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How would you create a cone/horn shape?

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Forum topic by scottyeyre posted 05-02-2015 11:30 AM 1488 views 0 times favorited 34 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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scottyeyre

35 posts in 1509 days


05-02-2015 11:30 AM

Topic tags/keywords: question tip trick drill press spindle moulder shaping

I saw these speakers online and was instantly blown away by the design and instantly curious how to create a similar shape. for the smaller tweeter receded into a cove.

I can see that the timber has been ripped down the center and joined back together, So perhaps creating the cove shape in 2 parts possibly. If its CNC then it would be simple, Otherwise perhaps its done with a spindle moulder? On the extreme side of things it could be possible to have a custom shape forstner style bit to cut the shape out??? Probably not though.

For now I’m just curious in expanding my knowledge of techniques, as I am a cabinetmaker apprentice in my second year. Im working for a small company that does 90% custom commissioned work using recycled rimu.

The company has a spindle moulder however, can you make custom cutters for them?

Regards
Scott Eyre


34 replies so far

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scottyeyre

35 posts in 1509 days


#1 posted 05-02-2015 11:42 AM

Perhaps a 2 stage router process using something like this?

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bbasiaga

754 posts in 1455 days


#2 posted 05-02-2015 11:51 AM

Given that the grain is no longer straight, could it be that the wood was steam bent over a mold?

-Brian

-- Part of engineering is to know when to put your calculator down and pick up your tools.

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scottyeyre

35 posts in 1509 days


#3 posted 05-02-2015 12:00 PM

Ahh. good spotting. Could be onto something with that

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scottyeyre

35 posts in 1509 days


#4 posted 05-02-2015 12:13 PM

Also if I made a panto-router, a copy carver you could turn the shape on a smaller board, then copy carve it into the speaker tower

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bondogaposis

4020 posts in 1811 days


#5 posted 05-02-2015 12:15 PM

It could be done on a lathe easily, if you had enough swing clearance.

-- Bondo Gaposis

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scottyeyre

35 posts in 1509 days


#6 posted 05-02-2015 12:31 PM

Mount the whole entire board?

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scottyeyre

35 posts in 1509 days


#7 posted 05-02-2015 12:31 PM

I guess you could cut it into two parts then align the grain and glue it back together

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JoeinGa

7472 posts in 1466 days


#8 posted 05-02-2015 12:31 PM

I think the grain is still straight. It’s an “optical delusion” because of the cone shape being cut out.
.
Edit ** I also think it looks like it could have been a 4X4 or maybe even a 6X6 that was split in half, then hollowed out. The cone and the recess for the lower speaker was cut into both halves, and reassembled.

-- Perform A Random Act Of Kindness Today ... Pay It Forward

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knotscott

7207 posts in 2835 days


#9 posted 05-02-2015 12:39 PM

Dunno about how to cut the cone, but I can’t help wonder what it does to the sound of the tweeter….most dome tweeters like that weren’t designed with a cone in mind, so it’d likely effect many aspects of the output of the tweeter.

-- Happiness is like wetting your pants...everyone can see it, but only you can feel the warmth....

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scottyeyre

35 posts in 1509 days


#10 posted 05-02-2015 12:42 PM

Aesthetically it looks amazing, sound wise I’m not sure. They are supposed to sound amazing. Ive researched speaker design a while ago, It was interesting and still want to make my own speaker cabinets sometime too.

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B4B

129 posts in 818 days


#11 posted 05-02-2015 06:30 PM

Are these mass produced or were these a one off pair? If they are a one off they could have been hand carved.

-- There's two routers in my vocab, one that moves data and one that removes wood, the latter being more relevant on this forum.

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bbasiaga

754 posts in 1455 days


#12 posted 05-02-2015 06:42 PM

There is long grain running vertically to the start of the cone on both halves. In the middle of the cone the same grain now meets the other side end grain. Could be an optical illusion I suppose ,but I don’t think so.

BTW, the dress was blue and black. :)

-Brian

-- Part of engineering is to know when to put your calculator down and pick up your tools.

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Ghidrah

667 posts in 682 days


#13 posted 05-02-2015 07:55 PM

Looks like reclaimed Fir to me, I’m having a hard time seeing how it would be steamed and pressed into a mold to take that shape without some major distortion. Some woods avail themselves to steaming, I’ve seen trick toys where only steaming allowed the trick to work. The object looks solid from the sides, if so then I don’t think it would perform as a resonating box and Fir may not be the most appropriate materials for a resonator.

-- I meant to do that!

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scottyeyre

35 posts in 1509 days


#14 posted 05-02-2015 09:01 PM

They look like they could be a limited small batch, not certain though. I think they have access to a cnc carver.

the wood is Heart Pine apparently

https://www.fernandroby.com/products/details/the-beam-tower-speakers

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Kazooman

623 posts in 1412 days


#15 posted 05-02-2015 09:08 PM

Still thinking about how they made the cone (other than CNC) but the additional pictures help. The one in the lower right hand corner shows the cabinet looking down from about a 45 degree angle relative to the front. You can see how the pieces were glued up. It explains the grain pattern in the cone. Not an optical illusion, just the result of the unusual cone shape and the concentric rings wrapping around the pieces of stock.

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