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Table saw: When adjusting my blade angle, drive belt won't stay on

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Forum topic by JoshD posted 05-08-2015 10:35 PM 1547 views 0 times favorited 14 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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JoshD

3 posts in 579 days


05-08-2015 10:35 PM

This could be a novice question but I recently inherited this old craftsmen table saw and I am in the process of cutting angled pieces of floor moulding. I feel as is if this table saw is missing something. I adjust the blade angle to 45 degrees but the pulley at the motor remains the same. This won’t work because it will instantly fly off.

Any help would be excellent.


14 replies so far

View Firewood's profile

Firewood

93 posts in 1099 days


#1 posted 05-08-2015 10:50 PM

If this is has not been an issue before, I think I would first look to see if belt alignment is correct when the blade is at 90 deg. Meaning check to be sure your pulled haven’t drifted.

-- Mike - Eagle, WI

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altendky

169 posts in 1675 days


#2 posted 05-08-2015 11:06 PM

I don’t know on the older ones like that but I usually see the motor mounted such that when you tilt the blade the motor tilts with it. My gut says that there is no hope for that belt to stay on with that angle and offset… but I don’t have that much belt experience.

It looks like the motor mount is on a shaft so it could at least slide to the left and eliminate the offset? Then at least it would only have the twist which might be workable.

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TheFridge

5765 posts in 951 days


#3 posted 05-08-2015 11:40 PM

It’s a rigged up saw. It’ll only cut 90 or close to it.

-- Shooting down the walls of heartache. Bang bang. I am. The warrior.

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JoshD

3 posts in 579 days


#4 posted 05-08-2015 11:49 PM

Thanks for all the input so far. I’ll try sliding it over to the left and see if that helps at all

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TheFridge

5765 posts in 951 days


#5 posted 05-08-2015 11:57 PM

It’s not meant to cut bevels with the motor my mounted like that. The motor pulley needs to be inline with arbor pulley by riding on a bracket that it doesn’t look like you have. Maybe get the #s off the saw and cross reference on vintagemachinery.org and OWWM.org to see if you can come up with anything.

-- Shooting down the walls of heartache. Bang bang. I am. The warrior.

View MrUnix's profile

MrUnix

4230 posts in 1664 days


#6 posted 05-09-2015 12:01 AM

Yeah, I think Fridge pegged it… it’s a rigged up stand and the motor has been relocated. The original motor mounting bracket may have been damaged or something – nobody knows what motivates some previous owners to do what they do :)

Here is a similar saw with the proper motor configuration:

(Found at the vintage machinery site)

If you know the model number for the saw, you can get the manual and/or a parts diagram and see how it should be attached and what you might be missing.

Cheers,
Brad

-- Brad in FL - To be old and wise, you must first be young and stupid

View altendky's profile

altendky

169 posts in 1675 days


#7 posted 05-09-2015 01:03 AM

I’m not convinced it’s rigged. Take a look at some of these shots that show the same setup and at least one other ‘option’.

http://www.garagejournal.com/forum/showpost.php?p=2419239&postcount=11
http://shanewhitlock.com/photo/v/misc/craftsmants/

I suspect you might be able to handle the twist so long as it’s well aligned.

Are you sure the blue one isn’t mounted to the shaft with it’s mount bolted to the table?

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TheFridge

5765 posts in 951 days


#8 posted 05-09-2015 01:15 AM

I see. Missing parts. The trunnion bracket should have a bolt or stud that rides in the fork by the motor to move it.

-- Shooting down the walls of heartache. Bang bang. I am. The warrior.

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MrUnix

4230 posts in 1664 days


#9 posted 05-09-2015 01:28 AM

I see. Missing parts. The trunnion bracket should have a bolt or stud that rides in the fork by the motor to move it.

Apparently, the motor doesn’t tilt with the blade, but it slides along with the arbor pulley to keep it somewhat in line… and the belt does a slight twist. But, it does appear there are some missing parts. Here is a diagram from the owners manual for a 103.22160 which looks basically the same, but with the sliding thingie mounted on the stand instead of the saw::

I guess without it hooked up right, you could slide the motor manually to align the pulleys…

The actual model number for that saw would be really, really helpful :)

Cheers,
Brad

-- Brad in FL - To be old and wise, you must first be young and stupid

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runswithscissors

2189 posts in 1490 days


#10 posted 05-09-2015 04:55 AM

Yup. That’s the way my dad’s old C-man worked. Motor slides left when you set the blade to bevel. Kind of a crappy arrangement, but as I recall it worked okay. I think Sears’ propaganda even bragged about the arrangement as some kind of innovation.

-- I admit to being an adrenaline junky; fortunately, I'm very easily frightened

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JoshD

3 posts in 579 days


#11 posted 05-11-2015 01:45 AM

Well for an update, it does move back and forth on that rod. If I move it all the way to the left when using the blade at a 45 degree angle it does work fine even though the belt is a little twisted. I think if I had some of those missing/broken parts it would be even better.

For the small projects that I have I think it will work out. Thanks to all for your input and maybe I will consider getting the right parts for it in the future.

View hhhopks's profile

hhhopks

645 posts in 1842 days


#12 posted 05-11-2015 03:06 AM

Interesting, definitely before my time on the TS. I noticed that my lathe and drill press manuals never mention belt setting where the pulley’s alignment are a mismatch (multiple pulleys on a shaft). The settings always have the pulley’s the arbor aligned with the pulley that is on the motor so that the pulleys of being used are on the same plane. So the number of speed settings is very limited, otherwise the number of speed available would be a lot more. I wonder why that is the case?

-- I'll be a woodworker when I grow up. HHHOPKS

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altendky

169 posts in 1675 days


#13 posted 05-11-2015 03:11 AM

I’m guessing the paired pulley sets like that have fixed spacing between the shafts so you really can’t cross pulleys without changing belt length or adding an idler.

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hhhopks

645 posts in 1842 days


#14 posted 05-11-2015 10:24 AM


I m guessing the paired pulley sets like that have fixed spacing between the shafts so you really can t cross pulleys without changing belt length or adding an idler.

- altendky

It doesn’t apply to the lathe, as the motor is mounted on a hinge plate and the weight of the motor will tighten the belt.

Personally, I think that proper alignment of the belt & pulleys is a preferred practice for a typical saw set up (from the Mechanical view point). Proper alignment should have many benefits:

1. Longer belt life.
2. Less stress on the pulleys and shafts.
3. Keep pulleys/keys from coming loosen.
4. Reduce vibration.
5. Reduce noise level.

I try to keep my saw setup tuned with proper pulley & belt alignment. I am hoping for more up time & to produce better cuts from the saw. What are the safety aspect of things, having a belt coming off as you make a cut? It would be distracting for sure.

-- I'll be a woodworker when I grow up. HHHOPKS

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