LumberJocks

Blade or arbor runout?

  • Advertise with us

« back to Power Tools, Hardware and Accessories forum

Forum topic by AAANDRRREW posted 05-11-2015 12:55 PM 833 views 0 times favorited 16 replies Add to Favorites Watch
View AAANDRRREW's profile

AAANDRRREW

111 posts in 632 days


05-11-2015 12:55 PM

Hi All,
I have an odd issue with my brand new delta 36-725.

When I got it I left the stock 42T blade in it for the first few cuts. I noticed when I started the saw and it was accelerating, there appeared to be the slightest wobble in the blade. Once it was up to speed it looked like it was spinning square. I then replaced it with a 80T marples. I had to square the blade to the miter slot afterwards because the blade was “nipping” the left hand side (opposide of the fence at the time) of the blade on the rear as I passed stock through it. Everything has been fine since and I haven’t noticed this wobble at startup.

Now, I just purchased a Diablo 42T combo blade. I was ripping some pallett wood last night so I put that blade in. I noticed IMMEDIATELY there is some wobble at startup and shutdown. At full speed I don’t see a wobble. Its cutting straight yet as well. My guess is the blade has some runout in it because my Marples didn’t do it? I can live with it for now, but its irritating me. I guess if there is some runout it will still cut straight, just a wider cut kind of like a wobble dado?


16 replies so far

View bbasiaga's profile

bbasiaga

754 posts in 1455 days


#1 posted 05-11-2015 01:08 PM

can you cut a kerf part way in to a piece, then use a caliper or something to measure the width? If you did this with a wobbling blade vs. the non wobbling blade, and compared it to the theoretical kerf size by measuring the cutting surface of the blade, it would give you a relative indication of how much wobble there is or isn’t at full speed. Just thinking off the top of my head here. Wouldn’t be exact, just indicative, as I’m sure a perfectly true blade with an 1/8” cutter may not leave exactly a 1/8” kerf.

From what I can tell, if the cut is straight, and still square enough for your needs, then it doesn’t matter if the blade wobbles a lot. It will not leave a super clean surface if the wobble is great, so it may require some extra tending to prior to finishing.

-Brian

-- Part of engineering is to know when to put your calculator down and pick up your tools.

View bonesbr549's profile

bonesbr549

1176 posts in 2527 days


#2 posted 05-11-2015 02:26 PM

I would think it’s the blade but to be sure, use a magnetic base and caliper(avail cheap at grizzly). Measure run-out at the arbor flange, not the blade. If she’s runnin true then indeed it’s the blade.

In the end, if it’s cutting square, I’d not sweat it. Are you having problem with square crosscuts & parallel rips?

-- Sooner or later Liberals run out of other people's money.

View AAANDRRREW's profile

AAANDRRREW

111 posts in 632 days


#3 posted 05-11-2015 03:35 PM

I sure hope and think its the blade. I will try the caliper method.

Is it common to get cheaper blades like a diablo with runout like this?

And I do believe it’s cutting square, but hard to tell when you’re cutting crapp pallet wood to start with. On the one long piece, i believed it was off about 1/16 over a 4” line, but that could be my fence or my skill coming into play as well.

View Firewood's profile

Firewood

93 posts in 1094 days


#4 posted 05-11-2015 04:25 PM

If it is arbor runout, you may see more wobble once you fire it up with a 3/4” Dado stack. If it’s brand new I would open a case with Delta. That should at least get you a new blade

-- Mike - Eagle, WI

View AAANDRRREW's profile

AAANDRRREW

111 posts in 632 days


#5 posted 05-11-2015 04:27 PM

Well, I don’t care about the original Delta blade… I just am worried my saw is goobered. I think it may be the diablo blade… I don’t recall the marples doing it – I will check again tonight when I get home.

Also, i read somewhere about over-tightening the nut… I’m not sure how tight is tight enough or too tight… maybe thats my issue.

View Redoak49's profile

Redoak49

1936 posts in 1448 days


#6 posted 05-12-2015 01:34 AM

One thing I do in a case like this is to measure the run out not the blade with a dial caliper. Then mark the arbor and blade and using the marks rotate the blade 90 degrees and measure the run out. If it is the blade the run out will follow the mark on the blade. If it is the arbor, it will follow the arbor mark.

I hope it is the blade….good luck with it.

View AAANDRRREW's profile

AAANDRRREW

111 posts in 632 days


#7 posted 05-12-2015 02:56 AM

so…I swapped my marples blade in tonight and it spun true. I put the diablo blade back in and tightened it up and it spun true as well. I did verify the runout by eye before I removed the diablo blade and it was CONSIDERABLY better the 2nd time around. I must not have had it sitting just right on the arbor or something. I guess its good news, but odd that itd be that far out.

I did check my alignmet to the miter slot again and it needed adjustment. Either I’m not real good at getting it spot on because I seem to have to do this with every blade change….

View TheFridge's profile

TheFridge

5764 posts in 946 days


#8 posted 05-12-2015 03:34 AM

Try lapping the arbor washer and just snugging the nut just tight and not OMG it’s tight. Though it maybe frowned upon, I just hold the blade with my hand and tighten. Have never had any problems.

-- Shooting down the walls of heartache. Bang bang. I am. The warrior.

View AAANDRRREW's profile

AAANDRRREW

111 posts in 632 days


#9 posted 05-12-2015 01:47 PM

Can someone describe or point me in the direction of how to lap my arbor washer? I know how to do it on a motorcycle valve seat but not this washer :)

View Shadowrider's profile

Shadowrider

183 posts in 669 days


#10 posted 05-12-2015 02:51 PM

You can use a piece or glass or granite and lay a piece of sandpaper on it. Sand the face of your washer in a figure 8 pattern. At least that’s one way.

View MrRon's profile

MrRon

3926 posts in 2703 days


#11 posted 05-12-2015 04:09 PM

When the blade is spinning down, what you are seeing is the alternate set of the teeth in slow motion, so it looks like it is wobbling; first to one side, then the other. At full speed, the teeth become a blur. Putting a dial indicator on the plate of the blade will tell you if the blade/arbor is wobbling. If yes, take the blade off and put the DI on the arbor washer face.

View AAANDRRREW's profile

AAANDRRREW

111 posts in 632 days


#12 posted 05-12-2015 04:13 PM

MrRon, I agree with you. I saw what you described last night AFTER it improved. Before I touched anything, it was definitely runout issue. I may have overtightened the nut some. Kinda wish they gave you a torque spec.

View TheFridge's profile

TheFridge

5764 posts in 946 days


#13 posted 05-12-2015 04:30 PM

I think it a good idea to lap the washer on a brand new saw. It eliminates one potential problem with very little effort involved. A cheap tekton dial indicator and base off of amazon will do the trick. Harbor freight indicator will prob work but I still don’t trust anything from harbor freight involving precision measurements.

-- Shooting down the walls of heartache. Bang bang. I am. The warrior.

View Rick M's profile (online now)

Rick M

7905 posts in 1840 days


#14 posted 05-12-2015 04:51 PM

Buy a dial indicator, they are worth the investment. Then you can stop guessing and check.


View on YouTube

-- http://thewoodknack.blogspot.com/

View AAANDRRREW's profile

AAANDRRREW

111 posts in 632 days


#15 posted 05-12-2015 04:53 PM

Dial indicator is in the works. I would have many uses other than woodworking too. Just don’t have it in hand yet.

showing 1 through 15 of 16 replies

Have your say...

You must be signed in to reply.

DISCLAIMER: Any posts on LJ are posted by individuals acting in their own right and do not necessarily reflect the views of LJ. LJ will not be held liable for the actions of any user.

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

HomeRefurbers.com