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The "Shed" #3: Inner Framing and Insulation Thoughts

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Blog entry by Ty Sullivan posted 11-11-2014 06:49 AM 1575 reads 0 times favorited 5 comments Add to Favorites Watch
« Part 2: Dirtwork....augh. Part 3 of The "Shed" series Part 4: Plans are meant to be changed »

This last weekend did not yield an overly fruitful progression on the microshop as the house soaked up most of my attention. I was able to start a portion of the inner framing to prep the walls for insulation and electrical placements. These types of sheds have LARGE frame centers but they’re still set on a 16” center around the perimeter. So, it is just a matter of filling in the missing sections and tying everything together. As you can tell nothing too complicated about it except I have to notch the bottoms of each and every stud but that also eliminates toe nailing them into place!

I just finished up wrapping the return air line under my house and had alot of ductwrap insulation leftover that I am now hoping to add to the roof of the shop. The R-value is low(6) but with the preinstalled bubble insulation (also about R-6) I shouldn’t feel too bad about it being there. The roof cavity/clearance is very low too and the ductwrap is roughly 48” in width so I will have less seams and hopefully a tighter air pocket overall. I guess I will know that better when I have it installed.

My fingers are crossed that this coming weekend will see the completion of the framing, required romex strung and having the subpanel setup for lighting installation. I have a few Christmas presents that need some attending to and would LOVE to have those be my first projects to leave the new microshop.



5 comments so far

View oltexasboy1's profile

oltexasboy1

240 posts in 1172 days


#1 posted 11-11-2014 04:15 PM

I noticed your thread and you can do this. I work in about half of a 12×24 one car garage. you will need to put a porch on your shop. You will need the ability to move(all my stuff is on wheels) your tools out the your way in order to work safely, without bumping into stuff. One caveat, you can’t do much if it is raining.

-- "The pursuit of perfection often yields excellence"

View Louie's profile

Louie

34 posts in 1045 days


#2 posted 11-11-2014 06:44 PM

Keep going, you’re doing great. I’ve got the same size shed that I really want to work out of. I’ll be following your blog! Did you find any online resources with pictures and layouts? The only ones I found were shops housed in utility trailers. What tools are you planning to have?

-- What I lack in skill, I make up for in putty.

View Ty Sullivan's profile

Ty Sullivan

44 posts in 853 days


#3 posted 11-16-2014 05:57 PM



I noticed your thread and you can do this. I work in about half of a 12×24 one car garage. you will need to put a porch on your shop. You will need the ability to move(all my stuff is on wheels) your tools out the your way in order to work safely, without bumping into stuff. One caveat, you can t do much if it is raining.

- oltexasboy1

I absolutely agree with the idea for the porch extending workable space. I do not have any dimensioning equipment (i.e. planer, joiner) at the moment but that would be my ideal location for these…though I’m sure my neighbors will hate it!

View Ty Sullivan's profile

Ty Sullivan

44 posts in 853 days


#4 posted 11-16-2014 06:07 PM



Keep going, you re doing great. I ve got the same size shed that I really want to work out of. I ll be following your blog! Did you find any online resources with pictures and layouts? The only ones I found were shops housed in utility trailers. What tools are you planning to have?

- TrueSquare

I have looked for months and months before getting the new shed to no avail as what others consider a “small” shop is easily double the size of what me and you are dealing with. Hence the “microshop” term. I am pretty much going to go with TONS of wall storage to avoid fighting for floor space as much as possible. I am also going to lean/wean myself towards hand tools. I have a miter, tablesaw, fixed/plunge router, circular, jig, and the other small power tools for most projects. Big dreams….small budget.

View Roger's profile

Roger

19886 posts in 2271 days


#5 posted 01-14-2016 02:23 PM

It is always fun to start off like this. Bare walls, and you can do anything you want to. I’d recommend to put in as many receptacles as you can, and maybe do one or 2 220’s for future equipment. Just a thought and my 2-cents

-- Roger from KY. Work/Play/Travel Safe. Keep your dust collector fed. Kentuk55@yahoo.com

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