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Where can I find "locust" wood?

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Blog entry by you posted 442 days ago 892 reads 0 times favorited 9 comments Add to Favorites Watch

Someone suggested locust wood for porch floor; do you know what lengths this would come in and where is it purchased?



9 comments so far

View YanktonSD's profile

YanktonSD

189 posts in 1136 days


#1 posted 442 days ago

You can only find this from a local sawmill, check with your state forestry service, they usually have a listing of all the people who own saw mills it would be a good start. Or you can try some smaller locally owned lumber yards they might know. Locust is not usually available commercially.

View Don W's profile

Don W

14671 posts in 1172 days


#2 posted 442 days ago

I’ll agree it will make a good porch floor, it seems a little extreme. Cedar is commercially available, easier to work with and should outlast you. Locust is harder to come by, harder to work with and will outlast your concrete foundation.

Is there something special about the porch you’d “need” something as hard as locust. I once had a piece of dried locust take the teeth off my chainsaw.

-- Master hand plane hoarder. - http://timetestedtools.com

View crank49's profile

crank49

3343 posts in 1575 days


#3 posted 442 days ago

Usually very close to a Locust tree.
.
.
Seriously, I don’t think I’ve seen it in the form of lumber.
Folks around here (middle Tennessee) use it for fence posts because it weathers well and bugs don’t like it.
Makes me wonder if it would be a good candidate for outside furniture.
.
.
I have used it for fire wood in the past. Although it makes a lot of heat, it also soots up the chimney really fast and will cause a chimney fire if not carefully tended.

-- Michael :-{| “If you tell a big enough lie and tell it frequently enough, it will be believed.” ― A H

View Ironwing_1's profile

Ironwing_1

5 posts in 559 days


#4 posted 442 days ago

+1 on using cedar or another alternative.

Locust is really hard, heavy stuff, dulls saws fast and the trees don’t usually grow very big. Personally I’ve found the grain tends to be unstable when drying. All fine qualities in fenceposts and firewood, but not at all practical to produce or sell commercially as lumber.

The few places I’ve seen that have it stock smaller quantities for special projects. You may have trouble finding it in quantities/cost suitable for flooring. If you’re really into bug-proof wood, maybe look into some of the tropical hardwoods with the same qualities that are produced/sold exactly for your intentions. If you do, try to go with a supplier that has “sustainable forestry” certifications.

View Straightbowed's profile

Straightbowed

717 posts in 902 days


#5 posted 442 days ago

locust is extremely hard when dry, we used it for fencepost years ago and it last forever and when dry you cannot drive a nail into it, but its plentiful in ky but nobody mills it much Bagdad lumber close to louisville may have some or you can check a small sawmill

-- Stevo, work in tha city woodshop in the country

View Straightbowed's profile

Straightbowed

717 posts in 902 days


#6 posted 442 days ago

we had some big locust on our farm prolly 22 inches across but that stuff goes wild when drying your deck would have to have a strong base to start cause you would be using hyd to put the timbers in place

-- Stevo, work in tha city woodshop in the country

View ReclaimKentucky's profile

ReclaimKentucky

8 posts in 494 days


#7 posted 442 days ago

Straightbowed is right. Bagdad lumber usually has some. You can find them under “lumber” around Lexington Kentucky on Craigs List.

View lew's profile

lew

9954 posts in 2360 days


#8 posted 442 days ago

plentiful in S. PA although there is a blight that’s killing the trees.

-- Lew- Time traveler. Purveyor of the Universe's finest custom rolling pins.

View abie's profile

abie

590 posts in 2375 days


#9 posted 441 days ago

Locust ? is it not Acacia?????

In North America and Greece the term “locust” (gr. akris) was applied to the pods of the carob tree, that somehow resemble the insect. By extension many other pod carrying trees have been called “locust tree”. [1]
Check wikiipedia for more info and names

-- Bruce. a mind is like a book it is only useful when open.

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