that situation.

Eventually, I settled on the Stockroom Supply, Flatmaster Drum Sander, which works on a totally different concept than most usual drum sanders by not having a conveyor belt, and having you push the workpiece over the sander on a table.

I bought the 24” version of the sander, which should allow me to put 2-3 different grits on the sanding drum at one time, and saving time changing sandpaper rolls.

Now it’s a relatively large unit, so I needed a flat table for it to be built into (plus the Baldor 3/4HP motor I bought to run it).

I also need some space to store some of my jigs, so I plan on building a few drawers underneath it, plus hang some equipment off the back side of it. All in all, I’m hoping it really improves the shop.

So stay tuned, and please feel free to comment as often as you like with suggestions, questions, etc.

-- Before you criticize someone, you should walk a mile in their shoes. That way, when you criticize them, you're a mile away and you have their shoes.



34 comments so far

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zzzzdoc

508 posts in 1758 days


#1 posted 10-16-2013 12:23 AM

Here’s a picture of the Stockroom Supply 24” Flatmaster, straight out of the box:

Its dust collection connects underneath at the back:

-- Before you criticize someone, you should walk a mile in their shoes. That way, when you criticize them, you're a mile away and you have their shoes.

View tedth66's profile

tedth66

458 posts in 1945 days


#2 posted 10-16-2013 01:44 AM

I can’t wait to see what you come up with here zzzzdoc. I’ll definitely be following your blog.

-- Ted

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Henndoe

29 posts in 797 days


#3 posted 10-16-2013 10:26 AM

I had the same exact sandere and absolutely loved it. I sanded for hundreds of hrs on the thing but just recently bought a delta 1632 so kinda had to sell it plus I needed a jointer. Anyway there is quite the learning curve with it and the hight it should be used at that best suites you. I put mine on a sliding platform thing that when under one of my benches and had a leg that came down on the one side. I had it up high like on my bench for a while and it was not good at all . It was very uncomfortable and awkward. I found that it worked best with the top of it at about 30 inches give or take for you. The platform was only like 18-20 high if I remember correctly.just some food for thoughtbefore you build some huge stand that isn’t great to work with it. Chad

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zzzzdoc

508 posts in 1758 days


#4 posted 10-16-2013 12:48 PM

Thanks for the info, Chad. The present outfeed table top ends at 37-1/2”, so this would be higher than yours was. The guts of the unit will be built inside the table, so that will be its final height.

It’s a relatively large unit (yes I could have bought the smaller one, but I like the idea of having several grits on at the same time when sanding small pieces like boxes), and there really isn’t anywhere else easily I could place it.

-- Before you criticize someone, you should walk a mile in their shoes. That way, when you criticize them, you're a mile away and you have their shoes.

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zzzzdoc

508 posts in 1758 days


#5 posted 10-16-2013 01:29 PM

Yeah, Ted. My outfeed table never approached the elegance of yours. The hinged top never had enough space for me to use for storage, the swing down leg really was a kludge, etc…

Time to reboot the whole piece. Of course, it’s a chicken and egg thing. Would be nice to have the outfeed table to build the outfeed table. Not nearly as bad as needing the table saw to build the table saw cabinet around it. That brings back scary memories.

-- Before you criticize someone, you should walk a mile in their shoes. That way, when you criticize them, you're a mile away and you have their shoes.

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zzzzdoc

508 posts in 1758 days


#6 posted 10-17-2013 09:49 PM

OK. A few day pause here, while I learn how to use SketchUp, and pick up some plywood.

I also want to finish making an extension fence for my router table (a task that has been annoying me for a while). Plus there is that whole day job issue.

I think that SketchUp will help me model this outfeed table, as there are a number of ducts, motor, belts, etc. that need to be accurately placed so that this works with everything.

I’ll figure out a way to post the SketchUp models as I’m going, and would love suggestions as this progresses.

-- Before you criticize someone, you should walk a mile in their shoes. That way, when you criticize them, you're a mile away and you have their shoes.

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zzzzdoc

508 posts in 1758 days


#7 posted 10-21-2013 01:59 PM

Spent all weekend feebly learning Sketchup, with varying levels of success (read – lots of mistakes and do-overs).

I have the basic idea sketched out, need to add the drawers, jig storage, dust collection ports, etc.

I’ll post the file or drawing when it’s not embarrassingly bad.

Any Sketchup experts out there? I’m taking online tutorials, and it’s real neat, but finicky.

-- Before you criticize someone, you should walk a mile in their shoes. That way, when you criticize them, you're a mile away and you have their shoes.

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zzzzdoc

508 posts in 1758 days


#8 posted 10-29-2013 02:33 AM

OK. Purchased the AmericanWoodworker.TV Beginner’s SketchUp video tutorials.

Actually quite good, though tedious. Need lots of coffee, but learning tons.

Now trying to route dust collection, and drawers through the cabinet drawings, plus figure out which jigs have to fit in which drawers.

Want to make sure I get that right, as my original outfeed table was designed to fit my miter gauge, which didn’t fit. Plus the 1” thick top was overkill.

Hopefully something more concrete to post in a few days.

At least I finished my router table extension sled, and built a quick dog bed for a neighbor who came by and asked.

-- Before you criticize someone, you should walk a mile in their shoes. That way, when you criticize them, you're a mile away and you have their shoes.

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zzzzdoc

508 posts in 1758 days


#9 posted 11-04-2013 12:57 AM

On version 64 of the Sketchup design. It’s been a painful experience, but I’m gaining on it. When I have the first tentative design finished, I’ll post a picture of it.

Hopefully the design will be finalized within the week, then on to building.

I’m going to have to order a bunch of fittings for my Nordfab DC ductwork. That will slow things down. However, I’m hoping I can improve the dust collection of the SawStop by having some dust sucked out the back of it also (my 5 HP Oneida cyclone can clearly suck more than the 6” DC hose going into the SawStop), plus add dust collection for the Flatmaster sander and a drop for a floor vacuum. Also, I need to better route the hoses for the router table / fence / disc sander, so I can hopefully kill many birds with one stone.

Oh, and taking Ted’s hint from the other blog, I’ve got far larger casters on this one than what we used on the original. Bigger is clearly better when casters are concerned.

-- Before you criticize someone, you should walk a mile in their shoes. That way, when you criticize them, you're a mile away and you have their shoes.

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zzzzdoc

508 posts in 1758 days


#10 posted 11-07-2013 03:46 PM

OK. Sketchup skills still leave quite a lot to be desired, but here’s my preliminary sketch:
This is the Front side of the outfeed table. I’ve defined front as the side which you stand on to sand material with the Flatmaster.

Now the side that sits next to the SawStop. The opening on top is to accomodate the SawStop motor:

And finally, the inside view with the Flatmaster Sander (in red) and the Baldor motor (in grey) visible.
There will be two large drawers on the right side of the unit (although I might change the middle drawers to two side-by-side drawers, with the top “drawer” a removable piece in case I need access to the Flatmaster.

The hole in the back is for a 3” dust collector hose and elbow. And the grey rectangles on the bottom are actually large casters.

I haven’t decided on the mechanism yet to level the top of the outfeed table close to the level of the SawStop top.

-- Before you criticize someone, you should walk a mile in their shoes. That way, when you criticize them, you're a mile away and you have their shoes.

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zzzzdoc

508 posts in 1758 days


#11 posted 11-18-2013 03:16 AM

OK. Enough of the Sketchup. Time to actually build something. Been incredibly busy at work, so progress will be slow.

Picked up some 3/4” plywood at the BORG, and took out the Festool track saw and table saw, router, jig saw, Kreg pocket screw set, etc.. and got to work.

Here’s a picture of the progress so far. I got the base and the front and back cut to size and screwed together with pocket screws. Didn’t see the reason to get more elaborate with joinery. After all, it is shop furniture.

Routed a 3-1/4” hole for the dust collection duct fitting on the back side of the table, and installed the shelf.

Here’s where things stand as of today:

Next I need to make the vertical support pieces, then make and laminate the top.

-- Before you criticize someone, you should walk a mile in their shoes. That way, when you criticize them, you're a mile away and you have their shoes.

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zzzzdoc

508 posts in 1758 days


#12 posted 11-22-2013 05:42 PM

OK. Making more progress, and realizing the brain farts that I had when designing it. BTW, now that I’m building it, I can’t imagine doing this without having those Sketchup drawings and dimensions. It took forever to design this on Sketchup with my meager skills, but was well worth it.

Here’s the top temporarily on, without the laminate on it:

It actually fits very well. Very small gaps around the sander, so real good news there.

Of course, there’s some bad news. First of all, some redesign is in order.
As I somehow didn’t realize, the DC hose comes out on the opposite side that I thought it did. It comes out opposite of the pulleys, and opposite of where I have the hole in the back of the outfeed table. I still want it to exit the outfeed table in the same spot, so I’ll likely just have flexible hose with a big turn. Not optimal for dust collection, but my 5HP cyclone should be able to handle the increased SP without even noticing it.

Next issue – one that I thought I’d have to address, is that there is significant sag on the middle shelf. About 3/8” deflection downward. I want to maximize storage space on the bottom drawers, and really down want to put vertical support in. I’ll try first with steel bar to reinforce it. That, in theory, should be plenty strong. I ran into the same issue with the original outfeed table and put steel bars underneath it too.

The last issues involve taking the cabinet up and down from the workbench to work on it, and to laminate the top.

It’s getting heavy (good when finished), and I can’t lift it on my own, so needing to recruit help to do that.

-- Before you criticize someone, you should walk a mile in their shoes. That way, when you criticize them, you're a mile away and you have their shoes.

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zzzzdoc

508 posts in 1758 days


#13 posted 11-24-2013 01:35 PM

Top is laminated with black formica. Didn’t have a large enough piece of melamine to use the vacuum press, so I just place absurd amounts of plywood and cans of paint stacked on top of it. I would have liked more pressure on it, but I can let it sit for a week, which should help.

Not including pictures of that. Too embarrassing.

-- Before you criticize someone, you should walk a mile in their shoes. That way, when you criticize them, you're a mile away and you have their shoes.

View tedth66's profile

tedth66

458 posts in 1945 days


#14 posted 11-24-2013 03:18 PM

hey there Alan. I thought I’d be getting notifications via email, but I guess I had to click the ‘watch’ button; not sure.

Anyway, things are looking good so far, especially the fit for your drum sander. It looks great.

One question, did you consider the dreaded motor tilt when cutting angles on the tablesaw? I remember dealing with this on my outfeed table (mainly the 45degree position). I had to cut a groove on the outfeed table top to be able to adjust to this position.

Hopefully I get updates via email now that I clicked the watch button on LJ

-- Ted

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zzzzdoc

508 posts in 1758 days


#15 posted 11-24-2013 03:27 PM

No, sadly can’t forget the “dreaded motor tilt” issue. I thought that using single 3/4” ply instead of the stacked double ply wood help. I just got a fine woodworking special issue that showed in detail improved dust collection. They suggested shortening the belt to get it to fit under an outfeed table.

I’ll find the pages for you next week. It came in a free email last week.

-- Before you criticize someone, you should walk a mile in their shoes. That way, when you criticize them, you're a mile away and you have their shoes.

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