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17th Century Jacobean Oak paneled room #7: Last Post

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Blog entry by woodwkr posted 03-15-2008 11:41 PM 8070 reads 2 times favorited 9 comments Add to Favorites Watch
« Part 6: Devise an installation system Part 7 of 17th Century Jacobean Oak paneled room series no next part

The last post discussed the installation system of the panels. I have been asked how the door panels were fabricated. All three door openings were built using new frames that housed original panels. There was one original main panel assembly that the main frame was in pieces. It had been a 6 panel assembly that allowed me to use the original panels in the 3 door frame panels.

Below is a drawing of one of the door frame panel assemblys.
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Here is a plan view of the same door panel assembly.
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The door jambs were sized to fit the existing office jambs exactly – - the existing office doors were removed from the original jambs, – - skinned with white oak style and rail assemblys,- – - rehung on the new door panel assembly, – - – and door stop that was wide enough to cover the original hinge routing and finished to match the office hallway was installed.

The main panels in the room were separated vertically by a space that was covered by several column assemblys. There was a total of 12 columns that were all different widths, heights, and arrived in pieces. After figuring out what piece went to which column, all were plotted on the computer -
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The gap between the main panels also had a depth of 1 1/2”, so it was possible to pre-assemble the columns to a 3/4” X 3” strip of white oak. Below are some shots of the column assembly.

Parts ready for assy- – -
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Repair – - -
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Assembled columns – - –
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Closer view – - -
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Note the new wood at the top of the lower column panels. These were spacers that brought all of the columns to a uniform height. They would be covered by the chair rail. I assume that they originally varied in height to fit a rough wood or stone floor.

Below are some photos of the panels in process.

Wainscot panels – - -
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Main panels – - –
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Me at my bench – - – :)
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Here are CAD views of all four walls
West wall – - -
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North wall – - – this is where the fireplace was originally, – - Now a couch.
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South wall – - – Below the window is a grate that hides a heat radiator.
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East wall – - –
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The client wanted the finish to be as minimal as possible. To bring the new wood surface to a state that matched the old wood, it was lightly hand scraped and moderately wire brushed. The wire brushing wore down the soft part of the grain and made it look like green wood that is smoothed and allowed to dry. I used 5” wire brush wheels spun by a drill. [ we wore out 4 wheels and one drill. :) ] In finish, all of the original finish was cleaned, the new wood colored to match, and everything coated with shellac.

It took our shop about 1500 hours from start to job-site finish touch-up. I believe that it was bid at 1586 hrs.

Here are some shots after install, but before touch up. The flash on the camera makes the flat parts of the wood appear lighter in color than the carvings, but I am told that they really match better than that.

I have not seen them in person.

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And a couple of shots after the client had moved in.
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If I find that the client had some professional photos taken, I will post them.

Marshall

-- Marshall _ Wichita, Ks _ "Growing Old is Mandatory - - Growing Up Is Optional" :)



9 comments so far

View GaryK's profile

GaryK

10262 posts in 2734 days


#1 posted 03-16-2008 12:32 AM

That is nice. I am speechless.

-- Gary - Never pass up the opportunity to make a mistake look like you planned it that way - Tyler, TX

View Scott Bryan's profile

Scott Bryan

27251 posts in 2568 days


#2 posted 03-16-2008 05:22 AM

Wow. I have followed this all along and enjoyed it immensely. To tell the truth I could not get anything done in that office. There is simply too much wood to look at. I would find myself staring at the wood and moldings.

Marshall, thanks for the entire post. I know it was long and took a great deal of time and effort but I, for one, really appreciated seeing the project.

-- Challenges are what make life interesting; overcoming them is what makes life meaningful- Joshua Marine

View ND2ELK's profile

ND2ELK

13495 posts in 2520 days


#3 posted 03-16-2008 12:13 PM

What a beautiful master piece to be brought back for all to enjoy. Thank you for posting.

Tom

-- Mc Bridge Cabinets, Iowa

View Tony Z's profile

Tony Z

205 posts in 2536 days


#4 posted 03-16-2008 05:27 PM

Awesome post! Nice work on it.

-- Tony, Ohio

View Bill's profile

Bill

2579 posts in 2907 days


#5 posted 03-16-2008 05:57 PM

Such beautiful work. What a chore, but also a treasure for someone to enjoy for many years. Well done.

-- Bill, Turlock California, http://www.brookswoodworks.com

View Dadoo's profile

Dadoo

1776 posts in 2736 days


#6 posted 03-16-2008 09:46 PM

That was a very cool blog series. Thanx Marshall. Do you know off hand of how much your client paid for these at the auction?

-- Bob Vila would be so proud of you!

View woodwkr's profile

woodwkr

71 posts in 2513 days


#7 posted 03-16-2008 10:39 PM

Dadoo,
>Do you know off hand of how much your client paid for these at the auction?<
I believe it was somewhere around 35 – 40 grand.

-- Marshall _ Wichita, Ks _ "Growing Old is Mandatory - - Growing Up Is Optional" :)

View Dadoo's profile

Dadoo

1776 posts in 2736 days


#8 posted 03-17-2008 11:05 PM

What kind of origional pieces do you have left over that some LumberJock could turn into a box?

And hey! Thanx for the replies!

-- Bob Vila would be so proud of you!

View woodwkr's profile

woodwkr

71 posts in 2513 days


#9 posted 03-18-2008 01:04 AM

Dadoo,
>What kind of original pieces do you have left over <
Every piece of original wood that was not included in the room was was loaded up and stored in the clients climate controlled cave somewhere in Missouri. There really wasn’t that much left over.

And Thanks To Everyone for the Kind Words

-- Marshall _ Wichita, Ks _ "Growing Old is Mandatory - - Growing Up Is Optional" :)

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