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can I use titebond II for cutting boards since is water resistant?

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Forum topic by Jorge Velez posted 05-13-2015 01:33 AM 3116 views 0 times favorited 19 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Jorge Velez

356 posts in 2425 days


05-13-2015 01:33 AM

I have a question for you guys out there more experience than me.

can I use titebond II for cutting boards since is water resistant?

Your valuable imput is mucho appreciated.

-- Jorge Velez, Guadalajara, Mexico.


19 replies so far

View Ghidrah's profile

Ghidrah

667 posts in 1061 days


#1 posted 05-13-2015 01:46 AM

I used yellow Elmer’s glue on the 1st oak board I made somewhere around 35 yrs ago, its still together, it sits in hot soapy water to get cleaned and drip dries. No cracks splits checks or credit cards, I soak it in mineral oil maybe every 10 yrs or so.

-- I meant to do that!

View Jim B's profile

Jim B

58 posts in 1069 days


#2 posted 05-13-2015 01:50 AM

Titebond’s website says both II and III are safe for food contact and says they are both good for cutting boards too.

http://www.titebond.com/product.aspx?id=2ef3e95d-48d2-43bc-8e1b-217a38930fa2
http://www.titebond.com/product.aspx?id=e8d40b45-0ab3-49f7-8a9c-b53970f736af

I made my first cutting board 6 years ago using III and have had no issues with it. Assuming you are not planning on submerging your cutting board in water, I suppose you could get away with II. But I’d use III just to be safe. Just a couple dollars more. The added open assembly time of III vs II may also be beneficial when trying to clamp up the amount of pics typical used in a cutting board.

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Mario

140 posts in 3235 days


#3 posted 05-13-2015 02:26 AM

Jorge, any PVA glue will do fine as long as your board is soundly built. Cutting board life will depend on care and cleaning method involved more than anything else.

View paxorion's profile

paxorion

1107 posts in 1885 days


#4 posted 05-13-2015 02:12 PM

I’ve used both Titebond II and III. Both work fine for cutting boards.

-- paxorion

View SirIrb's profile

SirIrb

1239 posts in 1070 days


#5 posted 05-13-2015 02:13 PM

I use II.

-- Don't blame me, I voted for no one.

View bonesbr549's profile

bonesbr549

1445 posts in 2906 days


#6 posted 05-13-2015 03:00 PM



I used yellow Elmer s glue on the 1st oak board I made somewhere around 35 yrs ago, its still together, it sits in hot soapy water to get cleaned and drip dries. No cracks splits checks or credit cards, I soak it in mineral oil maybe every 10 yrs or so.

- Ghidrah

Same here. I’ve got the one I made my mom in shop class from 79. I think it was just plain old elmers glue.

Still holding fine and strong after all these years!

-- Sooner or later Liberals run out of other people's money.

View Kyle Nelson's profile

Kyle Nelson

52 posts in 1153 days


#7 posted 05-13-2015 06:39 PM

I’ve used Elmers and am currently testing out Titebond II. So far so good, but I’ve only been making them for a year or so.

View bondogaposis's profile

bondogaposis

4482 posts in 2190 days


#8 posted 05-13-2015 09:55 PM

I always use TB III now. I made my daughter a CB w/ TB II and of course she ran it through he dishwasher and while it still held together it warped bad and looked like it would not survive another trip through the dishwasher. So you never know what will happen to a board once it is out of your hands. I don’t like putting my name on things that may fall apart even if it is through abuse, so now I use TB III on them all. It doesn’t cost more, so why not?

-- Bondo Gaposis

View Jorge Velez's profile

Jorge Velez

356 posts in 2425 days


#9 posted 05-14-2015 12:34 AM

thank you every one for your comments on this!

my inquiry is due to the lack of water prove glues in Mexico, besides poliuretane glue there are no water prove wood glue, and the only one I can get is tite bond I & II, which BTW is very expensive, and I happen to travel to USA this wk from May-11 to 18 and plan to purchase the glue, but in MEx I cant get it.

again thks for your comments! I’ll try with tite bond II and when able to have acces to III will take advantage.

-- Jorge Velez, Guadalajara, Mexico.

View Ghidrah's profile

Ghidrah

667 posts in 1061 days


#10 posted 05-14-2015 12:37 AM

I don’t know if the one I spoke of is big, normal or small, 1.5625” X 13.5” X 15.5”, but I made a bunch for a guy (30/40) around 06/07, (his design) about 13/16 thick mixed species, (maple walnut oak long grain no end grain) he then used his multi axis router syst. and carved juice grooves, finger grabs and the customers name. He never made a 2nd order, so maybe the skinny weensy boards don’t hold up as well.

-- I meant to do that!

View isu1977's profile

isu1977

42 posts in 2712 days


#11 posted 12-12-2017 03:17 PM

I am making cutting boards for Christmas gifts using Tite Bond II. I read where you are not supposed to submerge the cutting board in water or place it in a dish washer because it will soften the glue and thus the board will fall apart. But that said, what will all the oil do to the glue that soaks in. We’re told to apply oil until the boards won’t except any more. Just wondering how this will effect the glue bonding everything together. My cutting boards are an 1 1/2” thick.

-- Cy - Des Moines, IA

View ArtMann's profile

ArtMann

690 posts in 655 days


#12 posted 12-12-2017 03:31 PM

If you soak a wooden cutting board overnight in mineral oil, it probably won’t penetrate even 1/8 inch. It may, however, prevent water from soaking in and dissolving the glue.

View LittleShaver's profile

LittleShaver

208 posts in 458 days


#13 posted 12-12-2017 05:18 PM

The last end grain cutting board I made was about 1 3/4 thick and maybe 12×18 of maple and cherry. Over the course of a week, it soaked up an entire pint of mineral oil. Full penetration, the oil was weeping out the other side. Used Titebond III for longer open time and water resistance.

-- Sawdust Maker

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ArtMann

690 posts in 655 days


#14 posted 12-12-2017 05:35 PM

That is an interesting claim. Forgive me if I am skeptical but I have done cross sections of mineral oil soaked Maple before and I was unable to ever get penetration in excess of a few 32’s of an inch. Wood is just not that porous. There is a reason why pressure treated lumber must be vacuum and pressure treated to get any amount of penetration.

View AlaskaGuy's profile

AlaskaGuy

3661 posts in 2148 days


#15 posted 12-12-2017 06:24 PM

Yes you can.

Elmer’s yellow carpenter glue is what I have on my 10 year old end grain cutting board. I don’t soak it or put in in the dishwasher

-- Alaskan's for Global warming!

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