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Forum topic by Combo Prof posted 05-18-2015 06:23 PM 1276 views 0 times favorited 18 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Combo Prof

2382 posts in 741 days


05-18-2015 06:23 PM

Topic tags/keywords: unknown unknown tool question

I found these in an old (Early 1900s) Master Carpenters Tool chest. Can some one tell me what they are and what they are used for?

-- Don K, (Houghton, Michigan)


18 replies so far

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SCOTSMAN

5839 posts in 3048 days


#1 posted 05-18-2015 06:27 PM

Machinists lathe bed scrapers, look up metal lathe scrapers to see how they are used.Alistair

-- excuse my typing as I have a form of parkinsons disease

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Combo Prof

2382 posts in 741 days


#2 posted 05-18-2015 08:10 PM

Are you sure the spoon ends don’t have any sort of edge. (Otherwise I’d agree with you!)

-- Don K, (Houghton, Michigan)

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putty

1000 posts in 1070 days


#3 posted 05-18-2015 08:12 PM

Babbit bearing scraper?

-- Putty

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Combo Prof

2382 posts in 741 days


#4 posted 05-18-2015 08:17 PM

I’d agree but they have no cutting edge? So I’m still confused. Are they just unsharpened?

-- Don K, (Houghton, Michigan)

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JayT

4778 posts in 1674 days


#5 posted 05-18-2015 08:22 PM

I’m wondering if they aren’t pattern making tools of some kind. They remind me of tools used by artists to shape and mark on clay.

-- "Good judgement is the result of experience. A lot of experience is the result of poor judgement."

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bold1

262 posts in 1310 days


#6 posted 05-19-2015 01:35 PM

They do look like some of the tools used by a mold maker at a foundry.

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Tim

3113 posts in 1425 days


#7 posted 05-19-2015 05:25 PM

I agree, but it’s the sharp point on the other end that’s a little weird for that use. I think Don said they were needle sharp which is even odd for a fid which would just be pointed not sharp from the ones I’ve seen.

But I’ve also seen a lot of tools come out of old chests that were modified from their original intended purpose, that could have happened too.

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Combo Prof

2382 posts in 741 days


#8 posted 05-19-2015 05:40 PM



I agree, but it s the sharp point on the other end that s a little weird for that use. I think Don said they were needle sharp which is even odd for a fid which would just be pointed not sharp from the ones I ve seen.

But I ve also seen a lot of tools come out of old chests that were modified from their original intended purpose, that could have happened too.

- Tim

When I cleaned them up I may have put too much of a point in them, but they looked pretty sharp and pointy to me at the start.

I think they may be marlinspikes. I’m going to ask the nephew of the original tool owner’s son if he knows, when I see him. He is hard to get a hold of.

(I bought the chest that contained these tools from this nephew)

-- Don K, (Houghton, Michigan)

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Jim Baldwin

55 posts in 1822 days


#9 posted 05-20-2015 06:07 AM

Basic carving rasp tools called “rifflers”. Typically available in course, medium and fine. They’re indispensable for both wood carving and stone sculpture, although hard stone will wear the teeth off. Any reputable 19th century trim carpenter would’ve kept a few on hand just to smooth and blend moldings together and especially useful for handrail joints. You can pay $7.50 for an 8pcs Chinese set (blue plastic thing) or $70 ea for handmade in France (on my wish list).

-- Jim Baldwin/jimhbaldwin@gmail.com

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MrRon

3926 posts in 2707 days


#10 posted 05-20-2015 08:33 PM

My guess would be: They were rifflers salvaged from a factory that makes them, before teeth were cut into them. They were further modified by the salvager who put a point on one for scribing metals and a triangular end for bearing scraping. Strictly a guess.

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Dallas

3599 posts in 1950 days


#11 posted 05-20-2015 08:53 PM

Were these old PA dutch tools?

Something on that order use to be used for a drift to bring large peg holes and tenons into alignment, although I never saw the shaft that short or the working point that small or sharp.
We took a bunch of barns apart many years ago and found tools kinda like that hidden above beams and joists.

Not saying that’s what they are, but, they certainly are similar, even to the spoon shaped hand hold for leverage.

-- Improvise.... Adapt...... Overcome!

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Combo Prof

2382 posts in 741 days


#12 posted 05-20-2015 10:42 PM

Could be the point ends are a tang for a wooden handle, then the rifller idea of MrRon and Jim Baldwin mave be coorect except there is no evidence of teeth cut in the “spoon ends”. Unless of course as MrRon says they were obtained befor teeth were cut into them.

I would agree with you Dallas that they are draw bores, except the shafts are not tapered and would not have been so pointy.

-- Don K, (Houghton, Michigan)

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Dallas

3599 posts in 1950 days


#13 posted 05-20-2015 11:36 PM

Don, the ones we found didn’t have tapered shafts. They all looked a lot like this except for being too short for timber work.

BTW, Houghton? A feller that use to be a friend of mine and his daughters and his wife who is in the hospital live in Baraga.

-- Improvise.... Adapt...... Overcome!

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Combo Prof

2382 posts in 741 days


#14 posted 05-20-2015 11:56 PM

Cool. Baraga is just down the road.

-- Don K, (Houghton, Michigan)

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bold1

262 posts in 1310 days


#15 posted 05-21-2015 12:33 AM

I was looking at your photos again. They couldn’t be ground down, hand made, spoon bits could they?

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