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When did lumber start having staple marks

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Blog entry by wolfie8700 posted 03-03-2018 01:49 PM 596 reads 0 times favorited 9 comments Add to Favorites Watch

Hi,
I am looking at a train bridge and the lumber on the truss has staple marks on it that I associate with being treated lumber. Can anyone tell me when those staple marks started appearing on wood?

I’ve scoured the internet, but have come up empty handed.



9 comments so far

View JADobson's profile

JADobson

1013 posts in 2077 days


#1 posted 03-03-2018 03:04 PM

There is evidence of staples being used (in stone) as early as the 6th C. BC. If they were putting them in stone I’d imagine a few went into wood as well (archaeological records for that would be understandably difficult to find)

-- No craft is very far from the line beyond which is magic. -- Lord Dunsany

View Gene Howe's profile

Gene Howe

10366 posts in 3395 days


#2 posted 03-03-2018 03:09 PM

What makes you think it’s not treated?

-- Gene 'The true soldier fights not because he hates what is in front of him, but because he loves what is behind him.' G. K. Chesterton

View Greg the Cajun Wood Artist's profile

Greg the Cajun Wood Artist

420 posts in 909 days


#3 posted 03-03-2018 04:06 PM

I would think that staple marks come from the placement of bar code indetification and ID price tags. I doubt it has anything to do with treated lumber. Many of the old train tracks and bridges used creosote soaked lumber and I don’t recall seeing any staples on them. We quite often went fishing near the train bridges over water and tied out boat to them…

-- Wood for projects is like a good Fart..."better when you cut it yourself"

View Andybb's profile

Andybb

918 posts in 570 days


#4 posted 03-03-2018 05:30 PM

All railroad ties are always treated with some really powerful preservatives as a matter of course regardless of staple marks or not. Don’t think the two are related.

-- Andy - Seattle USA

View wolfie8700's profile

wolfie8700

2 posts in 52 days


#5 posted 03-03-2018 05:30 PM

I was thinking of these types of marks.

https://goo.gl/images/LxAdBD

Did that work?

View John Smith's profile

John Smith

717 posts in 129 days


#6 posted 03-03-2018 09:06 PM

Wolfie – why not post a photo of your staple marks and how many are you talking about ?
what size is the lumber ?
as well as a photo of the wood that it is on ??
photos can go a long way for the gallery being able to provide you more accurate responses.

-- Graduated Valedictorian from the University of HardKnocks --

View Gene Howe's profile

Gene Howe

10366 posts in 3395 days


#7 posted 03-04-2018 12:17 AM



I was thinking of these types of marks.

https://goo.gl/images/LxAdBD

Did that work?

- wolfie8700


Those are the marks that I thought you were seeing. Those are often seen on treated lumber. But, some treated lumber may not have them.

-- Gene 'The true soldier fights not because he hates what is in front of him, but because he loves what is behind him.' G. K. Chesterton

View CaptainSkully's profile

CaptainSkully

1590 posts in 3525 days


#8 posted 03-04-2018 03:27 AM

Are you talking about incise marks? They’ve been around since mills starting using anti-kickback pawls since the start of the Industrial Revolution.

-- You can't control the wind, but you can trim your sails

View jimintx's profile

jimintx

765 posts in 1551 days


#9 posted 03-04-2018 06:19 AM

I was thinking of these types of marks.
https://goo.gl/images/LxAdBD ...
- wolfie8700

Those are called called incise marks. They are not from staples.
The wood surface is perforated to allow deeper penetration of the treatment chemicals.

Google incise marks on lumber, and you can read a lot of references.

-- Jim, Houston, TX

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