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Now vs. Then ... ideas?

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Blog entry by tyskkvinna posted 07-01-2010 02:16 AM 1035 reads 0 times favorited 22 comments Add to Favorites Watch

You may have read Otto’s blog entry a bit ago: http://lumberjocks.com/OttoH/blog/16488

I have been working on pricing out this same list, today. In fact I am almost done. But, I found an interesting thing when I was doing it and I thought maybe you all could help me out.

A lot of the tools listed were fairly commonplace in 1935, but today are considered pretty rare. As such, they end up being dramatically more expensive (proportionally) than they should be. Also, since then, I think some items have simply been replaced by more efficient means.

So I am thinking, out of mere curiosity, what would this list look like today? For the sake of comparison, I want to keep it hand-tool centred. (So no electric planers or chop saws…) But if more cost-efficient and energy-efficient something powered is certainly not out of the question.

Hand Saw (Crosscut) 8 point, 24”
Claw Hammer, 13 oz
Smoothing plane, 9” –
Block Plane, 5 or 6”
Coping Frame
Coping Blades (assorted)
Woodworkers’ Vise, 7” Jaw
Bar Clamp Attachment
Ratchet Brace, 8” and Bits ranging from 1/4” to 3/4”
Marking Gauge
Compass Saw
Firmer Chisels -
1/4”
3/4”
1”

Gimlet
Screwdriver
Nail Set
Brad Awl
Rose Countersink
Try-Square
Universal Bevel
Knife (Paring)
3-square File
Flat file
2-ft Rule
Cabinet Scraper

Combination Oilstone
Back Saw, 12”
Rip Saw, 26”
Clamps, 2 – “Hand Screws”
“C” Clamps, 2-6”
Folding rule, 6-foot
Wooden Mallet
Wood Rasp, Half round
Expansion Bit
Screwdriver Bit
Glass Cutter
Hack Saw, 8 to 12” (For metal)
Combination Pliers
Tool Grinder
Bench Stop
Hand drill
Twist drills, 1/16” to 3/8”
Outside callipers
Gouge, 3/8”
Wing Dividers 6 or 8”
Spokeshave
Steel Square, 12 to 18”

Also I noticed marking gauges to be amazingly expensive – am I looking in the wrong place, or are they? I see people making them all the time and was just surprised at the price.. but I guess if they are that expensive, that’s why you make them! :)

-- Lis - Michigan - http://www.missmooseart.com - https://www.etsy.com/people/lisbokt



22 comments so far

View canadianchips's profile

canadianchips

1831 posts in 1687 days


#1 posted 07-01-2010 02:55 AM

I am certain your list today is more than $35.00 like it was in 1935 !lol

-- "My mission in life - make everyone smile !"

View TopamaxSurvivor's profile

TopamaxSurvivor

14874 posts in 2366 days


#2 posted 07-01-2010 03:43 AM

Probably over 1000 today.

-- "some old things are lovely, warm still with life ... of the forgotten men who made them." - D.H. Lawrence

View tyskkvinna's profile

tyskkvinna

1308 posts in 1676 days


#3 posted 07-01-2010 04:03 AM

Guys I’m not asking for prices of things. (I did that already) I’m asking for tool suggestions, to replace some of the ones on the list with more modern items that do the same thing.

-- Lis - Michigan - http://www.missmooseart.com - https://www.etsy.com/people/lisbokt

View TopamaxSurvivor's profile

TopamaxSurvivor

14874 posts in 2366 days


#4 posted 07-01-2010 04:07 AM

If you want to stay away from electric planers to replace the plane, then you are still at the hand plane. Maybe I’m still missing it?

-- "some old things are lovely, warm still with life ... of the forgotten men who made them." - D.H. Lawrence

View tyskkvinna's profile

tyskkvinna

1308 posts in 1676 days


#5 posted 07-01-2010 04:08 AM

I kind of figured most of you don’t use a ratchet brace these days…?

-- Lis - Michigan - http://www.missmooseart.com - https://www.etsy.com/people/lisbokt

View TopamaxSurvivor's profile

TopamaxSurvivor

14874 posts in 2366 days


#6 posted 07-01-2010 04:11 AM

No, that would be a 1/2 reversible drill motor, but most planing would be done with a planer or small electric plane too, Not very many just use hand tools anymore.

-- "some old things are lovely, warm still with life ... of the forgotten men who made them." - D.H. Lawrence

View tyskkvinna's profile

tyskkvinna

1308 posts in 1676 days


#7 posted 07-01-2010 04:14 AM

I know I do not… but I see lots of people here mentioning hand planes all the time so.. I guess I assumed there was a fairly strong do-it-by-hand following. :)

-- Lis - Michigan - http://www.missmooseart.com - https://www.etsy.com/people/lisbokt

View TopamaxSurvivor's profile

TopamaxSurvivor

14874 posts in 2366 days


#8 posted 07-01-2010 04:19 AM

Folding rule, 6-foot = 12 foot tape measure, Tool Grinder = electric grinider, rip saw = table saw or circular saw, compass saw = jig saw or sawzall, hand saw = circular saw/skill saw. I that what yiou are getting at? most of the other hand tools would still be used i think, at least I still use them.

-- "some old things are lovely, warm still with life ... of the forgotten men who made them." - D.H. Lawrence

View TopamaxSurvivor's profile

TopamaxSurvivor

14874 posts in 2366 days


#9 posted 07-01-2010 04:21 AM

I think they are a few purestists or collectors on the hand planes. Most guys use a block plane, but not very many do all their planing by hand. That is a lot of work!!

-- "some old things are lovely, warm still with life ... of the forgotten men who made them." - D.H. Lawrence

View tyskkvinna's profile

tyskkvinna

1308 posts in 1676 days


#10 posted 07-01-2010 04:22 AM

yeah! that’s definitely what I was getting at :-)

(and apparently should not play the communication game tonight :P )

-- Lis - Michigan - http://www.missmooseart.com - https://www.etsy.com/people/lisbokt

View Chuck 's profile

Chuck

88 posts in 1890 days


#11 posted 07-01-2010 04:30 AM

For the hobbiest, this list would not be terribly different; in fact most of these tools are readily available, albeit for a price. For those trying to make a living, I’m guessing speed of manufacturing is everything. So depending on the scale, the trend is toward fewer machines that are increasingly multifunctional.

-- Chuck, Washington D.C.

View David Craig's profile

David Craig

2135 posts in 1799 days


#12 posted 07-01-2010 04:37 AM

A few observations about the list. Not sure about the relevancy but wanted to join the conversation :)

Some hand tools in this list are used in conjunction with power tools today. For example, firmer chisels are often used to clean out mortises and tenons that were cut by the drill press and table saw. Hand measuring tools (calipers, marking gauge, wooden ruler, squares) will probably always be in vogue. I like using a fold out wooden rule more so than a tape measure because you don’t get the slop when measuring longer pieces. If you find a fold out with a good outside measuring slide, you can get some nice, accurate, measurements on larger pieces.

Coping saws are not as in much use with the scrollsaw and bandsaw in operation these days. There some hand tool purists who will use them, sometimes a good handsaw gives you control in situations where a circular saw is too bulky or inconvenient to use. The claw hammer is one I rarely use anymore now that I have an air nailer, though I do use dead blow hammers and rubber tipped ball peen hammers quite regularly to tap things into position. Clamps of every type will always be useful.

Hand planes will always be useful until they make 40 inch jointers that are cheap and efficient. Same with card scrapers. You are not confined in the width of the piece you are working on. Electric planers can fit the bill but I think they don’t provide the same level of control that a good hand plane provides. Spokeshaves can be very useful for curved or bent pieces that might be less comfortable to slide a trim or regular router around.

I don’t see too many items on this list that would be considered completely obsolete, even for a power tool user. There remains too many situations in which a hand tool provides a convenience that power tools don’t always have.

David

-- There is little that is simple when it comes to making a simple box.

View Dennisgrosen's profile

Dennisgrosen

10850 posts in 1805 days


#13 posted 07-01-2010 04:39 AM

if you talk about planes
a jackplane
a jointer
a scrupplane
wood be real handy
then a shuolder and a rebeate plane
a routerplane
and a plovplane
a ripsav large and small
cardscrabers and the burnisher
and it shuold be benchcheisels indstead ad ½” and a 5/8 ” in the set
stealruler 30-50 cm
markingknife

throw away the glasscutter

View 8iowa's profile

8iowa

1489 posts in 2451 days


#14 posted 07-01-2010 04:55 AM

I don’t see molding planes on the list. they were in wide use in the first half of the 20th century, but have been almost totally replaced by power shapers, molders, and routers.

Molding planes are pretty common at antique stores and some flea markets.

-- "Heaven is North of the Bridge"

View BertFlores58's profile

BertFlores58

1646 posts in 1612 days


#15 posted 07-01-2010 07:58 AM

Lis,
I just cut and paste yours and look what I actively have on the shop.

Hand Saw (Crosscut) 8 point, 24” (I have 2 pcs 7 point 22”)
Claw Hammer, 13 oz (3 pcs )
Smoothing plane, 9” – (I made my own wooden planes—2 pcs on different angle)
Block Plane, 5 or 6” – ( I have made two and bought 2 stanleys)
Coping Frame – (I have 2 pcs)
Coping Blades (assorted) (I have for metals and wood different and assorted)
Woodworkers’ Vise, 7” Jaw ( Have 2 top bench portable. 1-6 inches wood, 4 inches metal)
Bar Clamp Attachment (F-clamp 6pcs)
Ratchet Brace, 8” and Bits ranging from 1/4” to 3/4” (none)
Marking Gauge (I made 1)
Compass Saw (I have 2 pcs )
Firmer Chisels – (I have different sizes of flat chisels up 1/4 to 1-/2)
1/4”
3/4”
1”

Gimlet (No idea of this)
Screwdriver (Assorted)
Nail Set (4 pcs varying size)
Brad Awl (I have Ice pick)
Rose Countersink (None)
Try-Square (I have 5 varying sizes … One of them is my father’s nearly 60 years old but still working)
Universal Bevel (None) (I have universal manual setting but not a protractor type)
Knife (Paring) ( have the one I took out from kitchen but now stationed in the workshop)
3-square File (have only 1pc … I like to buy around but no available in the store)
Flat file (Assorted sizes and grade)
2-ft Rule (Got 5 meter push-pull tape)
Cabinet Scraper (Assorted but sometimes I use broken glass…. )

Combination Oilstone (Got plenty 5 pcs)
Back Saw, 12” (3 pcs assorted sizes and tpi)
Rip Saw, 26” (Have only 2 rip saw 22 inches)
Clamps, 2 – “Hand Screws” (None)
“C” Clamps, 2-6” (None)
Folding rule, 6-foot (None)
Wooden Mallet (1 given to me by Phil)
Wood Rasp, Half round (1 flat)
Expansion Bit (What is this?)
Screwdriver Bit (what for)
Glass Cutter (I have to pieces)
Hack Saw, 8 to 12” (For metal) (I have two sets)
Combination Pliers (1 piece)
Tool Grinder (None)
Bench Stop (None)
Hand drill (None)
Twist drills, 1/16” to 3/8” (Have 2 pcs 3/4 and 5/8)
Outside callipers (None)
Gouge, 3/8” (1 pc)
Wing Dividers 6 or 8” (I have 2 pieces pointed)
Spokeshave (2 PCS)
Steel Square, 12 to 18” (i HAVE ONE)

OH MY, I HAVE DONE MY INVENTORY OF HAND TOOLS. I AM REALLY A HANDTOOL GUY. WHAT I LIKE WHEN DOING THINGS MANUALLY IS I CAN CONTROL IT BETTER. I DO HAVE MACHINERIES BUT I AM LIMITED TO USE IN SO MANY WAYS… SOUND LIMITATION, HOW BIG IS THE WORK, ETC…

For those that I don’t have then it is no longer needed. Please note that what I have is still needed in my woodworking today as most of them are still in use aside from using electric.

-- Bert

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