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Math for size of table

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Forum topic by basuraman posted 05-06-2015 08:03 PM 531 views 0 times favorited 5 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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basuraman

25 posts in 2527 days


05-06-2015 08:03 PM

Topic tags/keywords: question

What math do you use to determine how big to make a table.

Do you use a certain size for each chiar and mulitply?

What ratio do you use for length vs width?

Are these silly questions?


5 replies so far

View Daruc's profile

Daruc

459 posts in 598 days


#1 posted 05-06-2015 08:17 PM

I use basic math. No need for geometry or trig for that.

I figure 2’ per person. Depends where it is going for how wide I want it.
One of the first things to consider is how many people do you want to be able to seat?
A quick trip to your local department store that sells tables is also another alternative that way you can measure and feel the different sizes.

-- -

View hotbyte's profile

hotbyte

844 posts in 2441 days


#2 posted 05-06-2015 08:18 PM

Take a tape measure to your favorite restaurant and measure away while waiting on your food :)

View pintodeluxe's profile

pintodeluxe

4859 posts in 2279 days


#3 posted 05-06-2015 08:23 PM

24” per chair is a good place to start, but I also look at table leg placement. This often means table legs are 48” or more apart. On extension tables, I’m okay if a guest has to straddle a table leg when the table is expanded. However, I don’t want daily users to have to straddle a leg.
If the table has solid leg assemblies (think mission tables with spindles), then an additional 12-18” overhang should be considered for seating on either end.

-- Willie, Washington "If You Choose Not To Decide, You Still Have Made a Choice" - Rush

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basuraman

25 posts in 2527 days


#4 posted 05-06-2015 09:01 PM


24” per chair is a good place to start, but I also look at table leg placement. This often means table legs are 48” or more apart. On extension tables, I m okay if a guest has to straddle a table leg when the table is expanded. However, I don t want daily users to have to straddle a leg.
If the table has solid leg assemblies (think mission tables with spindles), then an additional 12-18” overhang should be considered for seating on either end.

- pintodeluxe

Thank you. I am looking to build a new outdoor farm style table for 10 so it is looking like a 10 foot table.

View MNclone's profile

MNclone

187 posts in 1049 days


#5 posted 05-06-2015 11:16 PM


24” per chair is a good place to start, but I also look at table leg placement. This often means table legs are 48” or more apart. On extension tables, I m okay if a guest has to straddle a table leg when the table is expanded. However, I don t want daily users to have to straddle a leg.
If the table has solid leg assemblies (think mission tables with spindles), then an additional 12-18” overhang should be considered for seating on either end.

- pintodeluxe

Thank you. I am looking to build a new outdoor farm style table for 10 so it is looking like a 10 foot table.

- basuraman


If you have seating on the ends, 8’ will suffice.

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