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CNC Chevalet #1: Don't look, Patrick and Patrice! A CNC made Chevalet

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Blog entry by zombolina posted 509 days ago 1499 reads 1 time favorited 13 comments Add to Favorites Watch
no previous part Part 1 of CNC Chevalet series Part 2: Robots do my bidding »

After spending a wonderful week at the American School of French Marquetry, it’s time to build my own chevalet. How hard can it be? :-P. I purhcased the hardware and full scale plans from Patrick Edwards of ASFM, and also downloaded Shipwrght’s 3D Sketch up model that he generously made availabe on Google’s 3D warehouse.

Why build a 17th century tool that is used for traditional hand cut marquetry with a CNC machine?

1. I have a bunch of plywood to use.
2. I like the irony.
3. I know more about Sketchup and Aspire than I do about using hand tools! Hopefully this will change.
4. Seemed like a good project for the Shopbot

I picture some knitted brows from experienced woodworkers this boggling process, as seen at some of the Vetrics demos where, after a lenghty explanation of a proecess used for a simple cut, an audience member states the obvious- “Why didn’t you just use a router?” So, hopefully you all will at least find this blog entertaining!

To begin, I split up Shipwright’s model (afte making a height adjustment for me) and laid out pieces according to sheet thickness:

I made them all 2D outlines, but unfortunately could not outupt as vectors. My brilliant husband was able to import them into Rhino, then output to Illustrator as vectors, so we could then open in Corel Draw for clean up. Easy, right? :-P

Clean up took a bit of time, welding all of the paths and deleting unecessary nodes. Then I could import to Vetrics Aspire to create tool paths, and nest the shapes together. Here is the 3/4” sheet:

Will probably use the drag tool with a pen in the machine first to triple check measurements! More later…

-- Success is the ability to go from one failure to another with no loss of enthusiasm. -Winston Churchill



13 comments so far

View shipwright's profile

shipwright

4843 posts in 1399 days


#1 posted 509 days ago

That’s just too cool Sally, but I’m probably the guy in the back yelling about the router because, as you will have noticed by now, I’m not that good with Sketchup. :-)

As for Patrick, it’s kind of fun to yank his chain a bit now and then, isn’t it? :-) :-)
He’ll just shake his head and mutter something but he didn’t disown me and he won’t disown you.

Have fun.

-- Paul M ..............If God wanted us to have fiberglass boats he would have given us fiberglass trees. http://prmdesigns.com/

View shipwright's profile

shipwright

4843 posts in 1399 days


#2 posted 509 days ago

You may not be prepared to make changes after all that work but on closer inspection, I think that the column, pieces E, would be better structurally if the pieces were oriented the other way, ie: 90 degrees rotation so the the existing mortise and tenon joint at the bottom could be replaced by a full width layered finger joint like the joints in my bench. It would make the area where the arm fits into the column stronger as well IMHO.

Give it some thought. :-)

-- Paul M ..............If God wanted us to have fiberglass boats he would have given us fiberglass trees. http://prmdesigns.com/

View zombolina's profile

zombolina

18 posts in 599 days


#3 posted 509 days ago

Thanks Paul, this is exactly the reason I posted in hopes of getting helpful feedback. That makes a lot of sense and it should be an easy fix. :-)

-- Success is the ability to go from one failure to another with no loss of enthusiasm. -Winston Churchill

View stefang's profile

stefang

12592 posts in 1936 days


#4 posted 509 days ago

This should be interesting to follow.

-- Mike, an American living in Norway.

View Mathew Nedeljko's profile

Mathew Nedeljko

585 posts in 2431 days


#5 posted 509 days ago

Now there really is irony in this story, I am smiling my ass off!

Way to go Sally…use the tools that are at your disposal and that you are familiar with…I’m sure the guys in France 200 years ago would marvel at the thought.

So I guess this means that you are building your chevy with a stretcher on the bottom and not a foot as shown in Ramon?

And seriously, you can get all of the parts you need for an entire chevy out of one sheet of plywood? There are probably other sheets you have not shown, right?

-- Aim high. Ride easy. Trust God. Neale Donald Walsch

View shipwright's profile

shipwright

4843 posts in 1399 days


#6 posted 509 days ago

Mat, If I’m not mistaken pieces “B” are the foot.
Correct me if I’m wrong Sally.

-- Paul M ..............If God wanted us to have fiberglass boats he would have given us fiberglass trees. http://prmdesigns.com/

View rance's profile

rance

4125 posts in 1762 days


#7 posted 509 days ago

I love the irony of it all.

-- Backer boards, stop blocks, build oversized, and never buy a hand plane--

View Mathew Nedeljko's profile

Mathew Nedeljko

585 posts in 2431 days


#8 posted 508 days ago

Paul you are right, I typed it in reverse to what I was trying to say.

So you are building it with a foot, rather than a stretcher as shown in Ramon..

Either way it works!

-- Aim high. Ride easy. Trust God. Neale Donald Walsch

View zombolina's profile

zombolina

18 posts in 599 days


#9 posted 508 days ago

Yes Mat- it has a foot, and now I’ll be using a few sheets of ply of different thicknesses. I just showed the 3/4 sheet in progress. Made some changes today so I might get cutting tomorrow!

-- Success is the ability to go from one failure to another with no loss of enthusiasm. -Winston Churchill

View Patricelejeune's profile

Patricelejeune

227 posts in 522 days


#10 posted 500 days ago

I am not lookkkiiinnnnngggggggg,

Nicely efficient though.

-- Patrice lejeune

View apprentice's profile

apprentice

201 posts in 761 days


#11 posted 442 days ago

View apprentice's profile

apprentice

201 posts in 761 days


#12 posted 442 days ago

View apprentice's profile

apprentice

201 posts in 761 days


#13 posted 442 days ago

I have done the same in Solidworks with DXF/CNC, cutting out in 18.00mm birch plywood including all joints utilising rounded tenons, when I get a few spare quid I will get one cut out, the guy here charges 50.00 an hour running time and says it will be around one a hour out the door. One sheet of plywood is enough to make two Chevy’s.

I have changed a few things around, using a torsion armed frame like my wooden fret saws, to tension the blade instead of needing corner box comb joints to errect the saw bow as standard. The bow on my version is made from box section alloy with a bearing to guide the recip motion instead of rubbing along a wooden guide.

One other change is a vice that releases on pedal down motion, so when you stop sawing the pack stays put, so your only pushing during release, tother way around basically, when its done I will share the files for CNC.

The main column is also adjustable for height and retains a simple spring mech inside the main column for adjusting jaw pressure, and a solid rod to the vice pedal. The great thing about 3D CAD Is you can animate the model and it tells you if anything is out of line before you go to cutting.

More on things when its perfected.

-- http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qcyhgsGA6mY&feature=player_embedded

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