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Craftsman/King Seeley 9x30 Lathe #1: Stand finished and first turning

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Blog entry by Rick M. posted 03-30-2013 03:33 AM 3130 reads 1 time favorited 15 comments Add to Favorites Watch
no previous part Part 1 of Craftsman/King Seeley 9x30 Lathe series Part 2: Shop made disc sander lathe attachment »

I happened across this Craftsman lathe, the previous owner hated it and wanted $50 for it so I took it home. It came with a 2×4 stand, 1/3HP motor, 2 faceplates, a spur drive and cup center. First thing I did was disassemble, clean, and reassemble everything. Some things had been put together wrong; the drive pulley was in the wrong place so the indexing pin wouldn’t engage and the tailstock handwheel would move in and out instead of the ram. The bearings seemed fine out of the machine but kept binding just a tad after installation. I soaked them in oil and that fixed it meaning they will need to be replaced soon but are okay for now.

Original motor and lathe w/ faceplate

Spur drive and test turning

I disassembled the original 2×4 stand which was too long and wide and rebuilt it. It might not be pretty but it’s solid.

Control box I made for a 1.5HP DC motor that I previously used with my Goodell Pratt lathe. The switchplate is a bit garish but if I forget that down is off <g> this will remind me.

Hopefully soon I’ll get around to making a disc tachometer so I’ll know what speeds I’m running.

-- http://thewoodknack.blogspot.com/



15 comments so far

View Hammerthumb's profile

Hammerthumb

1500 posts in 728 days


#1 posted 03-30-2013 05:54 AM

Cool tool. I never had an old one like that. I bought a Delta about 10 years ago. The only lathe I have ever owned. I use it mostly for furniture parts, stair post, and spindles. Hope you have fun with it.

-- Paul, Las Vegas

View oldnovice's profile

oldnovice

3872 posts in 2121 days


#2 posted 03-30-2013 06:03 AM

I used to I’ve in the town where King Seely Thermos was located and where they made water coolers. I just can’t image them making anything like a lathe.

This one you got looks really well made … old but well made!

-- "I never met a board I didn't like!"

View JoeinGa's profile

JoeinGa

3699 posts in 760 days


#3 posted 03-30-2013 11:09 AM

This is what, the third one you’ve done? Is that the motor that you took out of a treadmill? And yep, it looks like it WILL be good to go for another 50 – 60 years.
Nice job on the rehab.

-- Perform A Random Act Of Kindness Today ... Pay It Forward

View Oldtool's profile

Oldtool

1923 posts in 944 days


#4 posted 03-30-2013 03:00 PM

Nice setup, great restoration.
Want to know your speed?, you might want to consider one of these: http://www.harborfreight.com/digital-contact-tachometer-66400.html

I got one for my lathe, works pretty good for me.

Enjoy the new lathe setup.

-- "I am a firm believer in the people. If given the truth, they can be depended upon to meet any national crisis. The point is to bring them the real facts." - Abraham Lincoln

View Ken90712's profile

Ken90712

15337 posts in 1942 days


#5 posted 03-30-2013 03:07 PM

Old school how cool!!! seems you got it working nicely! I love the the switch plate with the red and green that is funny, but pratical.

-- Ken, "Everyday above ground is a good day!"

View Rick M.'s profile

Rick M.

4509 posts in 1133 days


#6 posted 03-30-2013 05:14 PM

Joe, this is only 2nd lathe rehab. The Goodell Pratt is due for a repaint once it warms up.

Old Novice, the fit and finish of this lathe was really poor. The castings are all rough except inside the headstock. The tool rest holder would barely slide, it’s no wonder the previous owner hated it, but five minutes with a file and it glides the way it should have out of the factory. The tailstock handwheel was full of flashing and wouldn’t fit properly, again with a file and it works the way it should have. I’ve come to believe the crooked tool rest is also a factory failure because I doubt anyone used this lathe enough to wear it down. It’s not a bad lathe by any stretch, well made, but unfinished.

I’d like to try this low tech strobe tachometer, like we used on turntables. It’s a disc calibrated so that under fluorescent light you can tell the speed. You just print one on a disc label and stick it to a cd-rom and mount to the lathe. I have several from the net covering speeds up to 7200 rpm.

-- http://thewoodknack.blogspot.com/

View REO's profile

REO

670 posts in 827 days


#7 posted 03-30-2013 09:09 PM

hey that strobe trick is realy neat! you have done a wonderful job on the lathe(s). You will have a great time with these. The tools don’t make the craftsman. A craftsman knows what his tools are capable of and with your projects you certainly know your tools!looking forward to seeing more of your projects.

View stefang's profile

stefang

13633 posts in 2087 days


#8 posted 03-30-2013 10:10 PM

The lathe looks surprisingly well made. You did a great job improving it too. It sounded like you might be needing those headstock bearings in the not to distant future, but I think you will get as many years out of it as you wish.

-- Mike, an American living in Norway.

View oldnovice's profile

oldnovice

3872 posts in 2121 days


#9 posted 03-31-2013 12:00 AM

Boy Rick that strobe disk really takes me back!

When I was in high school and junior college I worked as a TV repair technician and each of the technicians had our his aluminum strobe disk and tone arm force gauge. I still have the force gauge but the strobe disk disappeared some time ago.

Thanks for bringing back some good memories … customers who thought that these things, along with a degaussing coils, were “black magic” and not real technology.

Remember, one fluorescent source only!

-- "I never met a board I didn't like!"

View Rick M.'s profile

Rick M.

4509 posts in 1133 days


#10 posted 03-31-2013 02:55 AM

Made this today for holding my tools.

The backside has a friction fit cleat to keep it in place.

-- http://thewoodknack.blogspot.com/

View stefang's profile

stefang

13633 posts in 2087 days


#11 posted 03-31-2013 10:39 AM

Great idea!

-- Mike, an American living in Norway.

View Derec's profile

Derec

77 posts in 722 days


#12 posted 03-31-2013 04:47 PM

I am jealous!

I have been looking for a lathe and this looks like a great deal! Good for you!

-- Derec

View Rick M.'s profile

Rick M.

4509 posts in 1133 days


#13 posted 04-01-2013 04:51 AM

Derec, this and my drill press (which was also a good deal), both came through a local woodworking website. I hadn’t much luck with Craigslist and ebay sellers tend to part out their lathes.

-- http://thewoodknack.blogspot.com/

View Rick M.'s profile

Rick M.

4509 posts in 1133 days


#14 posted 04-14-2013 02:19 AM

Posted another entry with a shop made disc sander attachment.

-- http://thewoodknack.blogspot.com/

View Rick M.'s profile

Rick M.

4509 posts in 1133 days


#15 posted 04-20-2013 07:24 PM

Made a strobe tachometer today and it worked well. I’ll post results and a video in a new blog entry later this evening or tomorrow.

-- http://thewoodknack.blogspot.com/

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