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Building a wooden shoulder plane #3: The mouth. Don't open wide, we are not at the dentist! (sorry Ken)

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Blog entry by Div posted 05-23-2011 10:47 PM 10718 reads 26 times favorited 22 comments Add to Favorites Watch
« Part 2: About body parts and even a mouth... Part 3 of Building a wooden shoulder plane series Part 4: Let's make us an iron! »

As I write, my blue Monday is behind me but some of my American friends are still busy dealing with theirs! Let’s get rid of the blues and go back to our project. The glue is dry and we can pop the clamps. I’ve always liked this stage of a project, that moment when you can take off the clamps and clean up the glue lines. Again, a reminder of what we want to achieve:

This is where we are. Cut the pins close to the timber and clean up the glue lines. If there is glue squeeze out inside the mortise, carefully remove with a narrow chisel. Right, time to do something about the mouth of our plane.

The opening in the bottom now needs to be continued through the 2 cheeks. Clamp the plane body tightly in your bench vise and use a fine saw to carefully cut along the lines marked on the cheeks. Only through into the hole!

Rather cut to the inside of the lines! The ramp or landing needs to nice and flat and square to the body and also in the same plane as the rest of the landing inside the body. Carefully flatten with a very sharp chisel, working diagonally along the grain with a slicing action. Keep the grain direction in mind; you don’t want to cut against the grain! It means working from the hole to the outside. We want the blade to have full contact with the landing so it won’t chatter.

So far we haven’t touched the front side of the mouth opening. The back side where the blade will be resting is nice and flat. If you’ve cut very closely to the marked lines, the blade should just be able to slide into this gap. In other words, the width of the opening is the same as the thickness of your blade. If it doesn’t want to go in don’t despair! Again use that sharp chisel and carefully remove just enough from the front side so the blade will slide in snugly.

Why all this care with the mouth? We don’t want a plane with a wide open mouth like some people I know!!

The mouth opening is IMPORTANT! I jump the gun a little to show what the deal is. This will actually only get done when the blade has been made. With the blade in the plane, the mouth opening should ideally be only the thickness of the shaving!
Note how the front face is slightly angled in relation to the blade. This is to help with clearing the shaving. Let’s use our sharpest tool (the mind) a little… Because those two yellow lines are not parallel to each other, the mouth opening will become bigger as material is removed from the sole of the plane! This will happen when you true the sole of your plane, initially and occasionally throughout its life.
If the front face has more angle, this will happen quicker. Best to have that mouth opening as small as possible initially. It is then carefully opened with a sharp chisel or, more easily with a needle file when the plane gets fine tuned.

Here is the view from the bottom.

This is a good time to chamfer the edges of that hole on both sides. I use a sharp chisel, always taking note of grain direction. Aim to have the chamfers meet in the middle, thus creating a V-shape in section. Note how the chamfer tapers to none where it meets the landing. All this is done to help with the clearing of the sweet shavings you will be making when this baby is done. You might want to wrap some sandpaper around a dowel to help smooth things out a little, just in case that chisel does not cooperate!

I trust it all makes sense to you. If something is not clear, please ask and I’ll do my best to clarify. Next we look at finally making the plane iron.

-- Div @ the bottom end of Africa. "A woodworker's sharpest tool should be his mind."



22 comments so far

View Bertha's profile

Bertha

12951 posts in 1412 days


#1 posted 05-23-2011 10:49 PM

That’s a nice even mouth. A dentist would be proud. I hope I can get that tight.

-- My dad and I built a 65 chev pick up.I killed trannys in that thing for some reason-Hog

View mafe's profile

mafe

9606 posts in 1808 days


#2 posted 05-24-2011 02:30 AM

Hi brother,
It’s looking good! That saw doesn’t speak English does it?
I think even I understand all here – think I said.
Thank you for taking your time on this I enjoy to see you in action here.

I am catching up, now at the point where the blade are made and the clamps will go off tomorrow, but now it two hours past midnight so I have to sleep (Mathilda needs breakfast and a father’s arms at seven before school).


Here a picture just before I clamp for the night, as you can see I made it low angel after all just for the testing.
Took plenty of pictures on each step while working on it, also while making the iron (It’s done), so I will make a blog also as usual.

When the blog is online I will post on your blog with a link so you can check on the student.
Best thoughts to you and all the wonderful woman around you,
Mads

-- Mad F, the fanatical rhykenologist and vintage architect. Democraticwoodworking.

View grittyroots's profile

grittyroots

53 posts in 1409 days


#3 posted 05-24-2011 03:29 AM

here’s mine. i’m still working on the shape. it’s made out of osage orange. thanks for the push into this addiction.

-- Gritty Roots i can build anything as long as i have 2 things the internet and my father-in-law

View Cher's profile

Cher

936 posts in 1812 days


#4 posted 05-24-2011 10:17 AM

Hi Div, this is an excellent blog, again I have added it to my favourites. I will make one of these one day.

Thanks again Div

-- When you know better you do better.

View mafe's profile

mafe

9606 posts in 1808 days


#5 posted 05-24-2011 01:08 PM

Looking good grittyroots!

So first two parts is blogged now from me:


The plane on top is the one you made for me Div, under comes my plane body at this stage, and finally the Plane iron.

Making the body:
http://lumberjocks.com/mafe/blog/23427
Making the plane iron:
http://lumberjocks.com/mafe/blog/23429
Making an adjustable plane iron from a spade drill:
http://lumberjocks.com/mafe/blog/23430
Best thoughts,
Mads

-- Mad F, the fanatical rhykenologist and vintage architect. Democraticwoodworking.

View Div's profile

Div

1653 posts in 1659 days


#6 posted 05-24-2011 08:26 PM

Hi Mads, that saw actually does speak English, it is a Marples! But it does have very strong Japanese ancestry…meaning, yes, I have to pull it. Recent gift from a friend who returned from the States, it is now the only tool in my shop with a plastic handle!

Re your picture, that is why we love you, always experimenting, always pushing the limits. Looks good! I will check out you blog shortly….

Grittyroots,I love it man! I think Osage orange is a very good choice. Careful of this game, impossible to make only one plane :^)

I REALLY like how my little blog is helping to inspire! I ALSO REALLY like how each maker is using the principle and coming up with his own unique version. LOVE IT, love it!! I could get addicted to this blogging thing!

-- Div @ the bottom end of Africa. "A woodworker's sharpest tool should be his mind."

View Bertha's profile

Bertha

12951 posts in 1412 days


#7 posted 05-24-2011 09:13 PM

Mads, are you going to keep the vestige of the Stanley iron curve? I’m anxiously awaiting to see whether you’ll knock it down flat or keep it as is, as a remembrance of its roots:)

-- My dad and I built a 65 chev pick up.I killed trannys in that thing for some reason-Hog

View BigTiny's profile

BigTiny

1664 posts in 1607 days


#8 posted 05-24-2011 09:18 PM

Looking good, Div!

-- The nicer the nice, the higher the price!

View mafe's profile

mafe

9606 posts in 1808 days


#9 posted 05-24-2011 10:51 PM

Hi Div, Marples (I love that name – Marples)? I could see it was not a push and the teeths seemed long and hook shaped, so I guessed Japan. But We learn new every day.
Yes I’m pushing it here, but I’m a child, and love to learn – just posted a PDF document with the solution to my problems on the low angle mouth in my blog.
I have not decided yet if I will make a new body tomorrow or fix the old, sometimes it’s better to start fresh.
(so if I have a good day tomorrow I will spend a hour or two playing, today was not a workshop day, but fine).
Bertha, sorry but this question I do not understand at all. The blade is not a Stanley.
Best thoughts,
Mads

-- Mad F, the fanatical rhykenologist and vintage architect. Democraticwoodworking.

View mafe's profile

mafe

9606 posts in 1808 days


#10 posted 05-25-2011 07:54 PM

Grrrrrrrr,
I work on three different models now, two in real progress, one dumped… My worktable is a mess and I am sure I have wild eyes and look like a mad scientist. Nothing seem to work now!

But I still try, and I still have a wonderful time as I go after new ideas.
(I might end up throwing the towel and make it bevel down!).
Yes I am a mad man I know, and you are allowed to laugh as long as you do it sweet.

Best thoughts my dear brother,
Mads

-- Mad F, the fanatical rhykenologist and vintage architect. Democraticwoodworking.

View patron's profile

patron

13142 posts in 2060 days


#11 posted 05-25-2011 08:16 PM

yuk yuk

as the three stooges would say

sometimes you are the teacher
sometimes the student

all in a life’s work

enjoy

-- david - only thru kindness can this world be whole . If we don't succeed we run the risk of failure. Dan Quayle

View mafe's profile

mafe

9606 posts in 1808 days


#12 posted 05-25-2011 08:42 PM

Do you know the song ‘I belive I can fly’?
This is how I feel now!

The answer was right under my nose.
I did it!!!
It’s making wonderful shaves,
Jubiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii
MaFe in space!!!
Best thoughts,
Mads

-- Mad F, the fanatical rhykenologist and vintage architect. Democraticwoodworking.

View mafe's profile

mafe

9606 posts in 1808 days


#13 posted 05-25-2011 08:44 PM

Yes David, and sometimes there are just a hair from giving up to the answer, and it seems impossible to go this last part.

-- Mad F, the fanatical rhykenologist and vintage architect. Democraticwoodworking.

View Div's profile

Div

1653 posts in 1659 days


#14 posted 05-25-2011 10:23 PM

Tra la la! I knew you would do it Einstein! I like your model, modern in a way, something reminds me of Japanese! Well done brother in the North. That #311 Record did shine some light, yes?
She is actually a tiny puppy, I only realize it now, when seen in comparison with the one I gave you.
What is the width?

-- Div @ the bottom end of Africa. "A woodworker's sharpest tool should be his mind."

View mafe's profile

mafe

9606 posts in 1808 days


#15 posted 05-25-2011 11:18 PM

Thank you, my face just turned red.
Yes the 311 is a world of it’s own, it is a piece of art when it comes to toolmaking, so perfect in shape and function, and then it are shoulder, bull nose and chisel plane in one – amazing.

The Record are 29mm the one you gave me is 20mm, the one I made are 15mm (not on photo) and the Veritas micro is 6mm so I have several sizes now.
The first of the big wood shoulder planes are with bullnose also, and the second is skeved.

-- Mad F, the fanatical rhykenologist and vintage architect. Democraticwoodworking.

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