LumberJocks

Voltage converter for NOVA 57080 DVR 2024

  • Advertise with us

« back to Woodturning forum

Forum topic by aaronacj posted 05-06-2015 02:08 AM 1063 views 0 times favorited 18 replies Add to Favorites Watch
View aaronacj's profile

aaronacj

18 posts in 668 days


05-06-2015 02:08 AM

I am currently in a rental and there are no 240v outlets in the garage and i am interested in buying the NOVA 57080 DVR 2024. Would i be able to use a converter safely to go from 120v to 240v?

All the converters seem to have max wattage, if it would work what wattage would i need?

http://www.amazon.com/Rockstone-Power-Voltage-Transformer-Converter/dp/B00CLYFNU0/ref=sr_1_11?s=electronics&ie=UTF8&qid=1430877488&sr=1-11&keywords=120v+to+220v+converter

Would this work?

I have been holding back because i was hoping to move but it will be stuck here for another year so looking at other options.

Aaron


18 replies so far

View MrUnix's profile (online now)

MrUnix

4247 posts in 1666 days


#1 posted 05-06-2015 02:25 AM

What is the amperage requirement for that thing? I checked the manual and it is more than useless in that regard, only saying that a surge protector capable of handling up to 15A is needed. Doesn’t even specify the voltage required… only that a ‘suitable’ power supply should be located near the machine. Maybe I missed it in my quick scan though. Based only on that limited info, 15A @240V is well past the capabilities of that converter you are looking at.

Do you have an electric clothes dryer in the garage or near it? Would be much cheaper to just make up an extension cord and use an existing 240v outlet.

Cheers,
Brad

-- Brad in FL - To be old and wise, you must first be young and stupid

View TopamaxSurvivor's profile

TopamaxSurvivor

17677 posts in 3143 days


#2 posted 05-06-2015 04:41 AM

You probably have a 15 amp 120 v outlet in the garage. You would only get 7.5 amps of 240 out of it.

-- Bob in WW ~ "some old things are lovely, warm still with life ... of the forgotten men who made them." - D.H. Lawrence

View Clouseau's profile

Clouseau

55 posts in 2500 days


#3 posted 05-06-2015 08:42 PM

How far away is your dryer outlet?
Dan Coleman

-- Dan Coleman, retired Welding Inspector and past IA Teacher

View aaronacj's profile

aaronacj

18 posts in 668 days


#4 posted 05-06-2015 09:00 PM

Its like 5-10 ft at most i just don’t want to run a cord through like that. I might just keep waiting… it’s not ment to be yet =).


How far away is your dryer outlet?
Dan Coleman

- Clouseau


View Kazooman's profile

Kazooman

628 posts in 1420 days


#5 posted 05-06-2015 10:20 PM

If it were me….....!

I would run a beefy enough cord over to my next door neighbor’s dryer outlet for power if necessary.

If you are serious enough about turning to invest in that lathe, then you should be willing to invest in a good cord to solve your current (pun intended) problem. So don’t run an extension cord. Rewire the lathe with 12 feet of proper sized cord, or whatever length it needs, and plug it in. Turn away. Keep the original cord in case it will work in the next location.

When I upgraded to a 220 volt table saw I was about to install another 220 breaker in the panel and an outlet in my basement shop. I realized that the electrical for my well was sitting right there. I am (unfortunately) hooked up to city water now and the original well is just used to water the lawn. With about twenty bucks worth of parts I put a switch on the well and a new outlet for my saw. If they were ever to run at the same time it might trip the breaker, but that will never happen. I assume that you can wait to dry your clothes while you are enjoying your incredible lathe!

BTW…. The new saw is a 3 Hp SawStop and I replaced the standard cord for a slightly longer version before I ever plugged it in. My shop configuration required about two more feet than the original cord to avoid having it suspended in mid-air between the saw and outlet. Why are the original cords on tools so short and why are they made from really inflexible materials?

View 489tad's profile

489tad

3102 posts in 2479 days


#6 posted 05-06-2015 11:22 PM

I did the dryer extension cord when I had to sell a bandsaw. It worked great.

-- Dan, Naperville IL, I.G.N.

View Clouseau's profile

Clouseau

55 posts in 2500 days


#7 posted 05-07-2015 02:05 AM

Years ago an old carpenter that did his share of remodeling in his life told me to invest in a small breaker box and install 2 220 volt breakers and 2 or 3 110 volt breakers with good cords and plugs appropriate for my tools. On the input side I installed a long dryer cord and cut off one side of the L shaped ground so it could also be plugged into a range outlet. That has been a good investment. Since I have twist-locks on all of my 220 v tools I have adapters made up for other input configurations also.
Dan Coleman

-- Dan Coleman, retired Welding Inspector and past IA Teacher

View Fred Hargis's profile

Fred Hargis

3950 posts in 1961 days


#8 posted 05-07-2015 05:10 PM

Aaron, to address the specific question..I’m not sure it would work. Here’s why (from a non-expert): the 240V required by the lathe is actually 2-120V legs, and they are (I think) 180ยบ out of phase. I think that transformer would give you 240V, but on one leg. That said, maybe one of the sparkies will be around with the real scoop, but until you know for sure I wouldn’t hook such a nice piece of equipment to that transformer. If you have access to a 240V dryer outlet, even with a long extension cord it would be a much better option. there is a very good chance I’m competely wrong about that transformer, so take this for what it’s worth.

-- Our village hasn't lost it's idiot, he was elected to congress.

View DBordello's profile

DBordello

132 posts in 694 days


#9 posted 05-07-2015 05:50 PM

I would say to take the time to install a 240V circuit.

View TopamaxSurvivor's profile

TopamaxSurvivor

17677 posts in 3143 days


#10 posted 05-07-2015 06:39 PM



I think that transformer would give you 240V, but on one leg. That said, maybe one of the sparkies will be around with the real scoop,
- Fred Hargis

It will make 240 volts. The problem will probably be the capacity of the 120 volt circuit that feeds it. If the lathe isn’t convertible to 120, this transformer won’t fix it without 30 or 40 amp 120 v circuit. If the lathe is convertible to 120 v, that would be the best option. Disclaimer: At least that is the way electricity worked before I retired ;-)

-- Bob in WW ~ "some old things are lovely, warm still with life ... of the forgotten men who made them." - D.H. Lawrence

View Richard's profile

Richard

1907 posts in 2158 days


#11 posted 05-07-2015 07:19 PM

I am also in a rental and I use a 25ft 12G cord to connect to the unused 220 dryer outlet (we have a gas dryer that only needs 120) and run my 2hp Rockwell table saw on it and have had no issues at all. My outlet is an older 30amp with two hot’s and a ground unlike the newer circuits that have 2 hot’s a neutral and a ground.

View MrUnix's profile (online now)

MrUnix

4247 posts in 1666 days


#12 posted 05-07-2015 07:27 PM


If the lathe isn t convertible to 120, this transformer won t fix it without 30 or 40 amp 120 v circuit. If the lathe is convertible to 120 v, that would be the best option.
- TopamaxSurvivor

From what I’ve read, it’s not… it has a 2.3 HP motor that runs on 240v (220/230/240.. take your pick). It is a computer controlled variable speed thing and they call it an “Intelligent Switched Reluctance Motor” :) If running an extension to the dryer outlet isn’t an option, then about the only other option to get some chips flying ‘right now’ would be to find a lathe that runs on 120v… which could then be sold later on when 240v is available. Since it’s a rental property, the choices are rather limited, and as Aaron says, it’s probably not meant to be yet.

Cheers,
Brad

-- Brad in FL - To be old and wise, you must first be young and stupid

View TopamaxSurvivor's profile

TopamaxSurvivor

17677 posts in 3143 days


#13 posted 05-07-2015 07:45 PM

That motor should draw about 24 amp on 120 v. Way too much for a normal 120 v outlet circuit.

-- Bob in WW ~ "some old things are lovely, warm still with life ... of the forgotten men who made them." - D.H. Lawrence

View Rick M's profile (online now)

Rick M

7935 posts in 1847 days


#14 posted 05-07-2015 09:50 PM



It is a computer controlled variable speed thing and they call it an “Intelligent Switched Reluctance Motor” :)
Cheers,
Brad

- MrUnix

Is that the same as those new dryer motors that are rated at like 30,000 RPM? Seems like they are replacing induction and DC motors. The downside is you need a computer chip to control the speed or they will just keep speeding up until they explode (possibly).

-- http://thewoodknack.blogspot.com/

View aaronacj's profile

aaronacj

18 posts in 668 days


#15 posted 05-08-2015 02:00 AM

I have a lathe, my business has picked up a bunch so I was looking at upgrading. There is a dryer plug next to the garage door about 10 feet away from where i put my lathe so i am thing about that option. I can not install a 240 plug because it is a rental (Military housing).

I decided to purchase a few other things till i figure out this 240v situation. Once again thanks for the replies.

showing 1 through 15 of 18 replies

Have your say...

You must be signed in to reply.

DISCLAIMER: Any posts on LJ are posted by individuals acting in their own right and do not necessarily reflect the views of LJ. LJ will not be held liable for the actions of any user.

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

HomeRefurbers.com