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Saw for cutting logs lengthwise?

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Forum topic by BreathMint76 posted 05-05-2015 09:07 PM 4118 views 1 time favorited 49 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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BreathMint76

1 post in 577 days


05-05-2015 09:07 PM

Topic tags/keywords: saw question rip

I am planning to do a project that would require me to cut a log (About 6 in. in diameter and 3 feet long), but for several varying reasons I would rather not purchase a piece of machinery to do this. I was wondering what the best hand saw would be to do this with.


49 replies so far

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firefighterontheside

13439 posts in 1316 days


#1 posted 05-05-2015 09:50 PM

A chain saw.

-- Bill M. "People change, walnut doesn't" by Gene.

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DocBailey

584 posts in 1819 days


#2 posted 05-05-2015 10:05 PM

^not helpful and not even funny

Your title seems to indicate that you want to rip the log—you’ll need either a coarse-toothed 4 – 5½ PPI rip handsaw or better still, a docking saw

OR

a frame saw.

The frame saw will, of course, need sufficent clearance between blade and brace bar so as to allow the log to pass through it as the cut progresses.

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firefighterontheside

13439 posts in 1316 days


#3 posted 05-05-2015 11:05 PM

Wasnt trying to be funny. Many people have chainsaws. If he just needs to get the log in half and has one it will certainly do the job.

-- Bill M. "People change, walnut doesn't" by Gene.

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trz

90 posts in 1946 days


#4 posted 05-06-2015 01:27 AM

Chainsaw would be my first choice

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upchuck

540 posts in 1125 days


#5 posted 05-06-2015 02:12 AM

My choice of tools would be what I have on hand: Sledge Hammer or Maul with wedges. If the wood was not too stringy and if it had even grain that was not interlocking it is possible to get a clean split. There would be more cleanup of the split surfaces then a sawn face but those are the tools I have on hand. With some woods this idea wouldn’t work.

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TheWoodenOyster

1275 posts in 1394 days


#6 posted 05-06-2015 03:25 AM

Here is a frame saw specifically made for resawing. This type of frame is made to saw thru and basically have infinite clearance depthwise. You just couldn’t go with a massive diameter log.

-- The Wood Is Your Oyster

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OldEd

39 posts in 1071 days


#7 posted 05-06-2015 04:32 AM

I’d go with the chain saw… JUST AS LONG as you have a ripping chain on it. The normal chainsaw chain is a CROSS-CUT chain, after all. That’s what you are doing with it, isn’t it? Cross-cutting the trunk of the tree to fell it, or cut the limbs off, or sectioning it for whatever purpose, ranging from firewood or what ever…

I just googled “Chainsaw ripping chain” and got pointers to Oregon, which makes a “95R” ripping chain, which is just the thing for you, especially if you want to make planks out of the log…

Of course, you fell the tree with a cross-cut chain, and then switch.

-- OldEd

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Ghidrah

667 posts in 682 days


#8 posted 05-06-2015 03:31 PM

Chain saw would chew up a lot of useable product, I’m a sissy when it comes to the amount of labor involved with doing it by hand. I’d begin looking for someone close by that had a BS and some Pam.

-- I meant to do that!

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JohnChung

372 posts in 1534 days


#9 posted 05-06-2015 04:31 PM

I would suggest a wedge and hammer. It can split the wood in the middle.

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Wildwood

1881 posts in 1594 days


#10 posted 05-06-2015 07:45 PM

Some species of wood with straight grain split lot easier than others. Knots concealed make splitting a log evenly more difficult by hand. When splitting logs over two feet long axes, mails, and wedges just too much work.

A homemade saw buck and one or two man rip cut saw would do the job.

Rip saw –a saw with rip teeth meant for cutting a board along its length (with the grain).

Crosscut saw a handsaw used to cut a board through its width (across the grain).

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=l7zzqWMUq6I

Cost of a new or used rip saw today verus an electric chain saw?

I would be using homemade saw buck and electric chain saw faster and safe too!

-- Bill

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runswithscissors

2176 posts in 1485 days


#11 posted 05-07-2015 07:34 AM

If it’s just a single cut, I wouldn’t bother with a ripping chain. They don’t rip that much better than a cross cutting chain, which will do just fine. But experiment with different angles of the saw to the log until you find the most efficient orientation.

-- I admit to being an adrenaline junky; fortunately, I'm very easily frightened

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jar944

88 posts in 897 days


#12 posted 05-07-2015 12:50 PM

chainsaw.

noodle it (cut with the grain or as close to with the grain as possible) a std chain will be fine.

Edit didn’t realize this was in the hand tool forum.

View mahdee's profile

mahdee

3547 posts in 1227 days


#13 posted 05-07-2015 02:45 PM

If you have a fro, that might do the job the easiest way and least time consuming provided the piece is straight grain. Wedges work well too. A drawknife can clean the split followed by hand plane.

-- earthartandfoods.com

View SirIrb's profile

SirIrb

1239 posts in 690 days


#14 posted 05-07-2015 02:56 PM

Chain saw
Chalk line
Bourbon

Ok, Bourbon for when you conquer it.

But you have to trash-talk the log first.
“Im about to rip you to shreds. You hear me, log? The rest of the forest will cry in fear when I get done with you. [swig of bourbon] You just got yourself too deep. Fear me, log, Im about to go loco on you.”

-- Don't blame me, I voted for no one.

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ChuckV

2880 posts in 2987 days


#15 posted 05-07-2015 03:21 PM

Do you have a really good friend to help?

-- “Big man, pig man, ha ha, charade you are.” ― R. Waters

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