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Forum topic by SimonSKL posted 08-28-2009 04:45 AM 2032 views 0 times favorited 11 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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SimonSKL

185 posts in 2706 days


08-28-2009 04:45 AM

Topic tags/keywords: jointer straight edge joining

I just purchased my first jointer (Grizzly G0452Z 6”x46” with spiral cutterhead) and need some help with learning how to use it properly to get a straight edge for edge jointing. I followed the instructions but I was not able to get the straight edge after multiple trials. The boards that I want to get a straight edge is about 54”x3 1/2”x1”. After a few runs, I had too much wood removed from the front end and not enough from the tail end. I flipped the board and tried to removed some wood from the now front edge but I ended up with a board with too much wood removed at both ends and not enough in the middle. What did I do wrong?

Is the board too long for the jointer?
Was I putting too much pressure on the front end on the outfeed table?
I know the trick is putting the right pressure in the right location at the right time but I don’t seem to find that balance.
What is the proper technique in getting a straight edge on a long board. Any help and suggestion will be appreciated.

-- Simon, Danville, IL


11 replies so far

View lew's profile

lew

11347 posts in 3222 days


#1 posted 08-28-2009 05:19 AM

Have you made sure the infeed and outfeed tables are parallel. Also, the out feed table must be set so that it is exactly the same height as the cutters.

If these are correct, the process is to feed the board into the cutters- keeping it against the fence and against the infeed table. After about a foot has passed onto the outfeed table, transfer your hands- to the portion of the board on the outfeed table- keeping pressure against the fence and now the outfeed table. With practice, you will be able to transfer your hands easily without loosing forward momentum or vertical alignment. It does not take a lot of downward pressure to keep the board against the tables. In fact, too much pressure can cause a bowed board to “straighten” and cause problems during jointing

-- Lew- Time traveler. Purveyor of the Universe's finest custom rolling pins.

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SimonSKL

185 posts in 2706 days


#2 posted 08-28-2009 05:47 AM

Lew,
Thanks for the comment. I did make sure the cutters are at the same height as the outfeed table. I assume the infeed table is parallel to the outfeed table as there is not any adjustment to that. I think I transferred the pressure on the outfeed table a little too early, like right after the board passes the cutterhead. Is there a limit on how long a board can be straightened on a 46” jointer?

-- Simon, Danville, IL

View TomHintz's profile

TomHintz

207 posts in 2865 days


#3 posted 08-28-2009 09:24 AM

Lew,

The jointer is VERY technique dependent despite looking like such a basic machine. While it is unlikely that a brand new machine is far out of adjustment, check it to be sure. Then, focus on how you are using it. Practice can be a very important part of learning to use a jointer right. I get more questions on this one machine than any other and nearly all of them come down to some point of technique. I have several stories on using the jointer at the link below and there might be something there that will be helpful as you get acquainted with the machine.
As for the length, the rule of thumb has been the maximum board length is about twice the length of the tables. Of course that also is very depenent on using. That alone makes it easier to joint in many cases.

Jointer Stories

-- Tom Hintz, www.newwoodworker.com

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SimonSKL

185 posts in 2706 days


#4 posted 08-28-2009 04:43 PM

Tom,
That is a great link and extremely useful info re jointer and jointer techniques written by you. Thank you so much! I can’t wait to get back to my new jointer and make some woodchips. As you and lew said, practice is the key to get the proper techniques.

-- Simon, Danville, IL

View TomHintz's profile

TomHintz

207 posts in 2865 days


#5 posted 08-28-2009 07:48 PM

I’m glad the articles were of help.
It does take a while to get the feel of using a jointer. I had a master cabinetmaker coaching me when I first used one but as he told me, it takes some time on the machine to get the hang of it. The good news is that this kind of practice is fun!

-- Tom Hintz, www.newwoodworker.com

View Bill White's profile

Bill White

4457 posts in 3427 days


#6 posted 08-29-2009 07:40 PM

On top of what Tom shows, don ‘t hog off material. The jointer ain’t a bulldozer. Its just an electric plane. Small cuts, and SAFE cuts (ever thought about what that beast can do to your fingers?) will get ya through.
Bill

-- bill@magraphics.us

View SimonSKL's profile

SimonSKL

185 posts in 2706 days


#7 posted 09-01-2009 02:30 PM

I finally got it! After some practice I squared up two boards of 54” x 2 1/2” x1” in 4 passes (2 passes on each side) and the edge and face were perfectly straight and square! I am so happy. I guess I was putting way too much pressure on the outfeed table before. The Grizzly 6” jointer with the spiral cutterhead produces an extremely smooth surface, better than my Dewalt planer. Thanks everyone for the tips. I am glad I found this web site and learn from you all.

-- Simon, Danville, IL

View jerryz's profile

jerryz

164 posts in 2745 days


#8 posted 09-01-2009 03:22 PM

Remember that normally you joint 1 edge then rip to width on the table saw leaving 1/16” over the needed width if you want to joint the 2nd edge.
This assures you that you have a perfectly parallel board.

Have fun with your new jointer….and be safe.

View SimonSKL's profile

SimonSKL

185 posts in 2706 days


#9 posted 09-01-2009 04:15 PM

Jerryz,
Thanks for the comment. I understand after I jointed one edge the board may not be parallel and I will need the table saw to get the board parallel. I don’t understand leaving the 1/16” over the needed width to joint the 2nd edge. Please explain. Thanks!

-- Simon, Danville, IL

View Xtreme90's profile

Xtreme90

193 posts in 2659 days


#10 posted 09-01-2009 05:01 PM

Simon,

just wanted to quick say how when I first purchased my grizzly jointer the same senario happened to me. My father then grabed the same board and machined it down to a flat suction surface. He then explained the same thing such as Tom did earlier. A jointer is a very tecnique required tool, but with practice you will develop the skill needed. I now take twist out of 8’x 10” x 1” boards. Now I do have a 12”wide x 90” long jointer! She’s a big girl. But like you said I love the spiral cutterhead! Smooth isn’t real loud and just eats wood! Your jointer will do amazing things to narly hacky piece of wood, you’ll wonder how did I ever go without one of these bad boys!

Happy jointing! Be safe.

-- "I don't cut wood. I machine it!" G.M. The wood machinest

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SimonSKL

185 posts in 2706 days


#11 posted 09-01-2009 05:48 PM

Xtreme90,
Wow, I can’t imagine jointing a 8’x10”x1” board. I was debating if I should get the 6” Grizzly w the 55” table but decided on a shorter table with the spiral cutterhead instead due to the small space that I have in my workshop. I believe I won’t be jointing boards longer than 7’ very often. A 6”x 46” table is quite adequate for the type of woodworking that I do.

-- Simon, Danville, IL

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