Tips on achieving this completely matte finish?

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Forum topic by saltcod posted 05-14-2015 07:13 PM 623 views 0 times favorited 3 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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69 posts in 574 days

05-14-2015 07:13 PM

Topic tags/keywords: matte finish

Hey guys!

I discovered West Elm a few nights ago and I got to say — I’m hooked! I want to try and reproduce almost everything on the site!

In my week or so of experimenting with different finishes, I’ve learned a ton! Conditioners, gels, stains, oils, etc. None of what I’ve played with so far have gotten me to this West Elm-like finish that I love so much:

Any advance tips on how they’re getting that pure matte finish? A lot will depend on the wood of course, but any suggestions about what direction I should head in if this is the kind of finish I really like?

I’m thinking this might be a combination between an oil (Danish?) and a paste wax? Or can polyurethane actually be finished to have that buttery matte look? I bought a “satin” poly the other day, and it definitely doesn’t finish to this kind of matte.

Advice welcome! Thanks!

3 replies so far

View BroncoBrian's profile


435 posts in 1380 days

#1 posted 05-14-2015 07:26 PM

I’ll second this question.

The link did not work for me, but I looked it up. I also like the matte or satin finish.

-- Bigfoot tries to take pictures of me

View Yonak's profile


979 posts in 942 days

#2 posted 05-14-2015 07:44 PM

Terry, I tried Zar Antique Flat Polyurethane and it didn’t produce a flat finish so, I’m here to say, don’t expect good results from that. An internet search shows that Rustoleum and General Finishes sell matte / flat finish polyurethanes but I haven’t tried them.

My best results have come from rubbing out regular polyurethane with steel wool. The coarser the steel wool, the flatter the finish but, of course, the scratchier.

View kaerlighedsbamsen's profile


1170 posts in 1135 days

#3 posted 05-14-2015 07:53 PM

Could be a host of different finishes – a lot of them made for industy.
To keep it mid-centyry-style most obvious solution to do in the shop is just boiled liseed oil or danish oild aplied in a lot of layers. The last layers applied with fine steel wool or abrasive paper. Then rubbed with wax. Gives a lovely finish!

Let us know what you decide!

-- "Do or Do not. There is no try." - Yoda

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