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Inexpensive kiln dried lbr?

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Forum topic by JerryLH posted 05-03-2015 10:52 PM 821 views 0 times favorited 9 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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JerryLH

104 posts in 778 days


05-03-2015 10:52 PM

Topic tags/keywords: cheap lumber secondary lumber

There may be no such thing as ‘inexpensive kiln dried lbr’—but I still need to ask the question. Since the project I’m thinking of would have all the components – but the top – completely covered by a hard surface veneer – the lbr need not be pretty – just stable. (I’m not sure at this point what the veneer will be—it won’t be a wooden veneer). Thanks for your help!

-- Develop your character -- for it becomes your destiny. Jerry - Mannford, Ok


9 replies so far

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bonesbr549

1176 posts in 2533 days


#1 posted 05-03-2015 11:19 PM

If veneer then solid wood not advised. It will expand and contract at a rate diff from the veneer and split and crack. For ansuvbstrait to veneer plywood is good or Mdf. What is the project details Really can’t give a blanket statement. Is it to be painted or a finish with a stain or dye?

-- Sooner or later Liberals run out of other people's money.

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AlaskaGuy

2406 posts in 1776 days


#2 posted 05-04-2015 12:27 AM

I don’t understand. What exactly is “a hard surface veneer”?

-- Alaskan's for Global warming!

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JerryLH

104 posts in 778 days


#3 posted 05-04-2015 03:04 AM

I don’t understand. What exactly is “a hard surface veneer”?

I don’t blame you for not understanding – I wasn’t sure what to call it. I believe I mentioned that the veneer, ‘won’t be wood’. In my mind – a hard surface veneer – would cover things like formica, plastic sheeting or some sort of metal sheeting. I used copper roofing sheeting to cover our kitchen cabinet countertops and backsplash. In the pic you can see the countertops. I’m thinking on how I can combine
wood and metal more in furniture.

-- Develop your character -- for it becomes your destiny. Jerry - Mannford, Ok

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AlaskaGuy

2406 posts in 1776 days


#4 posted 05-04-2015 05:19 AM

An important piece of information is missing in your post. What’s the project??

-- Alaskan's for Global warming!

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Moron

5032 posts in 3360 days


#5 posted 05-04-2015 05:37 AM

generally speaking

kd timber

is not only expensive

but will remain a measure of time : )

-- "Good artists borrow, great artists steal”…..Picasso

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JerryLH

104 posts in 778 days


#6 posted 05-04-2015 02:47 PM

An important piece of information is missing in your post. What’s the project??

I don’t mean to be intentionally vague but ’the’ project has not been determined. I mentioned in my initial question it could be ’all’ the components of a table but the table top itself. So, what say yee – I would appreciate any and all feedback.

-- Develop your character -- for it becomes your destiny. Jerry - Mannford, Ok

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bonesbr549

1176 posts in 2533 days


#7 posted 05-04-2015 03:03 PM

Ok, if you are going to cover it, what about the inside? Are you going to have a nice insiide face? The reason I ask is, if it’s just like an island type deal, then use construction grade pine. It’s cheap and will support the other material just fine. If it’s formica or something that will be glued down, the mdf works great for adheasion with contact cement.

If the inside is to be seen like in base cabinets, then I’d go prefinished ply. If you must and I mean must have HW, then poplar is stable and will be reasonable in cost still. Great paint grade, and can be finished with dye if you know what you are doing.

Again, if you are building a shell I’d not sink HW under it. But that’s me.

-- Sooner or later Liberals run out of other people's money.

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TheFridge

5765 posts in 952 days


#8 posted 05-04-2015 03:14 PM

Formica/melamine should be glued to sheet goods and not solid panels.

-- Shooting down the walls of heartache. Bang bang. I am. The warrior.

View JerryLH's profile

JerryLH

104 posts in 778 days


#9 posted 05-04-2015 05:15 PM


Ok, if you are going to cover it, what about the inside? Are you going to have a nice insiide face? The reason I ask is, if it s just like an island type deal, then use construction grade pine. It s cheap and will support the other material just fine. If it s formica or something that will be glued down, the mdf works great for adheasion with contact cement. If the inside is to be seen like in base cabinets, then I d go prefinished ply. If you must and I mean must have HW, then poplar is stable and will be reasonable in cost still. Great paint grade, and can be finished with dye if you know what you are doing.

Again, if you are building a shell I d not sink HW under it. But that s me.

- bonesbr549

Thanks so much – that sounds just like what I am looking for. Hardwood is ‘not’ a requirement. Construction grade pine sounds like what I need – i.e. wrapping a leg or rail (or similar component) in copper sheeting.

Thanks to all.

-- Develop your character -- for it becomes your destiny. Jerry - Mannford, Ok

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