LumberJocks

Online Source for 1/4" Red Oak Boards?

  • Advertise with us

« back to Wood & Lumber forum

Forum topic by Scottlj posted 05-10-2015 03:13 AM 771 views 0 times favorited 10 replies Add to Favorites Watch
View Scottlj's profile

Scottlj

81 posts in 1183 days


05-10-2015 03:13 AM

So this was a new one for me…

I’m still a novice and there’s this project plan I wanted to build. It caslls for a bunch of 1/4” red oak boards. No big deal, right? Except for one thing. This apparently isn’t a common item at either the big box stores of course, or even my local lumber mill, which is usually pretty good about a variety of specialty woods.

I do not own a bandsaw or a planer, nor can I afford the space for them right now. (And my wife would use either or both on my head if another sizable tool shows up in the garage.)

I’ve searched online, but only found a couple of places that have this, (Rocker apparently has some 5” x 48” boards), and there’s some others. But wondering if anyone has a favorite source. I’m in CT by the way, so if anyone knows anywhere local, that would be even better.

Thanks for any suggestions.

Scott


10 replies so far

View AlaskaGuy's profile

AlaskaGuy

2406 posts in 1774 days


#1 posted 05-10-2015 03:42 AM

Well gee wiz…...other than you want 1/4 thick, what width and lengths do you need?

-- Alaskan's for Global warming!

View Scottlj's profile

Scottlj

81 posts in 1183 days


#2 posted 05-10-2015 12:16 PM

At least 4” x 48” for this particular project. So here’s one source:
http://www.rockler.com/red-oak-by-the-piece-1-4-thickness

But I’m curious as to if there’s other sources experienced folks trust, both for overall quality and price. I’d love to be able to resaw, plane and joint my own, but again, just not going to happen for now. Typically, I end up spending a little more for S4S boards due to lacking some more dress up tools. But between table saw, hand and power planers and router table, etc., I somehow manage. Until now.

View tomsteve's profile

tomsteve

394 posts in 684 days


#3 posted 05-10-2015 01:31 PM

Ocooch hardwoods. Woodcraft and rockier,too.
Weird. Every BORG and big blue I’ve been to has 1/4” red oak.
You may want to check you local yellow pages for lumber suppliers. Searching for hardwood lumber, rough sawn lumber, sawmills in the YP has found me local places.

View Scottlj's profile

Scottlj

81 posts in 1183 days


#4 posted 05-10-2015 01:43 PM

I’ll do that. Going to check out Ring’s End next week, which usually has solid selection. They may actually have it, and I just was looking in the wrong spot. Or maybe they’d know. I was in a rush and didn’t have time to ask last time I was there.

I also used this to try to find what’s around: http://www.woodfinder.com/

It could be I’ll end up using plywood after all for some of it. It’s just I kind of like all real wood. I know people use plywood everyday in every way. And I did do one cabinet in plywood as it was to just be painted, and it came out great. Maybe just scratching up thin plywood veneer scares me a little. This is the piece I want to build, and it calls for 1/4” wide in the back and sides, which gets slotted into grooves.

You can see the ship lapped back pieces, which I think look nice. And the sides are wood. But I could use plywood for the back and sides. Maybe use space balls or panel buddy foam in the slots to keep centered and allow for expansion; just like panel doors. (Though I understand that plywood would be reasonably dimensionally stable, I still don’t want it rattling around.)

View HerbC's profile

HerbC

1592 posts in 2324 days


#5 posted 05-10-2015 02:38 PM

If you have table saw and planer, you can use the tablesaw to resaw 3/4” thick oak to wind up with 1/4” thick after the wood is planed. Use a good thin kerf rip blade on the table saw and saw blade height of slightly less than halve the width of the boards. Use a tall rip fence. Double check the blade and fence are both truly perpendicular to the saw top. Leave a strip that’s 1/8” to 1/4” wide connecting the two halves of the board, then use a good handsaw to separate the halves. Finish up by using the planer to smooth the thin boards.

Sounds like and is a lot of work but it does do the job. I recently resawed enough cypress boards to make wainscot paneling and false beams for the renovation of our living room and dining room. Many of the boards for the beams were 12 to 18 feet long…

Above all, don’t forget to…

Be Careful!

Herb

-- Herb, Florida - Here's why I close most messages with "Be Careful!" http://lumberjocks.com/HerbC/blog/17090

View Scottlj's profile

Scottlj

81 posts in 1183 days


#6 posted 05-10-2015 05:02 PM

I have a nice portable table saw, (Bosch 4100). And it’s well tuned with blade and fence well true. Using my Grrriper, some custom jigs and feather boards I’ve been able to safely use it for a lot of different profiles, but have only ‘re-saw’ a few small pieces. In any case, my planer is just a small hand held, and I can’t justify the space for a real one right now.

What you suggest does sound like a lot of work. But potentially do-able. Thing is, I’m getting better at building some decent looking furniture and other items, but I don’t consider myself a hard core woodworker. I suppose what I’m saying is I’m a little lazy with some tasks and would rather spend a little more and save the 1/2 day it would take to process boards and use that time for building. (yes, spoiled maybe, I know.) Still, it’s good to know that technique if I need it in a pinch.

It’s super impressive you did all that to renovate your living room!

View HerbC's profile

HerbC

1592 posts in 2324 days


#7 posted 05-10-2015 06:39 PM

Well, with those tools I wouldn’t want to do it that way either. I’ve got an older Craftsman 113 series table saw and it handled the job without any real problem. The ripping operation took days and generated four or five large yard trash bags full of sawdust on the table saw. I don’t even want to talk about how much planer chips were generated.

Good luck with your quest.

Be Careful!

Herb

-- Herb, Florida - Here's why I close most messages with "Be Careful!" http://lumberjocks.com/HerbC/blog/17090

View Scottlj's profile

Scottlj

81 posts in 1183 days


#8 posted 05-11-2015 01:11 AM

Seems I’ve dodged the bullet. Old saying… sometimes the best way to solve a problem is avoid it altogether. My wife’s friend, for whom I’m building this bookcase, prefers the less expensive version. So I’m just going to use 1/4” oak plywood for back and sides. Problem solved.

Still, I liked some of the designs I saw for that used 1/4” boards in grooves. So will be keeping an eye out for suppliers anyway.

View tomsteve's profile

tomsteve

394 posts in 684 days


#9 posted 05-12-2015 12:10 PM

I think that with that project it would be best to use ply for back and sides. Oak can expand and contract a lot through the seasons and seems that the thinner it is the more it happens.
If in the future ya get something like this and want to get some pretty sweet panels, look into veneering your own plywood.

View Scottlj's profile

Scottlj

81 posts in 1183 days


#10 posted 05-12-2015 02:18 PM

Agreed. That seems to make sense. I ordered some of the panel buddies for the grooves for the plywood. They’re kind of like the space balls, but I liked the panel buddies better as they seem like they’ll seat the longer boards better, keep them centered and from moving and allow for what little expansion there may be, even with ply. I’ll still stain before assembly; after dry fitting.

I’m going to use my Beadlock loose tenon jig tool for the main joinery. The only thing I haven’t done before is the stopped grooves in the legs to hold the plywood in place. I’d like to use my table saw as that typically seems easiest, but unwise in this case as I’m not going end to end. So I’m thinking I need to sort out how to use ye’ ole’ plunge router with a spiral upcut bit to do this. Just have to figure out how to line it all up first. Definitely will be testing on some scrap first before I ruin any nice oak!

Have your say...

You must be signed in to reply.

DISCLAIMER: Any posts on LJ are posted by individuals acting in their own right and do not necessarily reflect the views of LJ. LJ will not be held liable for the actions of any user.

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

HomeRefurbers.com