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[Need Advice] Dado set use on my table saw

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Forum topic by CHETT posted 05-18-2015 05:25 PM 1772 views 0 times favorited 26 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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CHETT

3 posts in 571 days


05-18-2015 05:25 PM

Topic tags/keywords: dado skil question tablesaw

I have a Skil Model 3400 – 10” Table Saw (F01234004A) 4800 rpm. I purchased a Diablo 8” stacked dado set from my local Home Depot.

When reviewing the manual for the Skil saw it recommends a 6” Dado set (#80050) and Dado insert plate (#80075). Both of which I’m not easily finding available online, including on the Skil tools website. I seems to me that this model saw is older and not in the current generation.

I am still a new-ish woodworker with the hopes to make some new storage for my home. I need some advice on the use of this dado set with my saw. Are there significant red flags here – either tool function or malfunction with this blade set, safety concerns?

The arbor sizes are compatible. (5/8”)
I believe the saw should accommodate the 8” blade.
I believe I need to confirm the saw will handle up to a 1/2” cut width.
What alternatives do I have for the insert plate? I have not found one for my saw to be available.

It isn’t likely I can replace the saw outright, simply not in my budget. But if I am unable to use my saw, I’ll have to look for another approach.

Also, I know I could make the dado cuts with my existing saw and blade, by making a few passes. My project however has a significant number of dado cuts to make. It’s a number of storage cabinets which plastic storage bins will slide into the dado grooves. If it was just a few on a single unit I’d go this route.

Thanks in advance for any advice!
-C


26 replies so far

View derrickparks57's profile

derrickparks57

128 posts in 1337 days


#1 posted 05-18-2015 06:04 PM

I did a quick Google search and found a couple part websites but neither show the dado insert. They show the regular insert but it says that that part is now obsolete, so I’m willing to bet finding the dado insert is going to be a needle in a haystack search. Best bet would be to try and make your own insert for the saw. If the manual recommends a 6” dado stack I would stick with that size for safety sake. It may run the 8” but that’s a risk I wouldn’t take. You may try contacting Skil directly to see if you can get the insert.

-- Derrick, Florida, DP Woodwerks

View bbasiaga's profile

bbasiaga

757 posts in 1461 days


#2 posted 05-18-2015 06:12 PM

From my research, it seems most of the less than 3hp saws recommend the 6” stacks because of power limitations. The larger diameter blades of an 8” stack put more strain on the motor, effectively limiting cut depth per pass. The other thing to consider is that the larger diameter stack will have a lot more rotational inertia, which could lead to vibration if the saw really can’t handle it.

I warn you I might not have the whole story on this, but that is what I have found so far.

The other limitation some of these saws have, including my R4510, is that the arbor isn’t long enough to get a very wide stack on there. The prevailing wisdom seems to be that you want 3 threads protruding through the nut. So you can guess how much width you can handle based on that.

Does your saw have a super thin throat plate? A lot of guys make their own plates using plywood of the appropriate thickness. On some saws, like mine, the plate is a thin gauge metal and you can’t duplicate it yourself because there is no plywood thin enough. I have often thought of making one out of hardwood, then resawing it to the proper thickness on a bandsaw. If push came to shove, it might work.

-Brian

-- Part of engineering is to know when to put your calculator down and pick up your tools.

View oltexasboy1's profile

oltexasboy1

240 posts in 1171 days


#3 posted 05-18-2015 06:23 PM

Peachtree woodworking tools has a lot of aftermarket throat plates, check with them.

-- "The pursuit of perfection often yields excellence"

View Fred Hargis's profile

Fred Hargis

3947 posts in 1959 days


#4 posted 05-18-2015 06:25 PM

I think you should go back to a 6” set, if your saw is otherwise capable (the stuff above about arbor length and the throat plate). Take the one you have back and look for a Freud SD206 set, get it online if you have to, but only if the saw can handle it.

-- Our village hasn't lost it's idiot, he was elected to congress.

View MrUnix's profile (online now)

MrUnix

4234 posts in 1665 days


#5 posted 05-18-2015 06:33 PM

That saw is one of those generic plastic benchtop models with a universal screamer motor… I would be reluctant to use any dado stack on it, but the manual does claim it can do up to 1/2 inch using a 6” blade stack. If you are going to use it for any kind of continued use, a dado blade will tear that gearbox/motor up pretty quickly, and an 8” stack would do it even quicker. If you do go the 6” route, I’d only make one or two cuts and then let it rest for a good while before doing a couple more… otherwise you will probably melt the motor. A dado insert can be made out of hardboard or other suitable material.

Alternatively, if you have one, a router would be a much better option.

Cheers,
Brad

-- Brad in FL - To be old and wise, you must first be young and stupid

View waho6o9's profile

waho6o9

7179 posts in 2043 days


#6 posted 05-18-2015 06:51 PM

View BroncoBrian's profile

BroncoBrian

435 posts in 1425 days


#7 posted 05-18-2015 08:03 PM

I am with Brad on this one. Was hesitating to say it, but no. Don’t try to use a dado on that saw. Good old repeated cuts on a thick kerf blade or a router is the best way to go.

-- Bigfoot tries to take pictures of me

View nkawtg's profile

nkawtg

204 posts in 717 days


#8 posted 05-18-2015 08:26 PM

In deference to DKV, can you take a ZCI and make a DADO insert?
I’m thinking yes, but I wanted some expert advice.

View pintodeluxe's profile

pintodeluxe

4859 posts in 2279 days


#9 posted 05-18-2015 08:27 PM

I tried putting a dado stack on a Craftsman tablesaw. It was basically a glorified benchtop saw, on metal legs. I found that the arbor bolt wasn’t long enough to accept a full dado set. So that is one thing to watch out for.

-- Willie, Washington "If You Choose Not To Decide, You Still Have Made a Choice" - Rush

View Gerald's profile

Gerald

51 posts in 1252 days


#10 posted 05-18-2015 08:59 PM

Sounds like a “wobble” dado might be a good solution to your needs. That’s what I used for years. Granted the cut will not be as good as a stack, however, 6” sets are readily available, not expensive, have less mass, will fit on shorter arbors (Leave your blade washer off. You don’t need it with a dado blade.), and will give you cuts that are plenty adequate for the application you describe.

Definitely make your own table insert. They’re remarkably easy to make, better than any pre-cut insert and far less expensive than buying. There are many YouTube’s showing the process. I use hex socket set screws in tight fitting holes to level and get just the right height on the ones I make.

Welcome to the brotherhood of sawdust makers, btw.

-- Gerald, Rural North Central Arkansas

View NJJoe's profile

NJJoe

7 posts in 605 days


#11 posted 05-18-2015 09:37 PM

Chett ~

I have a Skil 3410 and use a 6” set with very good results. Specifically: Oshlun SDS-0630 30 Tooth Stacked Dado Set w/5/8” arbor. It is incredibly well made comes in a metal case and makes super clean cuts even with a lower powered saw like we have. It is available on Amazon and from toolcity.com

View CHETT's profile

CHETT

3 posts in 571 days


#12 posted 05-18-2015 09:46 PM

Thank you for the replies thus far, really appreciate the input. I think I’m right to heed the caution about using the dado set on the saw I have. I do have a router and with a good guide/jig setup that may be there better choice for me. I went to the dado set because I thought for the number of cuts I need to make it was the optimal setup / tool choice – and it likely is – if I had the appropriate saw and workshop to handle it.

Thanks for the welcome Gerald, and thank you again for the advice.
When I’m able, I’ll post up my project plans and progress.

-C

View CHETT's profile

CHETT

3 posts in 571 days


#13 posted 05-18-2015 09:47 PM

Thanks for the info, I take a look at that as well.


Chett ~

I have a Skil 3410 and use a 6” set with very good results. Specifically: Oshlun SDS-0630 30 Tooth Stacked Dado Set w/5/8” arbor. It is incredibly well made comes in a metal case and makes super clean cuts even with a lower powered saw like we have. It is available on Amazon and from toolcity.com

- NJJoe


View knotscott's profile (online now)

knotscott

7218 posts in 2842 days


#14 posted 05-18-2015 11:54 PM

Considering the saw that’s in play, I like the option of a router and a straight bit. If you don’t own a suitable router, a modest model from HF or entry level Sears model can cost very close to what a decent entry level stacked dado set will cost, and it’ll spare your saw from the strain of running a heavy stack.

-- Happiness is like wetting your pants...everyone can see it, but only you can feel the warmth....

View BroncoBrian's profile

BroncoBrian

435 posts in 1425 days


#15 posted 05-19-2015 04:02 PM



Considering the saw that s in play, I like the option of a router and a straight bit. If you don t own a suitable router, a modest model from HF or entry level Sears model can cost very close to what a decent entry level stacked dado set will cost, and it ll spare your saw from the strain of running a heavy stack.

- knotscott

I second that. It sound like you are starting a mini production run with one of the most basic saws available. Let that saw do what it is best at and get a decent router and guide set up to do what it is good at.

-- Bigfoot tries to take pictures of me

showing 1 through 15 of 26 replies

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