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Forum topic by missesalot posted 05-05-2015 05:48 PM 1088 views 0 times favorited 17 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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missesalot

102 posts in 1062 days


05-05-2015 05:48 PM

I’m building a kitchen island top from walnut that’s been planed down to 7/8”, planning to use 5” wide planks glued up oversize and then using rip and cross cut offs to build up the edges. Planning to add a piece of 3/4” plywood to top of cabinets to serve as a core and make the entire top thicker, provide support. Planning to screw the walnut top to the plywood with slotted holes and washers to allow for movement, my question is how many screws should I use for this? The top will be 3×5. I don’t know whether to use one screw in each corner or one every 6 inches. Anyone with experience with this?


17 replies so far

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missesalot

102 posts in 1062 days


#1 posted 05-06-2015 01:26 AM

Any buddy?

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hotbyte

842 posts in 2439 days


#2 posted 05-06-2015 01:36 AM

I recently did a table with the rips and cross cuts attached underside to add thicker look. It turned out well.

As for the plywood, how large a distance would the top be spanning? Unless an extremely long distance (or you plan on it doubling as a dance floor), the plywood might be overkill for a 7/8” thick top.

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missesalot

102 posts in 1062 days


#3 posted 05-06-2015 01:04 PM

the top will be 36×60 and sitting on top of a 24×48 cabinet, so a one foot overhang on one end and one side. thanks for responding hotbyte

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BinghamtonEd

2281 posts in 1833 days


#4 posted 05-06-2015 01:21 PM

Not exactly the same as what you’re doing, but I built my island with a maple butcher-block top just under 2” thick. The cabinet construction was 3/4” ply, and I ran 3 strips of 3/4” ply across the top of the cabinet, to allow me to screw up into the top (in addition to silicone caulk). The cabinet was 24” deep and about 40” long, the top overhangs by about 2” in the front and sides, and I put 3 screws (one on each end, one in the middle) in each strip, for a total of 9 screws. So, they were probably around 10” apart. No problems after probably 2 years.

-- - The mightiest oak in the forest is just a little nut that held its ground.

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missesalot

102 posts in 1062 days


#5 posted 05-06-2015 01:41 PM

can you explain where/how you used the silicone caulk? i’m a rookie, as you can tell i’m sure:-)

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dhazelton

2324 posts in 1760 days


#6 posted 05-06-2015 01:51 PM

I would just use blobs of silicone as if you were installing a bathroom vanity top. Flexible and will hold well.

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BinghamtonEd

2281 posts in 1833 days


#7 posted 05-06-2015 01:55 PM



I would just use blobs of silicone as if you were installing a bathroom vanity top. Flexible and will hold well.

- dhazelton

This. I ran a bead around the perimeter of the top of the cabinet. The screws up into the top were to encourage it to stay flat in the long run. This island is on wheels and gets moved around a lot, so I also figured more support is better.

-- - The mightiest oak in the forest is just a little nut that held its ground.

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missesalot

102 posts in 1062 days


#8 posted 05-06-2015 01:55 PM

so use blobs of silicone instead of screws?

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BinghamtonEd

2281 posts in 1833 days


#9 posted 05-06-2015 02:05 PM

If you’re looking to make the top thicker, I think either would work, but I would probably opt for screws to make sure the plywood gets pulled tight to the walnut and your top doesn’t end up off-level. For installing the finished top to the cabinet, a bead of silicone will work.

-- - The mightiest oak in the forest is just a little nut that held its ground.

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dhazelton

2324 posts in 1760 days


#10 posted 05-09-2015 12:15 AM

I’d keep the screws to the center of the top and silicone to the perimeter.

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missesalot

102 posts in 1062 days


#11 posted 05-12-2015 02:36 PM

An update and a few questions. I decided to do a smaller 15×71” glue up with the walnut to test my method and so far its gone ok.
had a small problem with the miters which i’ve had to fill with dust/glue and that seems like its going to be just fine.

On the ends, i can definitely see more glue line than i wanted to, i’m using TBIII so its better than it could have been being a little darker but i’m looking for a way to deal with it. It seems to be a problem caused from the boards being very slightly different thicknesses coming out of the planer. Not sure what to do about that in the future, i was thinking of glueing up the next panel in manageable pieces and putting them through the planer to minimize the issue, but it still seems like an imperfect system.

I used pocket holes to align the boards, won’t do that again, bought a biscuit joiner to help with alignment for next one.
would love to have any and all feedback.

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pintodeluxe

4855 posts in 2277 days


#12 posted 05-12-2015 03:25 PM

Interested in your comment about the boards being slightly different thickness coming off the planer. The picture looks good, and I can’t actually see any gaps. Did you joint the boards before planing them, or just used the planer only?

Good stuff.

-- Willie, Washington "If You Choose Not To Decide, You Still Have Made a Choice" - Rush

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missesalot

102 posts in 1062 days


#13 posted 05-12-2015 03:42 PM

i did joint them. its the glue lines on the built up ends that i’m not nuts about, i literally wanted them to disappear. I”m completely aware that my expectations could be out of line as well.

my comment about the boards thickness was about the fact that even though i planed them down to the same setting on the planer, there still seemed to be some very small differences, and when cutting off the ends to flip under for the build up it essentially doubles whatever those differences are in created the bookmatched look. I’m operating under the assumption that that is the origin of the visible glue lines. i welcome all to beat me up on any and all of this as i really want to kick this projects ass.

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hotbyte

842 posts in 2439 days


#14 posted 05-12-2015 05:30 PM

Another method I’ve read about but not tried is to make an initial square cut on the end, then make another several inches back and slip that cut-off under the top to make a “slip match” instead of “book match” look. If you do any prototyping, it would be interesting to see the different looks.

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missesalot

102 posts in 1062 days


#15 posted 05-12-2015 07:43 PM

i would love to see what this method looks like. just to check my thinking on this, is the intent to make it look like its actually one piece of thicker wood or to create a cool effect by being obvious about using multiple pieces?

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