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Anyone ever-used outdoor oil on a deck?

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Forum topic by boston_guy posted 05-10-2015 10:35 PM 2620 views 0 times favorited 29 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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boston_guy

144 posts in 1609 days


05-10-2015 10:35 PM

Since I have to put on a clear coat sealer when I finish staining my deck, I’m wondering whether I can use an outdoor oil such as the one below for I’d much rather use a cloth than a brush:

https://generalfinishes.com/retail-products/exterior-finishes/outdoor-oil#.VU_bZ2Zey2w

General Finishes has a product called Arm-R-Seal Oil & Urethane Topcoat Satin:

https://generalfinishes.com/retail-products/oil-base-top-coats/arm-r-seal-urethane-topcoat#.VU_chGZey2w

I used it after I stained my kitchen cabinets and loved it for it’s so easy to use.


29 replies so far

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pjones46

986 posts in 2102 days


#1 posted 05-11-2015 12:53 AM

I would not use either one.
The first is paraffinic base oils which really do not last that long outside, much like Thompson’s Wood Sealer. Use instead:
Benjamin Moore
Series: Translucent (326)
or
Cabot Australian Timber Oil
Series: 3400

As far as using Arm-R-Seal Oil & Urethane Topcoat Satin; it is not designed for outdoor use. Lacks UV protection as well as other components specifically designed into outside products. More than likly it will turn white over time, flake and peal and then you will have a mess trying to remove it.

There are many other good deck stains out there, remember clear coatings do not offer the same protection as semi-transparent.

-- Respectfully, Paul

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boston_guy

144 posts in 1609 days


#2 posted 05-11-2015 04:16 AM

This is what my neighbor and I are using for staining:

Benjamin Moore Arborcoat
Premium Exterior Stain
Classic Oil Finish
Deck & Siding
Semi-transparent

I was talking about the sealer AFTER we finish staining.

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pjones46

986 posts in 2102 days


#3 posted 05-11-2015 04:45 AM

Your choice is a stain and finish all in one. It is designed to penetrate and protect the wood and color it all in one application. Unlike interior finishes, exterior products over significantly shorter time periods degrade and must be recoated depending on environmental conditions. Assuming you are in the northeast, you will more than likely have to wash the deck and recoat it every couple of years to maintain the wood and color due to wear from weather and traffic on the deck as well as the railings.

Unlike paint, it does not form a film if applied correctly and there is very little chance that it will peel if applied correctly. You will have to maintain it on a somewhat regular basis.

I use the same product on my deck and have to clean and recoat it about every third year.

-- Respectfully, Paul

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boston_guy

144 posts in 1609 days


#4 posted 05-11-2015 05:36 AM

I’m in Boston and we just went through a wicked winter!

1) In other words, you don’t use a top coat after you use what my neighbor and me are using?

2) Do you use a brush?

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pjones46

986 posts in 2102 days


#5 posted 05-11-2015 06:47 AM

I’m in Hamilton, MA. For the spindles of the hand rail I use a lamb’s wool mitt and a brush and a cotton toweling. For the deck I use a long handled lamb’s wool pad for most of it and a brush to cut it in up close to the house. I do small sections at a time and let it soak in for 5 or so minutes then use the unloaded long handled lamb’s wool pad and a rag to wipe off the excess so it does not puddle which gives an evenly consistent coverage. Thats it and no top coat over it.

As there is nothing below my deck which is exposed, any of the stain that falls through the decking floor spaces can fall underneath it without harm. If the deck were over something that had to be protected I would suggest you use clear poly which you could roll up and throw away after the job is done.

-- Respectfully, Paul

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boston_guy

144 posts in 1609 days


#6 posted 05-11-2015 07:05 AM

I’m in Somerville (you’re not that far, in the big scheme of things).

1) I had to google to figure out what is a lamb’s wool mitt. I found photos of it. Do you use this mitt to rub the stain on the spindles/rails?

2) I still don’t know what cotton toweling is or its.

3) There is nothing exposed my deck. The deck covers a black rubber roof.

4) You still haven’t answered whether or not you use a topcoat/sealer after you’re done staining.

This is VERY useful information for me. Thanks!

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Wildwood

1881 posts in 1594 days


#7 posted 05-11-2015 12:48 PM

Here is a sight you might find helpful for basic info. You can also read reviews on different products they have tested. I am partial to oil stain products because do not need a top coat and usually easier to clean and reapply as needed.

http://www.deckstainhelp.com/deck-stains/

We used an opaque stain on my sister’s deck which really masked the #2 or3 treated pine deck she has. That was several years ago and except for foot traffic areas stuff looks okay. She lives in NJ so sees all kinds of weather. She wants to redo the deck with same product. She really needs a new deck!

We used this stuff on neighbor’s big deck last summer and still looking like we just finished.

http://www.homedepot.com/p/Wolman-5-gal-Raincoat-Clear-Oil-Based-Water-Repellent-Sealer-12385/204642362?keyword=wood+deck+oil+stain+sealer#specifications

Only advice can offer other than oil stain sealer whether opaque or transparent look for product that easy to touch up and redo.

-- Bill

View Gene Howe's profile

Gene Howe

8236 posts in 2888 days


#8 posted 05-11-2015 01:59 PM

Check out Sikkens.
The link takes you to the translucent product for pre stained wood. We used a product with a stain in it.
Two coats 5 years ago and it’s just now showing signs of wear on the steps.

-- Gene 'The true soldier fights not because he hates what is in front of him, but because he loves what is behind him.' G. K. Chesterton

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pjones46

986 posts in 2102 days


#9 posted 05-11-2015 02:43 PM

No top coat/sealer over it.

BJ’s club has packages of the white cotton toweling in there automotive department. I always have them in the shop and my wife swipes them for kitchen cleanup use. Basically they are just square hemmed pieces cotton bath towel. I find them better than old tee shirt material for most of my uses.

I assume you did not like the answers you got on your previous post concerning the same application? Remember, you are liable for any damages to other property, so care must be taken, especially if you are dealing with condo applications.

By the way, someone mentioned Sikkens, do not use it as it flakes and peels in one year. Sikkens has a problem with its use on decks per the New England Rep, why, I have no idea. Seems fine for house bodies but not for decks. Several of the local high end builders that I do work for, will not use it as they have had trouble with it every time they have used it.

-- Respectfully, Paul

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boston_guy

144 posts in 1609 days


#10 posted 05-11-2015 03:03 PM

pjones46,

Thanks for getting back to me. No, it’s not that I didn’t like the replies I got on my other thread. I just thought that it would be better to separate the staining part from the finishing/topcoat part. I didn’t want to cause confusion. I really appreciate the advice here and just trying to make it easier for forum members to understand what I’m trying to do.

So if I understand you correctly:

1) The “cotton toweling” is for rubbing the stain onto the wood.

2) The lamb’s wool mitt is also for rubbing the stain onto the wood (spindles and rails).

3) The stain we’re talking about here is this one:

Benjamin Moore Arborcoat
Premium Exterior Stain
Classic Oil Finish
Deck & Siding
Semi-transparent

4) This stain (mentioned in #3 above) does not require a topcoat.

I just want to be clear. Really appreciate your feedback.

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pjones46

986 posts in 2102 days


#11 posted 05-11-2015 03:57 PM

Answers are as follows:

1.Cotton toweling is use to remove/spread out puddles of the unabsorbed stain for consistence of color rather it be on the deck or spindles.

2.The lambs wool mitt is used for irregular surfaces and hard to get at spots on the spindles and handrail, so yes to using it to apply the stain to and on the wood (spindles and rails).

3.Yes the Benjamin Moore Arborcoat is the product you are using and I use.

4.The stain in “3” does “not” require a topcoat; it is an all in one product.

-- Respectfully, Paul

View DMC1903's profile

DMC1903

243 posts in 1787 days


#12 posted 05-11-2015 04:25 PM

I applied numerous coats of general finishes outdoor oil on a patio table top made of Doug Fir, it looked great for a season. The finish started to flake and peel off after our winter had passed,I would not use the outdoor oil again.

The Arm-a-seal is a great finish to use on indoor projscts.

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boston_guy

144 posts in 1609 days


#13 posted 05-11-2015 07:28 PM

Thank you very much, pjones46. Your feedback was really helpful. I’ll inform my neighbor. She has an identical deck, right next to mine.


Answers are as follows:

1.Cotton toweling is use to remove/spread out puddles of the unabsorbed stain for consistence of color rather it be on the deck or spindles.

2.The lambs wool mitt is used for irregular surfaces and hard to get at spots on the spindles and handrail, so yes to using it to apply the stain to and on the wood (spindles and rails).

3.Yes the Benjamin Moore Arborcoat is the product you are using and I use.

4.The stain in “3” does “not” require a topcoat; it is an all in one product.

- pjones46


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boston_guy

144 posts in 1609 days


#14 posted 05-11-2015 07:31 PM

DMC1903,

Thanks for your warning about outdoor oil!

Yes, for kitchen cabinets and any other indoor projects you can’t ask for anything better than this Arm-R-Seal product:

https://generalfinishes.com/retail-products/oil-base-top-coats/arm-r-seal-urethane-topcoat#.VVEDomZey2x


I applied numerous coats of general finishes outdoor oil on a patio table top made of Doug Fir, it looked great for a season. The finish started to flake and peel off after our winter had passed,I would not use the outdoor oil again.

The Arm-a-seal is a great finish to use on indoor projscts.

- DMC1903


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boston_guy

144 posts in 1609 days


#15 posted 05-12-2015 02:32 PM

pjones46,

Yesterday I went to Rockler Woodworking and Hardware and a local paint store popular with painters. Both of them did not have lambswool mitts.

A stupid question. Home Depot has a synthetic painting mitt:

http://www.homedepot.com/p/Linzer-8-in-x-3-8-in-Synthetic-Painting-Mitt-RT363/100168481?keyword=painting+mitt

Do you think this might work for staining the rails or should I definitely use lambswool? Don’t worry, when I ask for advice, any mistakes are my fault. I’m not one of those people who come back crying that, “It was your fault. You told me this would work, blah, blah, blah.” Just asking for your best guess.


Answers are as follows:

1.Cotton toweling is use to remove/spread out puddles of the unabsorbed stain for consistence of color rather it be on the deck or spindles.

2.The lambs wool mitt is used for irregular surfaces and hard to get at spots on the spindles and handrail, so yes to using it to apply the stain to and on the wood (spindles and rails).

3.Yes the Benjamin Moore Arborcoat is the product you are using and I use.

4.The stain in “3” does “not” require a topcoat; it is an all in one product.

- pjones46


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