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Forum topic by Debora Cadene posted 05-26-2015 02:39 PM 1081 views 0 times favorited 20 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Debora Cadene

54 posts in 1328 days


05-26-2015 02:39 PM

Hey all. I’m going to build a chicken coop. The plans are not cut in stone. The angle I’m trying to figure out is for the roof. The upright 2×4’s will be placed inside a 2×6 frame that will sit on 4×4 frame. the 2×6’s will be sitting on the edge, and the 2×4 will sit flat side to the flat side of the 2×6 on the inside. The front wall is 7’ and the back wall is 6’. The individual that designed the coop just made the top board sit flush with the top of the 2×4, but if I can figure out an angle , i’d do that. The coop is 5×10, keeping in mind that the 2×4’s are inside the 2×6.

I think I just confused myself with that explanation. I’ll attach the coop for clarity. I don’t have the plans yet, because my computer is too old to download the Sketchup so I can see what is what, so i’ve been overthinking the whole thing before I even get started.

Any and all help and suggestions will be GREATLY appreciated.
Here is a link to it on my Pinterest board.

https://www.pinterest.com/pin/151574343686062473/

thanks bunches guys.


20 replies so far

View rwe2156's profile

rwe2156

2198 posts in 947 days


#1 posted 05-26-2015 02:54 PM

I’ve built a lot of farm type housing so let me suggest something else a lot simpler.

Build the walls just like a house. Make the back wall about 6” shorter than the front.
Then set the “rafters” on top of the top plate.
You can use hurricane clips if you want, but I would just toe nail them in.
The rise/run is so shallow you don’t absolutely need to cut birds mouth notches you can just lay them on top.

And don’t forget a door and some roosting perches.
Also, we found the cheap plastic door mats make great liners for the laying boxes.
Way cleaner and easier to maintain than shavings or hay.

-- Everything is a prototype thats why its one of a kind!!

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TopamaxSurvivor

17676 posts in 3143 days


#2 posted 05-27-2015 07:48 AM

That is fairly easy to do with a framing square. A bit much to type out an explanation. If you goggle “framing square rafter layout” I’m sure they already have a lot of advise ;-)

-- Bob in WW ~ "some old things are lovely, warm still with life ... of the forgotten men who made them." - D.H. Lawrence

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Debora Cadene

54 posts in 1328 days


#3 posted 05-27-2015 11:12 AM

Thank you both for your reply’s. I do have a framing square, but to be honest, I don’t really know how to use it properly. I will definetely look that up on google.

Robert, do you think that 12” is too much of a slope? its 7’ in the front and 6’ in the back. I was wondering if only 6” would be sufficient.

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bondogaposis

4036 posts in 1818 days


#4 posted 05-27-2015 01:16 PM

do you think that 12” is too much of a slope? its 7’ in the front and 6’ in the back. I was wondering if only 6” would be sufficient.

It depends what part of the country you live in and how much of a snow load you typically get. A steeper pitch roof sheds it faster. Also steeper roofs tend to have less problems w/ leaks and collecting debris such as leaves, pine needles, etc. I would probably leave it as is.

-- Bondo Gaposis

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Debora Cadene

54 posts in 1328 days


#5 posted 05-27-2015 01:27 PM

Thank you. We can get quite a bit of snow around here, and the coop is going to be in between a few tree’s as well.

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bonesbr549

1176 posts in 2534 days


#6 posted 05-27-2015 01:34 PM

Go buy a speed square at your local box store. Go to Youtube and it will tell you what you need to know.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yPL6jOa6AH8

Greatest little tool.

Personally I’d go no less than a 4/12 pitch.

-- Sooner or later Liberals run out of other people's money.

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dhazelton

2326 posts in 1763 days


#7 posted 05-27-2015 03:19 PM

Whoever drew that ‘plan’ up has zero experience framing a building. Not only would it be overly complicated to build it would be extremely weak. I’d go to Home Depot or Lowes and pick up one of the books on building small sheds if you need a step by step. $20 well spent.

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jerryminer

528 posts in 908 days


#8 posted 05-27-2015 04:55 PM

Debora—

I think you are asking about the angle formed between walls and roof with a 12” height difference over a 5 foot span. These angles are called “pitch” and described as “rise over run”—-in your case a 12” rise over a 60” run would be expressed as a 2.4-in-12 pitch (2.4” is about 2 7/16”)—-the angle works out to 11.3 degrees. A calculator can figure this stuff for you. Here’s a graphic:

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Ghidrah

667 posts in 689 days


#9 posted 05-27-2015 06:45 PM

because you have preset wall hgts, 1st you need to know the run and rise of the roof. Is the back to front 5’ or 10’? with a 1’ rise and a 5’ run the rafter would have a rise of 2.4” per foot of run. If the run is 10’ the rise would be 1.2” per foot of run. On one side of a proper framing square the blade and tongue meas is broken down by 12ths for measuring and cutting stairs, rafters and braces. The process of measuring, marking and cutting a rafter is quite simple once one is accustomed with all aspects. But the nomenclature alone can fog the brain of one not remotely familiar with the trade. Look for a framer close by and ask if he/she can make to a raft temp you can used to mark out the rest of the rafts on the project then learn how to use a circ on junk wood so you don’t waste the good.

I would also take heed and rethink my stud wall layout, if the design offered to you is true your heading for sorrow down the road when the walls begin flexing.

I’d use the 4X4 or even 6X6 PT for foundation and sled runners incase you want to move it down the road. I’d use 2X6 PT for box, joists and subfloor. 2X4 for plates and studs, 1/2” CDX ply is fine for walls and roof. Frame with studs on edge instead of on the flat.

-- I meant to do that!

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Debora Cadene

54 posts in 1328 days


#10 posted 05-28-2015 12:06 PM

OK…so from front to back its 5’, and the coop is planned for 10 feet long. So the rise is 7’. I’m not sure about the run though…is the run measured from the outside of the 2×4 that sits inside the 2×6? or is it measured from the inside of both the 2×4’s.
I planned on using PT 4×4’s for the base, and PT 2×6’s for the base of the entire coop, but the rest was going to be 2×4’s. With such a small hen house (4’ x 5’) would you still use 2×6 for the subfloor. I am “assuming when you say subfloor, that is what you are talking about. I was not planning on putting any floor inside the floor of the coop…I was going to fill it with sand.
And will 2×4’s not be good enough to support the roof? ( you mentioned joist) AND…..... I don’t know what plates are….

If I put the studs on edge vs on the flat…will the plans change much?

The individual that came up with the plan tells us very clearly, that he isn’t a carpenter and that this is just what HE did to build his coop. It ” looks” simple enough…but you’re right…I don’t want to have to redo anything on this…BUT I do want to keep it simple. I think getting a small shed book is a great idea and will for sure pick one up.

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hotbyte

844 posts in 2442 days


#11 posted 05-28-2015 01:11 PM

A search on youtube turned up this storage shed video. It is a time lapse video without any dialog but gives a decent idea of construction process for a similar lean-to style structure.

View rwe2156's profile

rwe2156

2198 posts in 947 days


#12 posted 05-28-2015 03:36 PM


Thank you both for your reply s. I do have a framing square, but to be honest, I don t really know how to use it properly. I will definetely look that up on google.

Robert, do you think that 12” is too much of a slope? its 7 in the front and 6 in the back. I was wondering if only 6” would be sufficient.

- Debora Cadene

I usually go with 1-2” of drop per foot, but more if its less than 12’ wide.

If the coop is, say 5’ wide, then 8-12” of slope should be ok but Bondo is correct about snow load being from FL I didn’t think about that!!

The plate is the 2×4 that is layed flat on top and bottom that the studs are nailed into.

I think well intentioned guys are way over-thinking this with the layout info.
You can just lay the roof joists right on top and use either hurricane clips or some other bracket for a small building like this.

2×6 floor is defintely over-building 2×4 are fine.
I would make a suggestion to use a 1/2×1/2 wire mesh for the floor so the dropping can fall through.

Another suggestion is to look into a chicken “tractor” which is basically a mobile chicken coup you can move around to let the chickens eat grass and ferilize your yard at the same time. YOu can either put it on skids and pull it with a tractor or use tires.

I’ve used one very successfully we used to raise our own broilers and I had one big enough to hold 50 head.

-- Everything is a prototype thats why its one of a kind!!

View Ghidrah's profile

Ghidrah

667 posts in 689 days


#13 posted 05-28-2015 08:11 PM

Debora,
Please take this as constructive criticism and not as an insult, but you currently have no practical experience at all, you aren’t familiar with the common nomenclature let alone the mechanical knowledge to follow through with a construction project. Aside from the minimum number and type of tools you may or may not have, needed to build your coop, if you don’t have the time to learn trade basics and acquire some practical knowledge in assembly you should find someone local who’s had at least a year of OJT.

Incorrect, previously you stated your rear wall was 6’H and the front wall is 7’H the rise would be 1’ (12”). The green rafter, 1st pic, occludes the complete run line at the rear wall. If the coop is 5’ W, (7’ wall to 6’ wall) and 10’L, (left to right along the front or rear walls) the run is 5’. The run measurement is equal to the entire width of the building exterior, ply included.

The interior of the 8×8 garden shed below is what you want the studs and rafters to look like inside. the shed is on cinder blocks that sit on 2 bags of Sakreet at each corner for displacement purposes, I never intend on moving the shed. My gran had 2 coops fixed to the barn for pigeons and chix.

You may also want to reconsider the dimensions of the coop, 6’ by 10’ would utilize the plywood you’ll end up buying better than 5X10, 8×10 better still.

The reason why 2×4 studs should not be nailed on the flat is they tend to bow most on the flat. When studs are laid out for wall building, all should be eyed for crown and set with the crown up for uniformity. It also facilitates construction in the interior, (shelves, tables, nests).


-- I meant to do that!

View GregD's profile

GregD

783 posts in 2603 days


#14 posted 05-28-2015 09:14 PM

You can certainly knock something together in a bunch of different ways. But why not have a bunch of fun with this? Think of this as a small building and use the project as an exercise to learn the basics of construction. Design and build it as if it were a shed or a house, but on a small scale (probably with no utilities). Put aside your urge to “git-er done”, and look for some simple books or web pages on basic framing techniques. So maybe you don’t know the terms joist, rafter, top plate, bottom plate, king stud, cripple stud, blocking, birdsmouth, header and others, but if you spend a bit of time you can learn them. The one thing that you might want to do a bit different is the foundation, since you might like to be able to move the coop from time to time. Put in a real door and a real window so you learn how those go in. You may find you spend as much or more time designing the building (and learning how to do that) than you end up spending to build it. But there ain’t nothing about this that you cannot learn and that you cannot do.

But if you just want to “git-er done”, Ana White happens to have a chicken coop plan. From what I can tell her designs are not so bad and she presents very complete instructions, materials, and methods:
http://ana-white.com/2012/05/plans/shed-chicken-coop

-- Greg D.

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hotbyte

844 posts in 2442 days


#15 posted 05-28-2015 09:24 PM


...You may also want to reconsider the dimensions of the coop, 6 by 10 would utilize the plywood you ll end up buying better than 5X10, 8×10 better still…

I didn’t see any plywood on what she linked???

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