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Forum topic by nowhereman posted 08-29-2009 07:35 PM 4446 views 0 times favorited 19 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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nowhereman

5 posts in 1959 days


08-29-2009 07:35 PM

What happens to a dual voltage (120/240) electric motor if it’s wired for 120v and run on 240v or the opposite 240v on 120v?
Thanks nowhereman


19 replies so far

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GMman

3902 posts in 2351 days


#1 posted 08-29-2009 10:12 PM

Compare it to a light made for 12 volts and connect it to 24 volts (burns) connect it to a 6 volt (dim light)

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marcb

762 posts in 2327 days


#2 posted 08-29-2009 10:48 PM

If its wired for 220 and plugged into 110 it runs really slow, theres probably a good heat buildup on it too which can lower life span.

Not sure about the other direction, probably really bad.

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SCOTSMAN

5361 posts in 2239 days


#3 posted 08-29-2009 10:52 PM

I know of no machine designed for 220 which will operate in 110 or any 110 which will operate on 220.That’s been my experience anyway.However a dual voltage should technically operate on both or should I say either,with a flick of a switch built underneath perhaps,or the use of a step up step down transformer.Alistair

-- excuse my typing as I have a form of parkinsons disease

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Karson

34876 posts in 3054 days


#4 posted 08-29-2009 11:09 PM

It’s probably buy a new motor time.

-- I've been blessed with a father who liked to tinker in wood, and a wife who lets me tinker in wood. Southern Delaware karson_morrison@bigfoot.com †

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a1Jim

112089 posts in 2231 days


#5 posted 08-29-2009 11:14 PM

If in doubt check your diagram or call for help.

-- http://artisticwoodstudio.com Custom furniture

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GMman

3902 posts in 2351 days


#6 posted 08-29-2009 11:22 PM

Your right a1jim diagram will help and it is a common motor all he has to do is change the wires to what he needs.

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GMman

3902 posts in 2351 days


#7 posted 08-29-2009 11:29 PM

Question
Hi, I have a motor that is wired for 120 application, but I would like to run it on 240v. The diagram has 1 ground line 2 tape lines and one that is simply marked line. It has a specific diagram except I do not know what tape refers to. I would like to run it on a 12/3 20amp wire, but with four lines I am not sure what to do. I understand that it is hard to give an exact answer and I read your info on this exact question from the past. Please using you vast knowlege and years of experience could you give me the best most informative answer possible. I do have a clear photo of the schematic and info that could be emailed easily. I kindly thank you for your expertise and advice

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Dominic Vanacora

508 posts in 2523 days


#8 posted 08-29-2009 11:31 PM

GMan is right If you hook up a motor that’s wired for 220 volts to a 110 volt source it will run very slow or not at all. If you were to leave it that way it will burn out. If you wire the motor for 110 volt service and plug it into 220 volts it will burn OUT. The addition of a transformer will work but Just change the wiring, if you can. If you add a transfromer to reduce the voltage to 110 volts from 220 volts you need to keep in mine the current that the motor is drawing so the transformer needs to be sized properly.
Like most this in life the first time is hard after that you will be giving us advice.

-- Dominic, Trinity, Florida...Lets be safe out there.

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Kugel

23 posts in 1924 days


#9 posted 08-29-2009 11:32 PM

If the motor was wired for 120V and run on 240V you should be ok, assuming its all single phase power. Your motor has a power rating, lets say 3 hp (2240 watts). Since Volts x Amps = Power, if you run it on 120V you will pull about 18.5 amps, and when you run it with 240V you will pull 9.5 amps. So with that in mind, all wiring is sized based on the amount of current flowing through the wire. The larger the current, the larger the wire size needed to carry the current. So if your motor was wired for 120V (18.5 amps) and you ran it with 240V (9.5 amps) you should be safe from any overheating or fire hazard. HOWEVER, if you did the other way…...I hope you have a fire extinguisher! Hope this helps.

-- J. KUGEL Kirkland, WA

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GMman

3902 posts in 2351 days


#10 posted 08-29-2009 11:38 PM

Answer
Mike: With the “EXPERT” site I cant send drawing of any kind. Usually with motors that are dual voltage type there will be a wire connection that has to change, or a plug that you move from one pin to another. The main difference is when the motor is set up for 120volt operation you are using the following::

1 hot, 1 neutral, and 1 ground.
for 240 volt operation you use the following::
2 hots, 1 ground, neutral (white wire) is caped off.

I would get the information as to make, model, hp, off the motor and then check for the manufactors web site to try and get a wiring diagram off of it. Hope that helps….

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GMman

3902 posts in 2351 days


#11 posted 08-29-2009 11:44 PM

Kugel it will run on 220 but it will have half the hp that it shold have.

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Kugel

23 posts in 1924 days


#12 posted 08-30-2009 12:01 AM

GMman, I was talking strictly from a safety/fire hazard standpoint, not performance charateristics.

-- J. KUGEL Kirkland, WA

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GMman

3902 posts in 2351 days


#13 posted 08-30-2009 12:09 AM

Yes safety is always first but the only thing that would burn would be the motor it would go dead.

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GMman

3902 posts in 2351 days


#14 posted 08-30-2009 12:13 AM

I have burn motors before and you don’t get a fire.

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Kugel

23 posts in 1924 days


#15 posted 08-30-2009 12:31 AM

Good for you GMman, im glad you have never had to deal with an electrical fire. However, for you to say there is no risk of fire when a motor is burning up is just plain wrong. The NEC was produced for a reason….

-- J. KUGEL Kirkland, WA

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