LumberJocks

Looking for a decent open type drum sander.

  • Advertise with us

« back to Power Tools, Hardware and Accessories forum

Forum topic by mahdee posted 05-05-2015 03:34 PM 919 views 1 time favorited 21 replies Add to Favorites Watch
View mahdee's profile

mahdee

3554 posts in 1234 days


05-05-2015 03:34 PM

Topic tags/keywords: question sander

After spending $700 on a piece a garbage from Steel City on a planer, I am weary of jumping in on a drum sander of same caliber. I looked at the JET 629004K 16-32 Plus 16-Inch 1-1/2-Horsepower Open Stand Drum Sander, 110-Volt 1 Phase
And read all 114 reviews and got a feeling this product is not nearly as good as advertised; expensive abrasive, hard to roll the abrasive on, needs various adjustments that are difficult to do and so on. Apparently, the price has also jumped 30% as well.
Any suggestion on a brand that you have owned for a while and are satisfied with its function and price of accessories?

-- earthartandfoods.com


21 replies so far

View Ripthorn's profile

Ripthorn

1406 posts in 2452 days


#1 posted 05-05-2015 03:56 PM

I want a drum sander, but after seeing all the successful home builds, that is the way I want to go. Of course, I just need to do it now…

-- Brian T. - Exact science is not an exact science

View mahdee's profile

mahdee

3554 posts in 1234 days


#2 posted 05-05-2015 04:01 PM

I am willing to make one if it is within my capability and the material cost less than buying one at store. Will check into it. Thanks

-- earthartandfoods.com

View BroncoBrian's profile

BroncoBrian

435 posts in 1425 days


#3 posted 05-05-2015 04:04 PM

Howdy James Bond (yes, that is what I take from your username)

I want that Jet as well. I used it at Woodcraft and it is great. The complaints are not about build quality or value, thy are more about the user. To use the sander, the owner of the store walked me through changing the wrap, it was simple. His method was easy, quick, and it took one wrap to get it right. I know you have to watch for moisture, pressure and some other factors that can ruin a wrap quickly. But if you are know what you are doing, the abrasive should last and you should not have any issues.

I too am over cheap tools. They are great on paper, but that is about it. This Jet is the real deal. Next tool for my shop, probably in the next 2-3 months. Jet should have a sale in June for 15%, that would be a great time to pick it up.

The alternative is a great ROS with dust collection like the Festool. That is why I have not jumped on the 1632, the festool is so good, I don’t need it like I though I would.

-- Bigfoot tries to take pictures of me

View gfadvm's profile

gfadvm

14940 posts in 2157 days


#4 posted 05-06-2015 12:39 AM

mrjinx007, I found an older Craftsman 18/36 drum sander that is a trouble free workhorse! I had previously purchased a NEW Jet 10/20 that was a complete loser (there’s $700 down the toilet). Don’t know if Craftsman still makes the unit I have but I doubt it would be the same tool.

There is a 26” Woodmaster that looks new on Tulsa CL for $2000 (probably a good deal). 5 HP single phase motor.

-- " I'll try to be nicer, if you'll try to be smarter" gfadvm

View mahdee's profile

mahdee

3554 posts in 1234 days


#5 posted 05-06-2015 10:25 AM

gfadvm, Checked out Sears site and as you said, they don’t sell them anymore. Craftsman brand are not what they used to be for sure. That woodmaster is beautiful and 5 horse sure makes it worth the price. I’ll see if I can talk him down to $1500. Thanks

-- earthartandfoods.com

View mahdee's profile

mahdee

3554 posts in 1234 days


#6 posted 05-06-2015 10:28 AM

BroncoBrian, I have a ROS you can have for $100.

-- earthartandfoods.com

View BroncoBrian's profile

BroncoBrian

435 posts in 1425 days


#7 posted 05-06-2015 01:55 PM



BroncoBrian, I have a ROS you can have for $100.

- mrjinx007

Which one?

-- Bigfoot tries to take pictures of me

View mahdee's profile

mahdee

3554 posts in 1234 days


#8 posted 05-06-2015 01:59 PM

BroncoBrian,
I am sorry, I thought you meant RAS. Radial Arm Saw.

-- earthartandfoods.com

View BroncoBrian's profile

BroncoBrian

435 posts in 1425 days


#9 posted 05-06-2015 02:02 PM

Ha, that would makes much less sense on my post. A good ROS can replace a drum sander, not so for a RAS.

-- Bigfoot tries to take pictures of me

View gfadvm's profile

gfadvm

14940 posts in 2157 days


#10 posted 05-06-2015 02:20 PM

I have that same motor on my Woodmaster 18” planer and it is a beast. And Woodmaster stuff is made in USA in Kansas City. There are good to deal with.

-- " I'll try to be nicer, if you'll try to be smarter" gfadvm

View AZWoody's profile

AZWoody

697 posts in 691 days


#11 posted 05-06-2015 02:35 PM

I have read good reviews of Supermax.

I think the equivalent size might be a little bit more expensive but from what I’ve read, and after talking to the people at Supermax and Acme tools, thei dealer they recommend, I am going to be getting one very soon.

Adjustments are supposed to be very simple on their open ended sanders.

View mahdee's profile

mahdee

3554 posts in 1234 days


#12 posted 05-06-2015 02:44 PM

I have checked into Supermax and it looks simple enough. The abrasive seem reasonable. I like the one with the brush and another drum. But the drums are $1000 each.

-- earthartandfoods.com

View Woodbum's profile

Woodbum

732 posts in 2532 days


#13 posted 05-06-2015 02:47 PM

I have the Performax 16-32 sander; pre Jet acquisition model. I have not had any belt tensioning issues like some have reported. I buy rolls of sandpaper from Peachtree Woodworking and cut them to length myself; no expensive precut paper for me. The motor side paper attachment on the drum is a little cumbersome, but I have gotton used to it, and don’t even think about it anymore. This is one of the most used tools in my shop. But you need to remember to take small bites or the motor will bog down and pop the overload or the breaker or both. Oily woods have a tendency to burn if you try to take too big of a bite too; screwing the belt up with residue. If I had it to do over again, I would buy it again or the next larger model. All in all, I like the sander and would hate to be without it. Sorry about your experience with the planer, it sucks to throw out that much money for something that you are not happy with.

-- "Now I'm just another old guy wearing funny clothes"

View mahdee's profile

mahdee

3554 posts in 1234 days


#14 posted 05-06-2015 02:49 PM

Check this out. Big discount.

-- earthartandfoods.com

View splintergroup's profile

splintergroup

829 posts in 689 days


#15 posted 05-06-2015 03:23 PM

I’m with Woodbum. I also have the Performax 16-32 which is the origin of the Jet model.
Changing belts is a non issue after gaining a little experience. Belts are about $4 each when you buy in roll quantity from places like Klingspore and cut the tapered ends yourself. Warnings about loading/burning belts are real, however with light passes (never more than 1/4 turn with 120 or coarser grit and 1/8 turn with 120+) you can sand most anything. You can restore a gummed up belt with a soak in ammonia and you should use a belt cleaner bar regularly. I found that for my needs, anything finer than 220 (on rare occasions) is a waste. I usually drum sand to 180 to get things perfectly flat and then proceed with my ROS or hand sanding to finish up.

I made my own extension tables, the factory units are over priced and you really need the extra table space if you work with longer (>24”) stock. You cannot expect the sander to remove any warp or twist from lumber, for this you need to use the same techniques you would use for a planer (shims on a carrier board, etc.).

My biggest complaint is the snipe that occurs at the forward end of the stock. After much dinking around, I’ve eliminated 95% of it with proper technique and adjustment of the outfeed pressure roller.

Look at the drum sanders people here have made. Some amazing bits of work with significant savings over the cost of a factory model (which generally seem over priced for what they are). The one thing I see lacking in the home made sanders is the power feed. As with Woodbum, this is one of the most used big tools in my shop (really only second to the table saw). A power feed makes it simple and fast.

The drum sander is not for everyone, you need serious dust collection and they are pricey, but I now find it indispensable for my work. They are finicky beasts for sure, but after having one for the past decade, I won’t give it up.

showing 1 through 15 of 21 replies

Have your say...

You must be signed in to reply.

DISCLAIMER: Any posts on LJ are posted by individuals acting in their own right and do not necessarily reflect the views of LJ. LJ will not be held liable for the actions of any user.

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

HomeRefurbers.com