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How to make a long board longer?

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Forum topic by CB_Cohick posted 05-13-2015 01:40 PM 1763 views 0 times favorited 19 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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CB_Cohick

460 posts in 716 days


05-13-2015 01:40 PM

Topic tags/keywords: question joining biscuit joiner pocket screw

I am planning to help my son-in-law attach a ledge to a knee wall in his basement finishing project. The ledge will be 15 some feet long, and we will be using some 8 foot long select 1×10 pine from big-box to create the ledge. My question is what will be the best way to join these boards end to end to get the desired length, while minimizing the joint appearance?

My initial thought was to miter the ends perpendicular to the long edge and biscuit and glue the ends together. The problem I’m having with that is figuring out how to set the plate jointer to create the slot. Alternatively, might I be able to pocket screw that joint together from the underneath face? My next idea was to make a mitered cut perpendicular to the top face and glue and biscuit the joint. The plate jointer would be working off of a flat face in that scenario. Or, perhaps I could use a compound mitered cut?

Anyway, how would you guys make two 8 ft boards into a 15 ft board, and make the joint disappear? Thanks in advance.

-- Chris - Would work, but I'm too busy reading about woodwork.


19 replies so far

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MrFid

805 posts in 1369 days


#1 posted 05-13-2015 01:46 PM

I would probably make a scarf joint with a long bevel (like 6 inches deep if you can). This would maximize available gluing surface.

Image Credit: Wikipedia.

EDIT: Then use handplanes or a sander to hide the joint line. Grain match as best you can.

-- Bailey F - Eastern Mass.

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CB_Cohick

460 posts in 716 days


#2 posted 05-13-2015 01:53 PM


I would probably make a scarf joint with a long bevel (like 6 inches deep if you can). This would maximize available gluing surface.

- MrFid

Yes! Thank you for putting a label on the joint for me. I am learning all the time on this site. Next question then is how would you cut a suitable scarf joint on a wide/thin board, 1×10 in this case?

EDIT: We will not have access to a large band saw.

-- Chris - Would work, but I'm too busy reading about woodwork.

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CB_Cohick

460 posts in 716 days


#3 posted 05-13-2015 02:07 PM

How about that search function, lol. Preliminary results suggest I can clamp the two boards together and make a long beveled cut with a handsaw. Better practice that one a few times first.

-- Chris - Would work, but I'm too busy reading about woodwork.

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MrFid

805 posts in 1369 days


#4 posted 05-13-2015 02:17 PM

Depends on what tools you do have access to. If you have a handsaw and handplanes, you could rough cut the angle with your saw, then plane them flat. If you go this route, then align the boards according to this diagram:

Image Credit: me.

Then plane the bevels flat (with either handplane, power plane, or sander of some kind) so that when you rotate the upper board to its correct alignment as shown with the arrow you get a nice, tight joint with a flat, long board. Test this technique first on some scrap as it takes a little practice especially with a wide 1×10. Also, this same technique can be used to glue up a panel of boards edge to edge using a jointer plane. I use it all the time, but trying to keep the plane as perpendicular as possible to the face of the board. However, if you are off from perpendicular, the angles will match and the panel will still come out flat.

Good luck!

-- Bailey F - Eastern Mass.

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MrFid

805 posts in 1369 days


#5 posted 05-13-2015 02:19 PM

Haha didn’t see your reply when I started typing. Looks like you found the solution on your own. The key to making the handsaw cut will be that you cut straight down. Don’t let the cut meander, and then clean it up really nicely with planes.

-- Bailey F - Eastern Mass.

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Nubsnstubs

826 posts in 1195 days


#6 posted 05-13-2015 02:22 PM

Even after being in the WW business for 40 years, I’ve never done that much angle on that joint. Baseboards, crown moldings and such, but the way I would do it is to lay your boards together in the 15” orientation, clamp them at the overlap, and proceed with the angle of your choice, and cut with with whatever tool you choose, and cut it. I prefer electrical tools, but for that angle pictured, a handsaw would be better. Even if you went crooked or wobbly on the cut, when you put the two pieces together for glue, they would be a good fit. ............. Jerry (in Tucson)

-- Jerry (in Tucson)

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MrFid

805 posts in 1369 days


#7 posted 05-13-2015 03:00 PM

Right you can obviously go with a lesser (or larger, depending on your perspective) angle, but the more of a bevel you cut the further the joint will be from end grain to end grain. If it’s to be under stress, I’d say more angle is better. For moldings I would also cut the scarf shallower.

-- Bailey F - Eastern Mass.

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mramseyISU

419 posts in 1010 days


#8 posted 05-13-2015 03:36 PM

You need one of these.

-- Trust me I'm an engineer.

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bigblockyeti

3668 posts in 1186 days


#9 posted 05-13-2015 03:46 PM

Have you considered making a finger joint?

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Smitty_Cabinetshop

13734 posts in 2083 days


#10 posted 05-13-2015 03:52 PM

I’d probably use 1×4 select and laminate those, staggering butt joints accordingly. Then there wouldn’t be one stand-out joint…

-- Don't anthropomorphize your handplanes. They hate it when you do that. -- OldTools Archive --

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CB_Cohick

460 posts in 716 days


#11 posted 05-13-2015 04:00 PM



Have you considered making a finger joint?

- bigblockyeti

I have been reading of others using finger joints for this type of application. I would need to build a jig for my router to get that to work, which would be worthwhile whether I end up using that type of joint or the scarf joint.

-- Chris - Would work, but I'm too busy reading about woodwork.

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MT_Stringer

2853 posts in 2696 days


#12 posted 05-13-2015 04:23 PM

I like the ideas others have proposed about clamping the boards together and making one cut. If I were to do it, I would clamp a straight edge such as a framing square or even a thin board say 1/4 or 1/2 inch as a guide so you get a 90 deg crosscut with a circular saw. Cut at a 45 deg angle. Use several layers of painters tape and tape all around the joint area so it will help minimize any tear out. Of course, a good sharp blade will really help such as this one. I have it on my saw and it makes nice cuts.
Here is the blade.

http://www.homedepot.com/p/Diablo-7-1-4-in-x-60-Tooth-Fine-Finish-Saw-Blade-D0760R/100627136?keyword=diablo+saw+blade+7+1%2F4+inch+60

Hope this helps.

Example…hard maple table top cut to width and length using Makita 7 1/4 inch circular saw and the Freud Diablo blade mentioned above.

-- Handcrafted by Mike Henderson - Channelview, Texas

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TheFridge

5765 posts in 951 days


#13 posted 05-13-2015 04:32 PM

Or half lap?

-- Shooting down the walls of heartache. Bang bang. I am. The warrior.

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DKV

3940 posts in 1969 days


#14 posted 05-13-2015 04:38 PM

Make the joint the best you can and then throw a pillow on it. Works every time…

-- This is a Troll Free zone.

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Ghidrah

667 posts in 687 days


#15 posted 05-14-2015 01:52 AM

I’d begin with checking the boards for cup, roll and crown. You can deal with cup and roll by applying cauls to flatten but crown will have to be ripped to straighten both 1st. You can get away with much shorter scarf joint, 1 1/2” is fine, I’d glue and clamp the joint then sand it to your liking before marking and cutting to length.

-- I meant to do that!

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