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Need help identifying species of this slab

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Forum topic by GravyBones posted 05-04-2015 12:44 AM 1230 views 0 times favorited 16 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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GravyBones

43 posts in 597 days


05-04-2015 12:44 AM

Topic tags/keywords: wood slab identify coffee table

Hey all, I have a really neat slab of wood that is 5 feet by 2 feet and is 7/4

I sanded just a bit and rubbed some 100% Chinese tung oil in it to see the grain. You can tell the spot from the pics where it is darker. I would like to know what species of wood you think it is.

Any help is much appreciated. Also how would you describe this particular slab as to what part of a tree it came from, e.g., a hip where a branch started to shoot out. It is going to be a really nice coffee table once I figure out how and what to make the legs out of. There is a crack in the center that I think you can see in the pics. I am not sure there is any call to do anything about it though. Maybe just leave it.

I will likely not use any non-organic product on this piece to finish it, most likely just tung oil. I don’t particularly like the typical polyurethane coating all over the wood that I see a lot of.

Any help will be appreciated, thanks.

-- http://www.WaveFish.com


16 replies so far

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ric53

147 posts in 984 days


#1 posted 05-04-2015 05:42 PM

It looks like some sort of walnut. It would help what part of the states it came from

-- Ric, Mazomanie

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chrisstef

15671 posts in 2471 days


#2 posted 05-04-2015 05:44 PM

Leaning towards walnut here as well.

-- rock, chalk, jayhawk

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Kazooman

628 posts in 1417 days


#3 posted 05-04-2015 07:09 PM

I agree some type of walnut. You can see the grain by sanding a bit and wiping with mineral spirits. The solvent will evaporate completely. I wouldn’t wipe an area down with tung oil like that even if that was going to be the final finish. The oil can penetrate pores in the wood and cure (like it is meant to). Then when you go to sand the entire piece that area might act differently leaving a blotch. Hopefully you won’t have any problems with that very nice piece of wood.

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GravyBones

43 posts in 597 days


#4 posted 05-04-2015 07:13 PM

I got it in southwest Ohio. Also the part with tung oil is the bottom, out of view. Also there will be no toxins on this like mineral spirits. Thnx for help so far. This will likely take several weeks of tung oil rubs to get it just right. Then the curing phase.

-- http://www.WaveFish.com

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WDHLT15

1572 posts in 1941 days


#5 posted 05-04-2015 08:42 PM

It is pecan.

Pecan is a hickory, and hickory is in the walnut family. You will find it very hard.

-- Danny Located in Perry, GA. Forester. Wood-Mizer LT40HD35 Sawmill. Nyle L53 Dehumidification Kiln. hamsleyhardwood.com

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Yonak

979 posts in 986 days


#6 posted 05-05-2015 03:20 AM



It is pecan.

- WDHLT15

Danny, it doesn’t look like any pecan I’ve seen. How can you tell ?

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GravyBones

43 posts in 597 days


#7 posted 05-05-2015 04:01 AM

It is 5 feet long by 2 feet wide and is 7/4. I paid $20 for it at a garage sale. Do you think it is worth it?

I noticed where the tung oil is that the grain has depth to it and changes reflection when you move around and look at it. It acts like mahogany does..it isn’t mahogany, I’m just saying the depth of parts of the grain act like mahogany when you look at certain parts. The reflections change like you can look deep into it.

Great replies so far.

-- http://www.WaveFish.com

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WDHLT15

1572 posts in 1941 days


#8 posted 05-05-2015 11:46 AM

Yonak,

Mainly from the color and texture of the heartwood. Pecan heartwood from old trees has a very brown color, sometimes lighter, sometimes much darker. Here are a couple of pieces with the color.

-- Danny Located in Perry, GA. Forester. Wood-Mizer LT40HD35 Sawmill. Nyle L53 Dehumidification Kiln. hamsleyhardwood.com

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MSRiverdog

82 posts in 3201 days


#9 posted 08-22-2015 01:52 AM

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WDHLT15

1572 posts in 1941 days


#10 posted 08-22-2015 02:06 AM

No Sir. Sorry. It is pecan. Although pecan is in the walnut family.

-- Danny Located in Perry, GA. Forester. Wood-Mizer LT40HD35 Sawmill. Nyle L53 Dehumidification Kiln. hamsleyhardwood.com

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Yonak

979 posts in 986 days


#11 posted 08-22-2015 04:28 AM

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mahdee

3553 posts in 1232 days


#12 posted 08-22-2015 02:11 PM

Yep. Pecan.

-- earthartandfoods.com

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Rick M

7922 posts in 1845 days


#13 posted 08-23-2015 05:53 AM

I can’t say it isn’t pecan, I’ve never seen pecan in person but it doesn’t look anything like pictures of pecan. It does look like walnut sapwood where they’ve slabbed it off the outside of the tree.

-- http://thewoodknack.blogspot.com/

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BurlyBob

3688 posts in 1730 days


#14 posted 08-23-2015 06:01 AM

Yeah, whatever! You got one beautiful piece. I am so very jealous.

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WDHLT15

1572 posts in 1941 days


#15 posted 08-24-2015 04:17 PM

Thought that I would post this pic of some very nice heart pecan. This one screams to be a little hall table.

I recent sawed some really nice older pecan with a good bit of heartwood. These boards are 9/4 (sawn at 2 3/8” rough). They should plane out to a full 2” once dry.

-- Danny Located in Perry, GA. Forester. Wood-Mizer LT40HD35 Sawmill. Nyle L53 Dehumidification Kiln. hamsleyhardwood.com

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