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Forum topic by pappypitts posted 05-19-2015 07:05 PM 575 views 0 times favorited 6 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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pappypitts

7 posts in 566 days


05-19-2015 07:05 PM

Topic tags/keywords: engineered hardwoods hardwood floors floors remodel

Hello, I’m doing a remodel, part of the house has hardwoods over the sub floor other parts carpet and tile. I want to use an engineered hardwood over the entire home. Should I remove the hardwood or place anther subfloor over the exisitng to match the heights. my concern is when i come back with engineered i’ll have issues with doors what should I do


6 replies so far

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mcg1990

159 posts in 755 days


#1 posted 05-19-2015 07:14 PM

I’d tear down to the subflooring, if for no other reason than to be able to check for damage (if it’s an old house especially) and have piece of mind.

Consistency of floor height is also nice, of course.

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pappypitts

7 posts in 566 days


#2 posted 05-19-2015 07:15 PM



I d tear down to the subflooring, if for no other reason than to be able to check for damage (if it s an old house especially) and have piece of mind.

Consistency of floor height is also nice, of course.

- mcg1990

Thanks


I d tear down to the subflooring, if for no other reason than to be able to check for damage (if it s an old house especially) and have piece of mind.

Consistency of floor height is also nice, of course.

- mcg1990


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isotope

146 posts in 1087 days


#3 posted 05-19-2015 08:07 PM

One thing to consider is that in addition to the height of the doors, the height of the door jambs is also important. In most cases the jamb is installed after the flooring (baseboards also). So, if you tear out some flooring and replace with your engineered flooring, will you be too high or too low? If you are too high, then you can cut the jambs and doors. If you are too low, that is trickier and I don’t have a good clean solution for you. Fundamentally, you just need a block to fill the gap so there are probably many options.

Personally, when redoing the floors in my house, I had to rip out 8 layers of flooring in the kitchen before reaching the subfloor! Needless to say this was no fun at all. I’d advocate removing the old floor. It will be easier to match the floor heights. Maybe a little more work now, but better in the long run should more changes happen in the future.

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pappypitts

7 posts in 566 days


#4 posted 05-19-2015 08:37 PM



One thing to consider is that in addition to the height of the doors, the height of the door jambs is also important. In most cases the jamb is installed after the flooring (baseboards also). So, if you tear out some flooring and replace with your engineered flooring, will you be too high or too low? If you are too high, then you can cut the jambs and doors. If you are too low, that is trickier and I don t have a good clean solution for you. Fundamentally, you just need a block to fill the gap so there are probably many options.

Personally, when redoing the floors in my house, I had to rip out 8 layers of flooring in the kitchen before reaching the subfloor! Needless to say this was no fun at all. I d advocate removing the old floor. It will be easier to match the floor heights. Maybe a little more work now, but better in the long run should more changes happen in the future.

- isotope


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pappypitts

7 posts in 566 days


#5 posted 05-19-2015 08:38 PM

Thanks. That seems to be the answer this far.

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Ghidrah

667 posts in 685 days


#6 posted 05-20-2015 02:12 AM

If continuity of color and look is important then rip it all out to the SF. If you want to highlight the differences between rooms, (even if they’re open to each other) then leave the existing stick built in but maybe refinish the surface to coincide with the new product.

-- I meant to do that!

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