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wood tick tools #7: Full size roughers

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Blog entry by woodtickgreg posted 01-08-2014 01:00 AM 667 reads 0 times favorited 6 comments Add to Favorites Watch
« Part 6: Detailer & black oxide Part 7 of wood tick tools series Part 8: Mini/midi square rougher. »

This is my absolute favorite tool of the carbide insert tools that I make, next to the hollower. This tool just flat out works! It actually makes roughing fun, you do not have to concentrate on riding a bevel or have any fear of catches. Just keep the tool rest close to the work and crank the speed up as a rough blank comes into round and balance. This thing removes material so fast that I do a no no and wear a glove on my left hand to protect it from the hot chips that was beating my hand. I never touch anything with the gloved hand and I keep it behind the rest, I DO NOT ADVISE ANYONE TO WEAR A GLOVE! The point is that it removes material in a hurry. The handle that I showed in an earlier blog was made entirely with just this one tool. If there is such a thing as a go to tool, this is it for me. It will cut straight in, right, or left. I don’t have to think about angles or riding a bevel, I don’t have to stop and sharpen, just cut and concentrate on the form and shape of the project. I use a slightly curved square cutter with this tool.
These tools are for full size lathes and are quite tough. I make them from 1/2” square stock with at least a 9” or greater tool length not counting the the shank that has been turned round so the end user can easily make a handle for it.
Here you can see how I mark and rough machine back the tool for clearance of the cutter. I hand fit each cutter to each tool so that it is right to me and my standards. I make each tool as if it was going to be mine, I don’t just say that’s good enough. You can also see how they are drilled, tapped, and counter sunk for the cutter mounting screw.

All the tools from this batch rough milled on the ends, they will be ground back for clearance of the carbide cutter.

A closer view of the rough milled end before grinding.

A batch of tools all sanded to 220 and ready to go to the black oxide coater.

Back from the black oxide coater.

How the tips look after they are all done.

The next 2 pics really show how I grind and sand back the tips under the cutter for extra clearance.

The only thing that should touch the wood is the carbide cutter.

I have an idea to improve these tools that I will do in the next batch.

-- wood tick tools for turners by woodtickgreg @ woodbarter.com



6 comments so far

View lanwater's profile

lanwater

3084 posts in 1591 days


#1 posted 01-08-2014 06:51 AM

You do care about quality. Obviously those that kind of detail takes time.
I am not a turner and don’t have a lathe yet but I am sure I will have to get one sometimes. When that happen I am going to need your tools :)

-- Abbas, Castro Valley, CA

View Rick M.'s profile (online now)

Rick M.

3977 posts in 1037 days


#2 posted 01-09-2014 06:51 AM

I got all kinds of grief from the internet for wearing a latex glove on my left hand while turning (it was in a video) but the chips flying off the carbide rougher were cutting the hell out of my hand. Then I made a plexi chip deflector that attaches with a rare earth magnet and that works pretty well.

-- |Statistics show that 100% of people bitten by a snake were close to it.|

View woodtickgreg's profile

woodtickgreg

204 posts in 1775 days


#3 posted 01-09-2014 11:06 AM

Yup I agree, wearing a glove is a no no. But I never touch anything with that gloved hand, it’s a tight fitting glove and that hand stays behind the rest. The chips come off of these tools so fast and so hot that my hand was taking a beating and getting burned from the chips. The rougher is the only tool I wear a glove with.
I DO NOT ADVISE ANYONE TO WEAR A GLOVE WHEN TURNING!

-- wood tick tools for turners by woodtickgreg @ woodbarter.com

View Rick M.'s profile (online now)

Rick M.

3977 posts in 1037 days


#4 posted 01-09-2014 06:28 PM

Have you considered making any from aluminum?

-- |Statistics show that 100% of people bitten by a snake were close to it.|

View woodtickgreg's profile

woodtickgreg

204 posts in 1775 days


#5 posted 01-09-2014 11:48 PM

Aluminum would never take the stress that steel can, it would bend and get tore up sliding along the rest. It would have to be very large in diameter or cross section to not bend and then that would make for an awkward tool. The only other materials that I sometimes use for the tool shaft is stainless steel. Just curious, why would you want an aluminum tool?

-- wood tick tools for turners by woodtickgreg @ woodbarter.com

View Rick M.'s profile (online now)

Rick M.

3977 posts in 1037 days


#6 posted 01-10-2014 05:30 PM

Better balance. My lathe doesn’t have enough torque to bend an aluminum bar, it would stall first, but you’re probably right about it getting scuffed up from the tool rest. I had thought to make one from 7075 because the steel ones I’ve made are very front heavy.

-- |Statistics show that 100% of people bitten by a snake were close to it.|

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