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Designing a Plaque

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Forum topic by John R. posted 09-10-2007 06:50 PM 1721 views 1 time favorited 8 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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John R.

71 posts in 2663 days


09-10-2007 06:50 PM

As part of a plan to make some plaques to mount my deer anlters, I was wondering if anyone could give me tips on just how I go about getting my plaque design from paper to wood? Actually, I need help getting them on paper too! I know what I want, and can sketch it on a piece of paper, but now it is time to make it the “actual size” I want to use. I took three years of mechanical drawing in high school, and I was thinking of getting some sort of drafting table, or something like that, but don’t know if there is an easier way – perhaps with software, or something? Once I get it on paper to the actual size I want, how can I transfer that to a pattern to use a band saw to cut what I need? Any helpful tips would be GREATLY appreciated.

Thanks in advance!

-- John R. - "With God, all things are possible"


8 replies so far

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Thos. Angle

4438 posts in 2709 days


#1 posted 09-10-2007 07:00 PM

On things like this I draw the pattern on Illustration board and cut it out with an Exacto knife. I can sand the illustration board if I need to smooth an edge. I then tranfer the pattern to 1/2 mdf by tracing around it. I then carefully cut this out on the bandsaw and clean up the edge with sanders. Disc and Delta BOSS. I then trace around the template I’ve just created on the real wood. Then I cut the pattern out on the bandsaw leaving about an 1/8 inch all around. I then attach the template with double sided tape to the workpiece and use a pattern routing bit in a router table to clean up the edge and duplicate the template. With all those deer horns this seems like the way to go.

-- Thos. Angle, Jordan Valley, Oregon

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John R.

71 posts in 2663 days


#2 posted 09-10-2007 07:04 PM

So, the illustration board is basically a large piece of thicker type of paper? Or is this very thin wood…?

-- John R. - "With God, all things are possible"

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Thos. Angle

4438 posts in 2709 days


#3 posted 09-10-2007 08:47 PM

Illustration board is a special art cardboard which is availabe in art stores. It is made for drawing with pencils or pens. You could do the same thing with poster board but it isn’t dense enough to make a good pattern. I always have it in the shop to do patterns for the saddle shop. I can then draw a carving pattern right on my cut out pattern. The advantage is that it will hold up to repeated tracing around on work pieces. For your purposes get the cheapest.

-- Thos. Angle, Jordan Valley, Oregon

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John R.

71 posts in 2663 days


#4 posted 09-10-2007 09:49 PM

Excellent, I will get my hands on some ASAP. Sounds like it will be needed again and again. Thanks for the help!

-- John R. - "With God, all things are possible"

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jockmike2

10635 posts in 2993 days


#5 posted 09-11-2007 10:58 AM

If you check out my latest project I posted John, I did a Euro mount a few months ago using oak burl and a polymer epoxy. I run the burl through the planner and got it smooth then poured on the epoxy, then mounted the antlers. Very fast and easy, and cheap. jockmike2

-- (You just have to please the man in the Mirror) Mike from Michigan -

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jockmike2

10635 posts in 2993 days


#6 posted 09-11-2007 03:44 PM

example of deerhead mount

-- (You just have to please the man in the Mirror) Mike from Michigan -

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John R.

71 posts in 2663 days


#7 posted 09-11-2007 06:18 PM

Michael, that’s quite the mount! Thanks for sharing it. I think the rack looks much better than a clock!

-- John R. - "With God, all things are possible"

View Woodminer's profile

Woodminer

69 posts in 2684 days


#8 posted 09-24-2007 11:05 PM

Hey John R,

Sorry I’m late to the party on this one.

I note that you’re planning to cut your plaques on a bandsaw. If you “draw” or scan your plan into your computer, and presuming that you have access to a printer, you can always just print out a new one. Glue it on with spray glue and cut ‘er out. Works the same with scroll saw type patterns.

Nice thing about this is that you can add any instructions or notes to yourself that you’d care to keep. Router bit # that you’ve used to finish the edge, grain direction that particularly appealed to you, finishes that worked or didn’t, any number of things.

And, if you are a good computer user, you back up your files occasionally to a CD or DVD so that when the inevitable happens, you still have your records. That and a paper backup in your files. 8^)

-- Dean, Missouri

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