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Woodworkers Hand Care

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Blog entry by woodworkerscott posted 1313 days ago 1710 reads 0 times favorited 11 comments Add to Favorites Watch

The hands can take a beating when you use them constantly for your craft. A little preventative maintenance can make them go a long way. Here are some tips on how to help your hands stay healthy and function for you.
I am not in the healing arts and am no doctor. These are suggestions that work for me and I thought I would pass the information on to you. Be sure to check with your doctor or dermatologist for any medical advice.

You will notice that my hands are in great shape. No major injuries, never cut anything off! Take care of your hands just like you would your eyes….protect them.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=39y-VsojPGY

Copyright Starkey Woodwrights

Even though gloves were mentioned for only a few seconds at the end of the video someone just had to make a big deal about it. Here is my response:

First of all in the video I explained that they should be tight fitting gloves (but still comfortable). “Mechanics” gloves as they refer to them are quite safe, as shown in the video. Not regular work gloves, “mechanic” type gloves. Here is why they are safe….

1. If worn right they will not get caught in machinery. If they would, the bare hand would have been doomed anyway. If you wear the correct type of gloves, they won’t get grabbed by machinery.
2. If they are so unsafe, why do millions of mechanics, body shop people, woodworkers, grindermen……They all wear the without incident and are exposed to as many or more dangers than a woodworker.
3. OSHA approves of the wearing of them.

If your glove gets caught by machinery you are using the machinery unsafely and probably have the wrong gloves on. Be safe.

Think about it….they area called “mechanics gloves” for a reason. If a mechanic can wear them safely, and they do, then so can a woodworker.

Thanks for viewing!

-- " 'woodworker'.....it's a good word, an honest word." - Sam Maloof



11 comments so far

View lilredweldingrod's profile

lilredweldingrod

2495 posts in 1731 days


#1 posted 1313 days ago

WWscot, I h d to go check my cabinet to make sure you had not been there. lol I’ve used the Bag Balm ever since I was a kid milking cows back in Arkansas. I can’t remember a time that there has not been a can in my shop. (Welders love it too) Thanks for sharing. Maybe the younger woodworkers will pick up on this and reap the same benefits you and I have.
BTW If you have dry cracked heels put this on liberally and slip on a pair of socks at night. In no time your feet will look and feel as good as your hands. Great stuff.

View tomcat's profile

tomcat

23 posts in 1683 days


#2 posted 1312 days ago

Known about this stuff since I was a kid. My Dad had Bag Balm in his med cabinet in the dairy barn, and worked wonders.

-- Tom, Northwest Wisconsin

View NH_Hermit's profile

NH_Hermit

384 posts in 1720 days


#3 posted 1312 days ago

Yup, Bag Balm’s been in my family for generations, since my grandfather’s Nebraska farm. They are located in northern Vermont a few miles from my place in northern New Hampshire. I remember hearing they attempted to update the design of their can but sales dropped, so they went back to the origiinal design.

How’s life in the middle earth? Hope it’s warmer than here.

-- John from Horse Shoe

View hObOmOnk's profile

hObOmOnk

1380 posts in 2752 days


#4 posted 1312 days ago

+1 for Bag Balm.

-- 温故知新

View mfike's profile

mfike

100 posts in 2290 days


#5 posted 1311 days ago

Cool, thanks for the info. I guess I’m one of the young woodworkers because I’ve never heard of bag balm, but I’m always looking for something to keep my finger tips from cracking in the winter. I’ll have to give this a try.

View fredf's profile

fredf

495 posts in 2334 days


#6 posted 1309 days ago

Years ago I bought my wife a can— she laughed at me until her doctor recommended it :-)

-- Fred, Springfield, Ma

View bobtom's profile

bobtom

14 posts in 1682 days


#7 posted 1302 days ago

2/3RD OF THE INFO WAS GREAT…..HOWEVER, NEVER, NEVER , NEVER WEAR GLOVES WHEN WORKING AROUND MACHINERY. ESPECIALLY, TABLES SAWS OR ANY EQUIPMENT THAT CAN GRAB YOUR GLOVES. WE ALL KNOW WE SHOULD USE THE BLADE GUARD BUT LETS FACE IT, LOTS OF TIME WE DO NOT. FROM PERSONAL EXPERIENCE I MUST ADD….....DO NOT WEAR GLOVES!!

-- Bob,Fort Worth Texas

View DaveTPilot's profile

DaveTPilot

270 posts in 1922 days


#8 posted 1302 days ago

That is cool info. I love hearing about old products that actually work. I also loved hearing the comments about growing up on farms and milking cows by hand. My dad grew up on a farm and I remember watching him milk a cow at on a friend’s farm when i was about 6.

I will be getting the Bag Balm and giving it a try.

-- How valuable is time to a person who spends his disparaging the beliefs of others? --David Berthelette www.pilotwoodworks.com

View woodworkerscott's profile

woodworkerscott

360 posts in 1438 days


#9 posted 1302 days ago

bobtom….... Thanks for watching. You bring up a good safety point. However, gotta disagree with you about the gloves.

First of all in the video I explained that they should be tight fitting gloves (but still comfortable). “Mechanics” gloves as they refer to them are quite safe, as shown in the video. Not regular work gloves, “mechanic” type gloves. Here is why they are safe….

1. If worn right they will not get caught in machinery. If they would, the bare hand would have been doomed anyway. If you wear the correct type of gloves, they won’t get grabbed by machinery.
2. If they are so unsafe, why do millions of mechanics, body shop people, woodworkers, grindermen…...They all wear the without incident and are exposed to as many or more dangers than a woodworker.
3. OSHA approves of the wearing of them.

Think about it….they area called “mechanics gloves” for a reason. If a mechanic can wear them safely, and they do, then so can a woodworker.

Thanks for viewing!

-- " 'woodworker'.....it's a good word, an honest word." - Sam Maloof

View bobtom's profile

bobtom

14 posts in 1682 days


#10 posted 1302 days ago

I used to think like you concerning glove wearing. That is until my powermatic tablesaw blade caught my “Mechaincs Glove” and pulled my hand into the blade. Had I not had the gloves on I would have been cut, but my entire hand would not have been pulled in. Your statement about million of people wearing them withut incident is totally incorrect and not factual. In fact the surgeon who worked on my hand stated he saw many such accidents resulting from wearing gloves around moving machinery . To say that gloves will not get grabbed by machinery is one of the most dangerous bits of information you could give someone.
It is my belief that if you want to work on your car (mechanic) than wear the gloves. If you want to work
around moving blades keep them off. One more thing. Please stop giving out very dangerous information
unles you research it first. There are young, beginning woodworkers out there who are reading your information and I would hate to see them get hurt.

-- Bob,Fort Worth Texas

View woodworkerscott's profile

woodworkerscott

360 posts in 1438 days


#11 posted 1301 days ago

bobtom…….I am not going to get in a drawn out debate about this. Your view point is based on OPINION.

I do not give out dangerous information and you have insulted me. I am one of the few woodworking teachers in this country that has NEVER had a student have an accident in a shop! NEVER! I know safety and teach it to my students. My record speaks for itself. I have more time with machinery than you can know. I have the credentials, you don’t.

You want to disagree with me, fine, but do not take the low road and insult me and my information for the sake of saving your OPINION and ego. I did research this by the way. Unlike some people I don’t haphazardly pull crap out my ass and post it.

Truth of the matter is that even if you had not had a “mechanics” glove on you would have been hurt. You were hurt because you were careless and stubborn, as indicated by your posts. End of story.

Oh, and by the way…probably all the beginning woodworkers around here are adults; they can decide for themselves.

-- " 'woodworker'.....it's a good word, an honest word." - Sam Maloof

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