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So how much HP does it take to run a Shaper Bit?

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Forum topic by timbertailor posted 05-08-2015 03:05 AM 827 views 0 times favorited 11 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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timbertailor

1591 posts in 884 days


05-08-2015 03:05 AM

I know that it will probably be somewhat reliant on bit diameter, but some minimum numbers would be helpful or more specific info about the effects on speed, etc.

-- Brad, Texas, https://www.youtube.com/user/tonkatoytruck/feed


11 replies so far

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Andre

1018 posts in 1266 days


#1 posted 05-08-2015 06:40 AM

I have a 1.5 hp Grizzly and find the type of wood, depth of cut and how fast you want to go makes the biggest difference. Profile of cutter heads does make some difference also. Ran quite a bit of Birch through my machine
with no problem at all, even doing some in one pass on a 2.5 in. dia. bit. I think the Grizzly machine has a 4.5 in. max dia. capacity.

-- Lifting one end of the plank.

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SirIrb

1239 posts in 691 days


#2 posted 05-08-2015 11:06 AM

There are a few things to take into acct.
spindle size does directly affect the weight of the cutter. So a 1/2” spindle wont happily spin a real heavy insert cutter. Think 3+lbs. Yall correct me if I am wrong. So what is the max cutter weight?

You have amount of cut you will be taking. Stick and cope are not the same as crown or a detailed tall base.

You have the feed you will be pushing. If you have a powerfeeder you never want it to overfeed the machine hp.

So the equation works like this.
Heaviest cutter * sq in of cut youre taking + liner feet per second = hp. Ok, that isnt an equation and I am an engineer who failed algebra 5 times not counting high school and never got a college degree.

I would say that this like all machines the answer is: you will never have too much hp. As stated above, 1.5 is good. But 3 is better. And 5 will make you smile the happy smile. 7.5 will make you wet yourself.

Are you making cabinet doors or crown or handrail?

-- Don't blame me, I voted for no one.

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dhazelton

2322 posts in 1757 days


#3 posted 05-08-2015 12:54 PM

Depends on what you’re going to do with it. Delta Homecraft and old Craftsmans were probably no more than 3/4 – 1 HP. Sharp bits and shallow cuts make that possible.

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timbertailor

1591 posts in 884 days


#4 posted 05-08-2015 01:54 PM

I was looking at some of the more intricate bits for crown mouldings. I have a Milwaukee 5625-20 with 3.5HP or something close in my router table already and was wondering if I could use it to do some of these more intricate moldings.

I did not want to invest in a bit (and some of them are expensive) only to find out that it would take me more passes than I care to take the time to do vs. just buying it already machined.

-- Brad, Texas, https://www.youtube.com/user/tonkatoytruck/feed

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SirIrb

1239 posts in 691 days


#5 posted 05-08-2015 02:32 PM

So you have a router/ router table, not a shaper. is this correct?

In that case I will exit stage left.

-- Don't blame me, I voted for no one.

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DalyArcher

72 posts in 579 days


#6 posted 05-08-2015 04:51 PM

I agree with the above. A router is not a shaper. Making doors with stick and cope bits is one thing, running high profile, heavy, large diameter bits is another. Have you considered a molding head cutter for your tablesaw? I’ve not researched these much, but they seem like an interesting addition to the shop.

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bigblockyeti

3665 posts in 1181 days


#7 posted 05-08-2015 05:06 PM

I too have that Milwaukee router and while as a router it’s very capable, substituting it for a shaper would almost certainly prove disappointing. You may be able to get away with several shallow passes on soft wood that isn’t too wide. Where I worked we had a 7.5hp Invicta shaper with a 1 1/4” 4 speed spindle, and it would swing either a 10” or 12” cutter. It could cut a deep and wide rabbet very fast even in hard wood. It’s just a function of how quickly you want to work.

View timbertailor's profile

timbertailor

1591 posts in 884 days


#8 posted 05-08-2015 05:08 PM



I agree with the above. A router is not a shaper. Making doors with stick and cope bits is one thing, running high profile, heavy, large diameter bits is another. Have you considered a molding head cutter for your tablesaw? I ve not researched these much, but they seem like an interesting addition to the shop.

- DalyArcher

The table saw has about half the power of my router. That seems like a step backwards.

-- Brad, Texas, https://www.youtube.com/user/tonkatoytruck/feed

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timbertailor

1591 posts in 884 days


#9 posted 05-08-2015 06:20 PM



I too have that Milwaukee router and while as a router it s very capable, substituting it for a shaper would almost certainly prove disappointing. You may be able to get away with several shallow passes on soft wood that isn t too wide. Where I worked we had a 7.5hp Invicta shaper with a 1 1/4” 4 speed spindle, and it would swing either a 10” or 12” cutter. It could cut a deep and wide rabbet very fast even in hard wood. It s just a function of how quickly you want to work.

- bigblockyeti

Thank you. That is what I wanted to know. I do not plan to dedicate the table router to JUST large bits, just the occasional use of a larger shaper bit for crown mouldings. I will add this to my watchlist and report back my findings.

-- Brad, Texas, https://www.youtube.com/user/tonkatoytruck/feed

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cabmaker

1506 posts in 2269 days


#10 posted 05-09-2015 02:47 AM

Brad……that router on anything more than a 2 1/4 inch crown profile will be sorta like taking a pocket knife to a gunfight.

A key factor is the total line of engagement in the material at a given moment.

If your not equipped for it, you ll find a large waste factor in crown mold….very large.

Not to mention the need for power feed if you want a quality run of any considerable amount

that long shaft required will have substantial deflection, that is if you have enough beef to keep the material where it needs to be.

Your router bearings will fail prematurely as well.

Get a shaper.

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Shadowrider

183 posts in 669 days


#11 posted 05-09-2015 04:22 AM


I agree with the above. A router is not a shaper. Making doors with stick and cope bits is one thing, running high profile, heavy, large diameter bits is another. Have you considered a molding head cutter for your tablesaw? I ve not researched these much, but they seem like an interesting addition to the shop.

- DalyArcher

The table saw has about half the power of my router. That seems like a step backwards.

- timbertailor

It may seem so but there is more to it than plain HP. The heads he’s talking about will carry a lot more momentum at speed because they are a lot heavier than a big router bit and are turning at a much larger diameter giving them higher surface footage per minute at the cutter tooth. A table saw with a moulding head would cut far better than a router. But does anyone still make those moulding heads for a table saw? I really haven’t looked but may have a use for one if it’s a quality head and various profile cutters are available. I know my 3HP Unisaw would spin any that I’d need.

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