LumberJocks

How many of you use the Gripper and what is your assessment

  • Advertise with us

« back to Safety in the Woodworking Shop forum

Forum topic by Bob #2 posted 09-11-2007 08:18 PM 3461 views 1 time favorited 27 replies Add to Favorites Watch
View Bob #2's profile

Bob #2

3808 posts in 2766 days


09-11-2007 08:18 PM

The Grr- ripper is a rubber footed chunk of hi impact plastic with a fair to middle sized handle on the top.
By adjusting the “box” you can set it to cut , rip and guide wood on both a table saw an a jointer.
I don’t yet own one but I have a feeling one is on my short list after viewing some recent hand injuries shown on the web.
It seems like a good whack of money for the basic unit and them there is more stuff to make it work in more situations so it can be a modest investment.
I would like to hear from those of you that have tried the device and rejected it as well as those who have apopted it in their shops.
Also is ther a new version that is different than the older version?
I can’t make head or tail of the website.

Bob

-- A mind, like a home, is furnished by its owner


27 replies so far

View Dick, & Barb Cain's profile

Dick, & Barb Cain

8693 posts in 3044 days


#1 posted 09-11-2007 08:30 PM

Hi Bob,
I recently bought one. Checkout this thread, there’s quite a few comments about it.

-- -** You are never to old to set another goal or to dream a new dream ****************** Dick, & Barb Cain, Hibbing, MN. http://www.woodcarvingillustrated.com/gallery/member.php?uid=3627&protype=1

View mot's profile

mot

4911 posts in 2781 days


#2 posted 09-11-2007 09:36 PM

Hey Bob,

I bought 2 of them a couple of years ago. For many tablesaw jobs, they are a real asset. As with all things, though, they don’t do everything. I use the GRRippers in a leap frog fashion for ripping thin stock, and when dimensioning hardwood. I don’t recall using them for sheet goods. I find that they are terrific for woods that may wander and for smaller pieces. They don’t replace featherboards and pushsticks, but they do add an added way of getting a piece of wood through the saw. If you want to test drive them, I’ll send mine to you to try out. We have a courier that runs to Edmonton everyday, and for 13 bucks you can test drive em for a week or so if you like.

Tom

-- You can discover more about a person in an hour of play than in a year of conversation. (Plato)

View Lori's profile

Lori

66 posts in 2669 days


#3 posted 09-11-2007 11:48 PM

I have had the GRRipper for sometime now and really like it. One of these days I am going to buy a second one.

-- Lori

View Bob #2's profile

Bob #2

3808 posts in 2766 days


#4 posted 09-11-2007 11:57 PM

Mot yer too kind. I ‘m most concerned with being able to fit up the new addtions to the older style Grr rippers.
I had one in my hands at Lee Valley but couldn’t get the information I needed at the time.

Thanks agian for the offer!

Bob

-- A mind, like a home, is furnished by its owner

View Don Niermann  's profile

Don Niermann

209 posts in 2717 days


#5 posted 09-12-2007 02:54 AM

I have two of them. I have usede them for several years and think they are one of the best new products that come along in years. If you buy them get the DVD that tells how to use them and don’t rely on the manual that comes with them. It will make a world of difference in how to use them. Its only about $10.

-- WOOD/DON (...one has the right to ones opinion but not the right to ones own facts...)

View mot's profile

mot

4911 posts in 2781 days


#6 posted 09-12-2007 03:26 AM

The handle and tailhook additions? I think you’re a crafty dude. Make em.

-- You can discover more about a person in an hour of play than in a year of conversation. (Plato)

View Bob #2's profile

Bob #2

3808 posts in 2766 days


#7 posted 09-12-2007 04:09 AM

Is that all?
Shoot, I thought I was going to miss something!

Thanks Mot.

bob

-- A mind, like a home, is furnished by its owner

View mot's profile

mot

4911 posts in 2781 days


#8 posted 09-12-2007 04:18 AM

I have the GRRippers with all the platforms and doohickeys on them, just not the angled grip lifts and the tailhook. Offer still stands, big fella! I might even be able to find ya the instructional DVD.

-- You can discover more about a person in an hour of play than in a year of conversation. (Plato)

View brunob's profile

brunob

2277 posts in 2914 days


#9 posted 09-12-2007 04:22 AM

I have had one for a month or so now. I use it a lot and think it does just what they say it does. It came with the CD which is helpful. Great safety tool but don’t throw away your push sticks.

-- Bruce from Central New York...now, if you'll pardon me, I have some sawdust to make.

View jsheaney's profile

jsheaney

141 posts in 2733 days


#10 posted 09-12-2007 04:57 AM

I had one until recently. I did something rather stupid on my tablesaw and got into a kickback situation. The Gripper got chewed up pretty good, but my hand is fine. Although it got ripped out of my hand and flew into the wall behind me, I don’t think my hand ever came close to the blade.

The thing about the design is that it puts a real protection between you and the blade. In general, it actually rides over the blade; completely enclosing it. It kind of acts like a blade guard. Now that I think about it, if there was one improvement I would make it would be to make it (or maybe just the top) clear, so you could see the workpiece moving through the blade.

I was going to pick up a replacement at Woodcraft last weekend during their sale, but I never made it. It’s on the list.

-- Disappointment is an empty box full of expectation.

View Buckskin's profile

Buckskin

486 posts in 2732 days


#11 posted 09-12-2007 05:01 AM

I don’t have one but after looking at them I think they are a wise addition to the shop. Anything to help you keep your parts!

View Bob #2's profile

Bob #2

3808 posts in 2766 days


#12 posted 09-12-2007 02:43 PM

Bois d’arc ( wood for the archer) or bow wood used by natives In America.
Here's a link to more about the species and why it was prized as a bow wood and oddly a source of dye.

-- A mind, like a home, is furnished by its owner

View Hawgnutz's profile

Hawgnutz

526 posts in 2821 days


#13 posted 09-21-2007 10:48 PM

Hey, Rockler has it on sale for 39.99! I just grabbed one after almost losing a finger or two!

Looks like a great addition to push sticks and featherboards! I wil let you know how I like it, but you may miss the sale!

God Bless,
Hawg

-- Saving barnwood from the scrapyards

View Bob #2's profile

Bob #2

3808 posts in 2766 days


#14 posted 09-22-2007 12:55 AM

I got mine at Lee Valley for $69.00 or so with the extra attachments.
I used it today for cutting some 1/4’ strips for a jig.
This is the first time I have ever been completely comfortable with that cut up against the fence.

It’s a good tool .

LOOKS LIKE IT MAY BE ABLE TO HOLD THE BACON FLAT WHILE IT FRIES TOO. I ‘ll keep you all posted.

http://www.leevalley.com/wood/page.aspx?c=2&p=49712&cat=1,43000
Bob

-- A mind, like a home, is furnished by its owner

View rance's profile

rance

4147 posts in 1905 days


#15 posted 01-25-2011 09:35 PM

I seem to recall someone building their own version of this a few months back but I’m unable to find it here on LJ. Could anyone else direct me to that blog? TIA.

-- Backer boards, stop blocks, build oversized, and never buy a hand plane--

showing 1 through 15 of 27 replies

Have your say...

You must be signed in to reply.

DISCLAIMER: Any posts on LJ are posted by individuals acting in their own right and do not necessarily reflect the views of LJ. LJ will not be held liable for the actions of any user.

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

HomeRefurbers.com

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

GardenTenders.com :: gardening showcase