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Forum topic by woodbrain posted 05-04-2015 02:45 AM 872 views 0 times favorited 10 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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woodbrain

21 posts in 593 days


05-04-2015 02:45 AM

I have quite a few woodworking tools that I’ve been collecting for a time when I can focus on wood projects. I’m finaly there.

I’m in the process of building a shop 40×60 which will include a wood shop area, possibly 40×20 or some other size, that will all work itself out in the future.

I’m looking forward to building the shop inside, along storage and whatever else I will do to get the shop up and running.

My question, is this: With some skills and not much time building anything other than a few storage bins, and utilizing my tools to build things for the yard etc. I haven’t really build anything that has made me confident in building cabinets, furniture, or anything of any quality.

Does anybody have a recommendation for a progressiv way to enhance my skills? Please help me with this quesiton only for now.

Thank you.

Allen


10 replies so far

View SuperCubber's profile

SuperCubber

863 posts in 1744 days


#1 posted 05-04-2015 03:24 AM

I think you’ll find that as you start getting your shop set up, you’ll want to build “furniture” for your tools and such. That seems to be a common method for refining skills. It’s how I’ve done it (and continue to do). Some examples would be a workbench, drill charging station, drawers for tools/organization, etc.

Additionally, if you wait until your skills are perfect before building any real projects, you’ll never build any real projects! :)

Hope that helps.

-- Joe | Spartanburg, SC | "To give anything less than your best is to sacrafice the gift." - Steve Prefontaine

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crank49

3980 posts in 2430 days


#2 posted 05-04-2015 09:33 AM

There are many great books out there.
Get some and start reading.
The main thing that sets a wood worker apart from a DIYer is joinery.
You have to understand why certain types of joinery are used and where they make sense.
You must learn about wood, how it moves, how it changes, where its strengths are and are not.
As already said, most wood workers start by building things for their own shop.
Some jigs and boxes, then on to shelves, tables and cabinets.
Maybe, a stool or chair.
Through out the process you will learn that nothing is perfect.
You can make plans or buy plans, but the degree of skill you develope is how you adapt to changes, fix mistakes.
Good luck, have fun, and be careful.

-- Michael: Hillary has a long list of accomplishments, though most DAs would refer to them as felonies.

View rwe2156's profile

rwe2156

2187 posts in 940 days


#3 posted 05-04-2015 10:38 AM

To me, its 2 things: watching (learning) and doing.

I found that watching videos of the “masters” like Frank Klauzs was a big big help to me.
Plus I watched all the FWW videos and other people like Paul Sellers.

I think taking a class is a good idea, but I haven’t done that.

The practice part is where its really at and the idea that your shop furniture is your testing ground it right.

The other big aspect is IMO you’ve got to have decent tools, so get the best you can.

-- Everything is a prototype thats why its one of a kind!!

View gfadvm's profile

gfadvm

14940 posts in 2149 days


#4 posted 05-05-2015 12:05 AM

Joe’s method above was my approach. The drawers in my shop have many different joinery techniques. Raised panels were learned while building drill bit storage drawers. Just practice and experiment on your shop “furniture” until you are comfortable with various techniques. Then on to finishing…........I have some French Polished drawer fronts where I store small jigs.

-- " I'll try to be nicer, if you'll try to be smarter" gfadvm

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DIYaholic

19169 posts in 2134 days


#5 posted 05-05-2015 01:26 AM

Yup….
Shop furniture, fixtures and jigs….
WW Mags, WW Books & YouTube (CAUTION: There are videos with bad & dangerous examples out there!)....
WW Classes, WW Clubs….
Are all ways to gain knowledge, as you improve & further your skill set.
Throughout the process, make “small” projects for gifts….

Most important…. have fun and enjoy the journey!!!

-- Randy-- I may not be good...but I am slow! If good things come to those who wait.... Why is procrastination a bad thing?

View Don Broussard's profile

Don Broussard

3019 posts in 1711 days


#6 posted 05-05-2015 01:29 AM

Good advice so far. I started with shop furniture to practice some joinery skills. When I built my workbench, I blew out the workbench top when I did the through mortises for the legs. I’ve only done that ONCE. There are some things that you can only learn by doing.

-- People say I hammer like lightning. It's not that I'm fast -- it's that I never hit the same place twice!

View EEngineer's profile

EEngineer

1059 posts in 3073 days


#7 posted 05-05-2015 02:13 AM

I think you’ll find that as you start getting your shop set up, you’ll want to build “furniture” for your tools and such. That seems to be a common method for refining skills.

+1

Of course, that may become a full-time endeavor :) I still enjoy making things for the shop as much or more than “real” projects.

-- "Find out what you cannot do and then go do it!"

View Richard H's profile

Richard H

489 posts in 1140 days


#8 posted 05-05-2015 02:30 AM

I guess I started a bit different. I bought my first couple woodworking tools to build some tables right from New Yankee Workshop than built up my collection over time by building more and more projects for around the house. My first shop project wasn’t until I build several things for around the house and found I needed a workbench (also from NYW). Later I built a router table and some shop cabinets but the bulk of my skill building projects have come from pushing myself more building things for outside the shop.

Of course back than the Internet while around wasn’t anywhere near the form it is today. New Yankee Workshop and a few magazines/books where the best source of ideas both for projects and techniques.

Push yourself to try new things. You will never cut dovetails either by machine or hand unless you push yourself to try. Don’t let yourself get to comfortable with your current methods of work and always be looking for places where you can try new things.

View woodbrain's profile

woodbrain

21 posts in 593 days


#9 posted 05-05-2015 05:05 PM

Where can I find a good set of plans, or an idea about building a table to fit with my unisaw. That sounds like a good place to start.

View Richard H's profile

Richard H

489 posts in 1140 days


#10 posted 05-05-2015 05:12 PM



Where can I find a good set of plans, or an idea about building a table to fit with my unisaw. That sounds like a good place to start.

- woodbrain

At the top of this screen search for the keywords “outfeed table”.

The Wood Whisper also has a video of one he build. http://www.thewoodwhisperer.com/videos/my-new-outfeed-table/?as=outfeed&mode=posts&ap=1

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