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Leonard Street Workshop #3: Planning (pt 1)

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Blog entry by tyskkvinna posted 01-16-2011 05:05 PM 1100 reads 1 time favorited 30 comments Add to Favorites Watch
« Part 2: Just a little wood Part 3 of Leonard Street Workshop series Part 4: New Tool- Router Table »

Thought I would get some input from you all.

As you may or may not know, my shop is a little different from most. It is not in my home or for my personal use – it is part of our open workspace where people can come and build “stuff”. We do a LOT with science/tech but that doesn’t mean more traditional ways of “making things” are left out.. I dearly love woodworking and we have a dedicated spot getting set up for it.

Now, something that should be clear: Nobody (And I mean NOBODY! So I apologise to any LJ’s who will eventually visit my shop, but that means you too) gets to use any of the tools until they have been certified in knowing how to use them on a safe level. So there is no worry of “Gosh, I don’t think you should get a jointer because some fool who has never heard of what it does is going to put their hand through it”.

But, this IS a shop that will be used by many people. This means I need to lean towards universal tools rather than hyper-specific tools. A general example on that is…. I have a chop saw already, and it is a rather beefy Dewalt 14” one. It probably doesn’t have the crazy accuracy of some other saws, but it’s super sturdy, very easy to swap the blade, portable if necessary, etc.

So this is what we have already—

Aforementioned chop saw.
A good, solid, generic table saw.
A small army of sanders – belt, ROS, benchtop
A large army of drill presses
A 13” planer
A decent collection of hand saws (pull, hack, drywall, what-have-you)
Three or four handplanes, though I admit I’m not sure what kind they are.
A large collection of nail guns and all of the required air components (compressor, fittings, etc)

And the CNC stuff – lathe, mill, sheet router.

We had a bandsaw but it died a (literally) fiery death (through no fault of a user, we actually had a high voltage mishap)... so I’m working on getting one or two bandsaws (was thinking one vertical and one horizontal, for the metal guys)

I would like to get a router table set up and a jointer of some kind. They both seem like logical next steps. Also, I would like to get one or two wood lathes (small and large, perhaps)

What else do you think should be there?

The purpose of this shop is two-fold. 1) People who have a passing interest in something and want to try it out before they commit the money and space in their home to these tools and equipment. 2) People who have a strong interest in the field but can’t, for whatever reason, have the tools and equipment at home. A small off-shoot is 3) People who are building a larger-scope project that need a small aspect of this field in order to complete their project.

A good example for 3) would be, a group of people working on building a high voltage/electronics/audio/etc demonstration and they need to make a pretty housing for it, so they’d come to the woodshop and learn how to make a basic cabinet or box.

I’ve had other people use 2) when they just need to use a planer for a little bit because they don’t have one at home… which is fine.

——-

In other news, we’re well under way with getting the heat on in the building (it needed all new heaters, I don’t know if I mentioned that…) so pretty soon it will actually be warm enough to DO STUFF! I am excited.

-- Lis - Michigan - http://www.missmooseart.com - https://www.etsy.com/people/lisbokt



30 comments so far

View rivergirl's profile

rivergirl

3198 posts in 1590 days


#1 posted 01-16-2011 05:14 PM

Sounds fascinating. Good luck in your venture.

-- Homer : "Oh, and how is education supposed to make me feel smarter? Besides, every time I learn something new, it pushes some old stuff out of my brain."

View Servelan's profile

Servelan

39 posts in 1533 days


#2 posted 01-16-2011 05:58 PM

Definitely both kinds of bandsaws…compound miter saw would be one suggestion of something to add. Got a metal cutoff saw somewhere in that mix?

View tyskkvinna's profile

tyskkvinna

1308 posts in 1738 days


#3 posted 01-16-2011 05:59 PM

Got a metal cutoff saw somewhere in that mix?

Maybe- I’m not sure exactly what you mean?

-- Lis - Michigan - http://www.missmooseart.com - https://www.etsy.com/people/lisbokt

View D1st's profile

D1st

289 posts in 1792 days


#4 posted 01-16-2011 06:13 PM

You could use the chop saw for a metal cutoff saw, just change the blade to metal cutting. One less tool to take up space. Sounds like a cool shop and a nice warm place now. : )

-- http://www.furstwoodworks.com/

View rando1's profile

rando1

163 posts in 1676 days


#5 posted 01-16-2011 06:14 PM

Jig saw, good bench top table saw, smaller portable dust collector. couple good work benches with some good lighting is always helpful. Plenty of air and electrical outlets:)
What a great idea, I have brain stromed this idea a little in the past, wish had a group like yours to work with.
Be safe.

-- Randon Riegsecker, crosscutservices.com

View canadianchips's profile

canadianchips

1836 posts in 1749 days


#6 posted 01-16-2011 06:22 PM

A stationary disc-belt sander is always nice.
A stationary DRUM sander. 24” wide.

-- "My mission in life - make everyone smile !"

View Thos. Angle's profile

Thos. Angle

4438 posts in 2714 days


#7 posted 01-16-2011 07:18 PM

Routers, router table, shaper. Certainly a jointer. if you’re going to work metal, grinders, acetelene torch, buzz box welder

-- Thos. Angle, Jordan Valley, Oregon

View tyskkvinna's profile

tyskkvinna

1308 posts in 1738 days


#8 posted 01-16-2011 07:39 PM

You could use the chop saw for a metal cutoff saw, just change the blade to metal cutting. One less tool to take up space. Sounds like a cool shop and a nice warm place now. : )

This is where there is a big difference between a shop for one (or maybe two) people and a communal space. It is wholly impractical to require a blade change to use the chop saw for both metal and wood. It would be regularly swapped out during the day, and moved from the wood area to the metal area. Very bad. Way more sense to have two saws, and dedicate each to their own material. Shop space isn’t a big deal. Also, I don’t think the wood guys would want to wait for the metal guys to be done cutting to go get their saw back :)

Routers, router table, shaper.

Do you think there is really a need to both a router table and a shaper? I’ll admit I’ve never used a shaper.

-- Lis - Michigan - http://www.missmooseart.com - https://www.etsy.com/people/lisbokt

View CharlieM1958's profile

CharlieM1958

15816 posts in 2970 days


#9 posted 01-16-2011 07:57 PM

I would think a shaper is much more practical than a router table for making moldings.

Did anyone mention a scroll saw? How about a small metal lathe?

-- Charlie M. "Woodworking - patience = firewood"

View devann's profile

devann

1735 posts in 1445 days


#10 posted 01-16-2011 08:25 PM

There is something overlooked in the comments above. When you have a wood/metal workspace you run the risk of cross contamination. For example, I have one drill press but two tables for it. one for wood and one for metal. I sometimes need to use cutting oil drilling metal and this would ruin a wood project that had to be stained. This will apply elsewhere in your shop and does present for challenges for space and tool placement. Good Luck, and let me know if you would like to know any of the safety tips I’ve learned over the past thirty years.

-- Darrell, making more sawdust than I know what to do with

View Brian Havens's profile

Brian Havens

194 posts in 1858 days


#11 posted 01-16-2011 09:07 PM

One of the most neglected things I find when people setup shop (including me when I first setup shop) is horizontal workspace, i.e. work benches, work tables, and assembly tables. They are a must for working with hand tools and for assembling projects. Horizontal workspace is also very versatile for use with smaller tools that can be mounted to some sheet material and clamped to a work table (e.g. scrolls saws, disk sanders, etc.) . And then there is the storage underneath the tables.

Although a traditional workbench is nice to have, having work tables that facilitate using clamps will suffice. I have a traditional bench an love to use it, but Todd Clippinger has a variety of work tables and does quite well without one. Notice the large overhangs of the tops to accommodate clamping.
http://www.americancraftsmanworkshop.com/journal/2011/1/2/video-tour-of-the-american-craftsman-workshop.html

-- Brian Havens, Woodworker http://brianhavens.com

View Sheila Landry (scrollgirl)'s profile

Sheila Landry (scrollgirl)

7902 posts in 1672 days


#12 posted 01-16-2011 09:26 PM

You know I am going to suggest a scroll saw to add to your tools. :)

It is a great way to for someone starting out in woodworking, as well as other levels of woodworkers. There are so many times when building larger things that having a scroll saw can come into play and be helpful. There is a relatively easy learning curve with it too and it is a tool that many age groups can use and feel accomplished on with some supervision.

It is a wonderful and exciting venture you are involved in, Lis. It is great to see it come to be!

Thanks for showing us! Sheila

-- Designer/Artist/Teacher. Owner of Sheila Landry Designs (http://www.sheilalandrydesigns.com) Scroll saw, wood working and painting patterns and surfaces. "Knowledge is Power"

View BritBoxmaker's profile

BritBoxmaker

4448 posts in 1788 days


#13 posted 01-16-2011 11:13 PM

Well, Lis how about a drum sander. Mine has made a world of difference to finish sizing tricky cross grained wood.

-- Martyn -- Boxologist, Pattern Juggler and Candyman of the visually challenging. http://www.theartofboxes.com

View tyskkvinna's profile

tyskkvinna

1308 posts in 1738 days


#14 posted 01-16-2011 11:34 PM

I would think a shaper is much more practical than a router table for making moldings.

That makes a lot of sense. I don’t really see moldings being something we’ll deal with any time soon, though, but I’ll certainly be keeping that in my head the next time somebody mentions a shaper and why we don’t have one.

When you have a wood/metal workspace you run the risk of cross contamination.

Yeah, exactly. I alluded to that by mentioning the chop saw would have to move were it to have two different blades on it.. but yes. We already have the metal shop allotted for a different room entirely. The only area there HAS to be some cross contamination is the CNC sheet router. It does wood AND metal, but I’m very tedious about ensuring it’s been properly cleaned in the transition between materials. (It also does plastic.)

But, people who work with one often work with the other and some tools make more sense if you are doing both. (Like the horizontal bandsaw) It’s something that’s really, really important though.

You know I am going to suggest a scroll saw to add to your tools. :)

Of course!!! I should have thought of that first. :) As I know you have a great deal of experience with what makes a good scrollsaw, do you think you could offer input as to what would be a good particular one, to be used by many skill levels including absolute beginner?

Well, Lis how about a drum sander. Mine has made a world of difference to finish sizing tricky cross grained wood.

Yes, of course! I envy your drum sander quite a bit.

-- Lis - Michigan - http://www.missmooseart.com - https://www.etsy.com/people/lisbokt

View RonPeters's profile

RonPeters

708 posts in 1633 days


#15 posted 01-17-2011 02:27 AM

Has anyone mentioned a dust collector?

I sure wish you guys lived in Colorado! I’d be spending a lot of time at this shop!

-- “Once more unto the breach, dear friends...” Henry V - Act III, Scene I

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