LumberJocks

Beveled Cross Cuts on 12" ply

  • Advertise with us

« back to Woodworking Skill Share forum

Forum topic by Don46 posted 08-18-2009 04:03 AM 2402 views 0 times favorited 6 replies Add to Favorites Watch
View Don46's profile

Don46

43 posts in 3069 days


08-18-2009 04:03 AM

I’m building a basement wine cellar with a stack of bins with diagonal “X”s inside two upright cabinet. You see them in restaurants with lots of the same kind of wine in each triangular bin.
I have a table saw with a cross cut sled, which I just put together. I’ve used it for crosscutting all the upright and shelf components. It is all being made out of 3/4 inch red oak ply.
Now, for the diagonals, let’s call them, I would like to give them a bevel cut. I will have stiles all around the cabinet so I probably could just cut the diagonals at 90s, fit them in and cover up the joint. But I am trying to learn and improve my woodworking skills, so I’d like to bevel cut the diagonals.

Important, the diagonal shelves will be 12” deep.

What is the best way to handle this part of my project:
adapt the cross cut sled for bevel cuts (a local woodworker suggested I make an insert-able bevel cut strip and another for the usual 90 degree cuts)

Use a miter saw: I have a 10 inch miter saw; would I need to buy a sliding miter saw that can cut 12 or more inches across?

—Don

-- --Don, Columbia, SC


6 replies so far

View Waldschrat's profile

Waldschrat

505 posts in 2902 days


#1 posted 08-18-2009 07:36 PM

I would cut the 45° angles on the table saw using using the sled if you got one. If you can tilt your saw 45 degrees that is. I assume you can since mosts saws now a days can do this. But since normally the blade can tilt only 1 direction (certian saws can tilt both ways.) Just remeber that if you are using your sled, and it has to be super exact that you must check the accuracy or rather the “toe out” (thats what I will call it here for lack of a better word), of your sled. Normally sleds are very minimally toed out to the left, like a couple of 10ths of a millimeter, as compared with the fence. The fence should be exactly parallel to the blade, but if you have a full length sled, it should not be 100% just like say 99.5% parallel, which can mess up sometimes if its over a longer length or exacting work.

If you are not sure, and want to use the fence, Take a spare or scrap flat plywood or hardboard, does not need be thick, just enough so that when you cut the angle, that when you turn it around and lay it face down, the sharp edge of the angle does not slip under the small gap in the fence where it meets the table of the saw. This is proabably best method, now thinking about it, because it sounds like you have rather short or smaller pieces.

good luck, hope I was helpfull!

-- Nicholas, Cabinet/Furniture Maker, Blue Hill, Maine

View Don46's profile

Don46

43 posts in 3069 days


#2 posted 08-18-2009 08:51 PM

The diagonal pieces will be about 33 inches long (I had to dust off my algebra to get the Pythagorean theorum working for me here—A sq + bsq = C sq … then of course I measured it on the actual piece I’ve constructed so far!). It would be too long to cut without a sled I would think.

I have a Powermatic 64a, which does tilt to the left, and I’ve checked the blade and it seems to be accurately aligned and all.

I would like to either adapt the sled I’m using or build a second one for 45 degree bevel cuts (not sure when I’ll ever use this cut again, come to think of it.) Also, I now realize the squares I have already built are not exactly square so the diagonals will have to be cut at not quite 45 degrees. I’m new at this and I think I forgot to account for the thickness of the ply. But this is not going to be a big problem to work around (I may be eating these words in a few days).

-- --Don, Columbia, SC

View Kent Shepherd's profile

Kent Shepherd

2718 posts in 2753 days


#3 posted 08-18-2009 09:29 PM

http://lumberjocks.com/projects/17458

Check out my table saw sled. I think it does what you’re looking for. Maybe you could adapt your sled for the insert.
Good Luck

-- http://shepherdtoolandsupply.com/

View Don46's profile

Don46

43 posts in 3069 days


#4 posted 08-18-2009 11:30 PM

That is an impressive piece of work Kent. It looks as though you have a removable strip spanning your saw blade cut.
I’m wondering how I would make the cuts necessary to create a similar insert. I don’t want to dismantle the sled. Should I cut out the strip with a circular saw using a straight edge guide? Then create another insert and make the blade opening for it with the blade at the proper angle?

-- --Don, Columbia, SC

View Kent Shepherd's profile

Kent Shepherd

2718 posts in 2753 days


#5 posted 08-19-2009 03:19 PM

I hope this helps. My insert is 1/4” MDF, and yes it is removeable. You might be able to use a router with a straight bit using an edge guide on the sled. Route 1/4” deep for the insert. The width would be enough to allow for the saw bevel plus room for the screws. I know you can’t get close to the fence because of the router base. I have a Bosch Colt Router. With it’s small base you could get closer than a regular size router.
The chisel the remainder. Not a real easy way to do this, but it should work. Not seeing your sled, I’m guessing based on standard type sleds. If yours is 3/4” thick you’ll have 1/2” left. You could then bring your blade up through the sled at the angle you need. All this said, if this is a one time project, it might be just as easy to make a simple new sled. I designed mine from the start to be versatile.

Let me know if I can clarify something.

-- http://shepherdtoolandsupply.com/

View Julian's profile

Julian

880 posts in 2992 days


#6 posted 08-19-2009 03:30 PM

For the diagonal wine racks I have done them in the past with straight cuts, and not miters. I used one full length piece with the other two pieces attached with bisquuts, and just applied a 3/8 thick edge banding on the face of solid wood that was mitered in the middle for the effect.

-- Julian, Park Forest, IL

Have your say...

You must be signed in to reply.

DISCLAIMER: Any posts on LJ are posted by individuals acting in their own right and do not necessarily reflect the views of LJ. LJ will not be held liable for the actions of any user.

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

HomeRefurbers.com