LumberJocks

Gap Filling Miter Joints - Another Alternative?

  • Advertise with us

« back to Woodworking Skill Share forum

Forum topic by DeLayne Peck posted 05-16-2015 12:18 AM 1115 views 0 times favorited 9 replies Add to Favorites Watch
View DeLayne Peck's profile

DeLayne Peck

426 posts in 1669 days


05-16-2015 12:18 AM

Topic tags/keywords: trick oak tablesaw sand paper chisel utility knife shaping joining

Nothing is more irksome than a open miter. And, I was certainly irked with the my miters on a mirror frame for medicine cabinet I am building in red oak. There were small, but glaring gaps. After reading all the LJs advice, I decided to experiment:

1. I cut a 1/16” shim in red oak.

2. The shim was sanded on one edge to 1/64” to form a wedge. The gap was carefully opened further with a utility knife to create a uniform gap. The wedge was tapped in into the gap.

3. The wedge was cut down and sanded flat.

4. On another corner, I used more than on wedge.

Speculation: Should stain well. No glue involved. Decent result, the gaps can escape notice.

What say you?

-- DJ Peck, Lincoln Nebraska. Lord, keep your arm around my shoulder and your hand over my mouth.


9 replies so far

View Snowbeast's profile

Snowbeast

61 posts in 805 days


#1 posted 05-16-2015 12:25 AM

Looks to me like it will work. I’ll have to remember this since I end up with the same type gaps.

Thanx, DJ

View Gerald Thompson's profile

Gerald Thompson

808 posts in 1702 days


#2 posted 05-16-2015 12:30 AM

I fixed that problem with miters. Made two shooting boards. One a 90d and the other at 45d. I use the LV LA Jack. I use my miter saw to cut to 45d and then use the shooting board. One has to count the passes to make sure all are cut the same. The miters almost disappear.

-- Jerry

View BurlyBob's profile

BurlyBob

3695 posts in 1733 days


#3 posted 05-16-2015 01:16 AM

Looks like you really nailed it. If you don’t mind I’m going to remember and use that trick. Thanks.

View bonesbr549's profile

bonesbr549

1176 posts in 2534 days


#4 posted 05-16-2015 12:46 PM

Shims work great and used them before. When the gap is on the end I’ve used the router bit trick to roll the edges over.

Now, I use Incra with vernier scale and If I’m off by a hair, I can just adjust my cut angle by a hair, and bring it in. I’mean in the end, if you have one side of that miter, at 45.6, and the other at 44.4, no one will know.

I seen this when I’m doing trim on a piece and it’s not perfect at 90.

-- Sooner or later Liberals run out of other people's money.

View ChipByrd's profile

ChipByrd

146 posts in 1394 days


#5 posted 05-16-2015 01:20 PM

That will be very helpful in the future!

I have been woodworking for about 3 years or so, and it’s interesting that one of the truly challenging tasks is to make perfect miters (at least larger ones). I did make a sled for my table saw and that has been super handy.

View Roger's profile

Roger

19886 posts in 2271 days


#6 posted 05-16-2015 01:34 PM

You’ve done a fine job of fixin.

-- Roger from KY. Work/Play/Travel Safe. Keep your dust collector fed. Kentuk55@yahoo.com

View RogerM's profile

RogerM

764 posts in 1866 days


#7 posted 05-16-2015 01:38 PM

The difference between a master craftsman and a novice is that the master knows how to hide his mistakes better. You are definitely the master on this one. Thanks for sharing.

-- Roger M, Aiken, SC

View RogerM's profile

RogerM

764 posts in 1866 days


#8 posted 05-16-2015 01:38 PM

The difference between a master craftsman and a novice is that the master knows how to hide his mistakes better. You are definitely the master on this one. Thanks for sharing.

-- Roger M, Aiken, SC

View distrbd's profile

distrbd

2228 posts in 1914 days


#9 posted 05-16-2015 02:21 PM

As long as it’s not noticeable when you stain it, it is a great fix .

-- Ken from Ontario, Canada

Have your say...

You must be signed in to reply.

DISCLAIMER: Any posts on LJ are posted by individuals acting in their own right and do not necessarily reflect the views of LJ. LJ will not be held liable for the actions of any user.

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

HomeRefurbers.com