LumberJocks

three angled boards

  • Advertise with us

« back to Joinery forum

Forum topic by Louis Petrolia posted 05-10-2015 03:50 PM 813 views 0 times favorited 17 replies Add to Favorites Watch
View Louis Petrolia's profile

Louis Petrolia

20 posts in 1297 days


05-10-2015 03:50 PM

I have 3 angled 3/4” pieces of plywood at approx. 22” high x 12” wide.
first piece angled at 30 dgrees left side and 15 degrees right side. One middle piece is angled
at 15 degrees both sides, and third piece angled at 15 degrees left side and right side 30 degrees.

Any suggestions how to clamp and glue these 3 sections. I do not have a kreg pocket hole jig.
Some suggestions about brad stapler etc. Very difficult with these angles. I have tried blocks cut
to these angles to clamp. No. luck. Haven’t started the cabinet just yet until I hear your suggestion.
I have never used a Kreg Poket hole jig either.
certainly could use some expert advice and help in my dilemma.
Thanks
LOUIS PETROLIA


17 replies so far

View jerryminer's profile

jerryminer

528 posts in 906 days


#1 posted 05-10-2015 05:25 PM

I THINK you are talking about an arrangement like this pic (flat angles, not beveled edges). Tack together some scraps to get a place for clamps to get a good purchase.

View RogerM's profile

RogerM

762 posts in 1863 days


#2 posted 05-10-2015 05:39 PM

Louis – From your description I have no idea of what you are trying to clamp up. A few pointers that might help though:

First, butt joints rarely work very well for plywood. If you are doing butt joints some splines or biscuits will help in securing a joint of reasonable strength.

Second, If you are doing butt joints, some fine dry sand sprinkled on the glue between the joining surfaces will reduce the slippage and help in clamping procedures.

Third, If you are going to do some cabinetry invest in one of the more inexpensive pocket hole jigs such as http://www.rockler.com/mini-kreg-jig-pocket-hole-kit. It will save you a lot of grief and time and will pay for itself in a short amount of time.

I hope this has been of some help. Good luck on your project.

-- Roger M, Aiken, SC

View Louis Petrolia's profile

Louis Petrolia

20 posts in 1297 days


#3 posted 05-10-2015 06:35 PM

Thanks Roger
This is not what I am looking for. I am looking for beveled edges. You will note that I indicated the
different degrees on the edges of the 3 pieces. Not angles as you have shown. Sorry I am not too
clear. I do not know how to show a sketch as you indicated. I am not a computer guru. If I was
able to show you, I could sketch a top view to show you the beveled joints as previously indicated.
Thanks again Roger

LOUIS

View waho6o9's profile (online now)

waho6o9

7174 posts in 2041 days


#4 posted 05-10-2015 06:43 PM

Please sketch a top view Louis, thanks.

I’m guessing it’s a base of some sort?

View Louis Petrolia's profile

Louis Petrolia

20 posts in 1297 days


#5 posted 05-10-2015 06:53 PM

Sorry waho609 As I indicated to Roger. I do not know how to sketch on the computer. I am not that
great on the computer. I can only do basics. Rockler.com shows a curved view with a Kreg pocket hole
jig. Gives you an idea what I am talking about.

LOUIS PETROLIA

View waho6o9's profile (online now)

waho6o9

7174 posts in 2041 days


#6 posted 05-10-2015 06:56 PM

Just sketch it on paper

View waho6o9's profile (online now)

waho6o9

7174 posts in 2041 days


#7 posted 05-10-2015 07:16 PM

Something like this?

View Louis Petrolia's profile

Louis Petrolia

20 posts in 1297 days


#8 posted 05-10-2015 07:21 PM

waho609
It is not a base. This is a cabinet. As indicated each piece is 12” wide x 22” high. You are showing
a basic joint using angled cuts which is not exactly what I am asking. I am using authentic butt joints
similar to a joint you would use if something was 30 degrees and two boards to match up properly
would be 15 degrees each. That is an authentic bevel. It is basically a corner type cabinet with
angles in the rear of the cabinet.
Thanks anyway guys. I have searched over the internet for this info. Cannot find any info at all
where someone understands this type of jointing.
LOUIS PETROLIA

View waho6o9's profile (online now)

waho6o9

7174 posts in 2041 days


#9 posted 05-10-2015 07:27 PM

View Daruc's profile

Daruc

459 posts in 597 days


#10 posted 05-10-2015 08:03 PM

Cut your angles, lay them flat and put them together with the points touching each other. Use 2 or 3 strips of masking tape down the seam. Turn the pcs over, put glue into the joints, then close them up. Your tape will be the clamp. All you have to do is run some tape or a clamp from side to side to keep your joint from coming back open until your glue dries.

I’ve never done this myself, but I heard it works real good if you do it right.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wvxLCfnw4YQ

-- -

View AlaskaGuy's profile

AlaskaGuy

2406 posts in 1773 days


#11 posted 05-10-2015 09:39 PM

I’m confused. Does angled mean mitered?

-- Alaskan's for Global warming!

View Kazooman's profile

Kazooman

628 posts in 1417 days


#12 posted 05-10-2015 09:45 PM

There seems to be a lot of confusion as to just what Louis is trying to glue up.

Drawing skills aside, a picture is worth a lot. How about propping up the pieces approximately like they need to be, or getting a helper to hold them, and taking a picture? If you post one I bet you will get several good solutions for your problem.

View AlaskaGuy's profile

AlaskaGuy

2406 posts in 1773 days


#13 posted 05-10-2015 09:45 PM



Cut your angles, lay them flat and put them together with the points touching each other. Use 2 or 3 strips of masking tape down the seam. Turn the pcs over, put glue into the joints, then close them up. Your tape will be the clamp. All you have to do is run some tape or a clamp from side to side to keep your joint from coming back open until your glue dries.

I ve never done this myself, but I heard it works real good if you do it right.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wvxLCfnw4YQ

- woodust


That technique is commonly called “miter folding”.

-- Alaskan's for Global warming!

View jerryminer's profile

jerryminer

528 posts in 906 days


#14 posted 05-11-2015 12:21 AM

One more try. Are you making something like THIS pic?? You should still be able to put together some clamping blocks from scrap. Splines will also help.

View waho6o9's profile (online now)

waho6o9

7174 posts in 2041 days


#15 posted 05-11-2015 12:29 AM

jerryminer for the win!

showing 1 through 15 of 17 replies

Have your say...

You must be signed in to reply.

DISCLAIMER: Any posts on LJ are posted by individuals acting in their own right and do not necessarily reflect the views of LJ. LJ will not be held liable for the actions of any user.

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

HomeRefurbers.com