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Blog entry by woodmaker posted 05-21-2012 11:02 PM 1170 reads 0 times favorited 5 comments Add to Favorites Watch

I saw this on a sawmill site and wondered how true this really is.
I can’t see building furniture or etc from green wood that is shrinking. What about cupping, twist and other things lumber does as it dries?

I’m confused!

For general construction, kiln dried lumber is not necessary. In fact many people prefer to build some of their projects out of green lumber, straight off the sawmill. It is easier to cut and nail, and as it dries, will shrink and form itself to the shape of what it is nailed to. So it will develop memory and be strong in the shape it is installed. Most people who have never built from green wood have never seen this effect. For example, hickory framing lumber is easy to work when it is green, but as it dries and hardens it gets to the point that nails can barely be pulled out without stripping their heads or breaking them in two.

Did I miss-read this somehow?

-- Mike



5 comments so far

View Granddaddy1's profile

Granddaddy1

181 posts in 955 days


#1 posted 05-22-2012 12:41 AM

The operative phrase there is “for general construction”. You wouldn’t want to use green lumber on a fine woodworking project. Green Douglas fir is very common in construction.

-- Ron Wilson - maker of fine firewood!

View Granddaddy1's profile

Granddaddy1

181 posts in 955 days


#2 posted 05-22-2012 12:41 AM

The operative phrase there is “for general construction”. You wouldn’t want to use green lumber on a fine woodworking project. Green Douglas fir is very common in construction.

-- Ron Wilson - maker of fine firewood!

View Vance100's profile

Vance100

38 posts in 1005 days


#3 posted 05-22-2012 01:04 AM

They make chair parts from green lumber.

View HalDougherty's profile

HalDougherty

1820 posts in 1991 days


#4 posted 05-22-2012 02:22 AM

Mike,

The sawmill operator is talking about building sheds and other buildings from green lumber, not furniture that’s going to be used indoors with your heat pump pulling out all the moisture. Oak, hickory, and other hardwoods are easy to drive a nail into when they are green. After they dry, you have to drill a pilot hole to get a nail through them.

-- Hal, Tennessee http://www.first285.com

View woodmaker's profile

woodmaker

270 posts in 1445 days


#5 posted 05-22-2012 04:45 PM

Wel I figured I was reading this wrong.

Thanks folks for straightning me out.

-- Mike

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