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I hate asking, but I do not know what block planes these are

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Forum topic by Holbs posted 05-15-2015 04:44 AM 809 views 0 times favorited 6 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Holbs

1379 posts in 1496 days


05-15-2015 04:44 AM

I picked these 4 block planes up at an auction for $10. Reading up on Stanley block planes is … confusing. To 60’s, to 9’s, to 220’s, to 110’s. I have a headache now. Here is a picture of my 4 block planes:

#1 (left most) has no identifying marks, looks rather cheezy, as if made in China. My future glue remover :) #2 is green, with ‘craftsman’ on the blade, “made in usa” on toe, non-movable mouth. #3 I think is a 65 because of the patent, easy grip dimples, and movable mouth. #4 … no idea. no easy grip dimples, non-movable mouth, Stanley SW on the blade. At first, thought it was a 61, but the rear knobs do not match up. Oh, and for some reason, 2 lever caps came with this one: one bigger than the other.

-- Yes, my profile picture is of a Carpenter Bee! The name is derived from the Ancient Greek "wood-cutter"


6 replies so far

View bandit571's profile

bandit571

14625 posts in 2150 days


#1 posted 05-15-2015 11:57 AM

Wood knob, SW iron, two cap iron, and Stanley on the depth adjuster is a #220

Stanley knuckle capped one looks like a #9-1/2, need the eccentric lever to adjust the mouth

Green Craftsman is a Stanley made 9-1/2. the mouth does adjust. Those are lateral levers sitting back there

#1 LOOKS like another #220, maybe a Stanley made for whomever . When you clean them up, you might find numbers stamped into the sides of the middle two.

-- A Planer? I'M the planer, this is what I use

View upchuck's profile

upchuck

540 posts in 1132 days


#2 posted 05-15-2015 12:42 PM

Holbs-
Nice selection of block planes at a very good price. Good buy. Sharpen the blades. Clean and tune the planes and you’re ready to go. I like to have an assortment of block planes with each one set up a little differently for different tasks. Save the extra parts. They always come in handy for trading or replacing something that is broken down the line.

View Don W's profile

Don W

17971 posts in 2034 days


#3 posted 05-15-2015 01:14 PM

#1 (left most) has no identifying marks, looks rather cheezy, as if made in China. My future glue remover :)

I agree this is a #220 knock off

#2 is green, with ‘craftsman’ on the blade, “made in usa” on toe, non-movable mouth.

Sargent made craftsman. Should be ok quality.

#3 I think is a 65 because of the patent, easy grip dimples, and movable mouth.
I think its a #18

#4 … no idea. no easy grip dimples, non-movable mouth, Stanley SW on the blade. At first, thought it was a 61, but the rear knobs do not match up. Oh, and for some reason, 2 lever caps came with this one: one bigger than the other.
It could be a #65. If its a #65 it could be a type 1. Very collectable. We’d need better pictures. The blade would not be original.

-- Master hand plane hoarder. - http://timetestedtools.net

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Holbs

1379 posts in 1496 days


#4 posted 05-15-2015 01:49 PM

glad to see identifying the visible parts alone, is not 100% accurate to identify these planes. yes, cleanup will happen tonite or this weekend. Hopeful to see stamped nomenclature when done. As if it matters anyways because they all will be cleaned up, sharpened and ready for general use in the end. Doesn’t hurt to keep an eye out for a mysterious enigma rare $500 plane found at an auction :)

-- Yes, my profile picture is of a Carpenter Bee! The name is derived from the Ancient Greek "wood-cutter"

View Deycart's profile

Deycart

444 posts in 1724 days


#5 posted 05-15-2015 03:24 PM

#1 – Chinese clone of a 220. #2 – Stanley made craftsman. I don’t think it is a Sargent, because as far as I know they never made that style of lever cap or mouth adjustment. The mouth should move if has a mouth adjustment lever. It might need some penetrating oil and some light taps. I like to use a flat bladed screwdriver from the top of the plane to push the plate down. Do not try to lever it out from the bottom, you will just crack the thin metal where the blade rest. (I’ve done it :(... ) #3 – Stanley No. 18 #4 – Stanley No. 220. All types of the 65 are low angle planes and have a folded piece of sheet metal for a frog and not a cast piece. The frog on low angle planes fit behind the pillar and on standard angle it is in front. I think the problem is that it has a depth adjuster was taken from a 203 which has the same thread pattern as a 220, but a smaller adjuster wheel. Heck it could be a 203 if it was about 5 1/2 inches long and used the smaller cap.

View Don W's profile

Don W

17971 posts in 2034 days


#6 posted 05-15-2015 05:09 PM

Deycart is right. I guess I can’t do the identifying on my phone. In swear that looked like a Sargent on my phone. Its definitely not.

-- Master hand plane hoarder. - http://timetestedtools.net

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