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Forum topic by TomFran posted 2512 days ago 2733 views 1 time favorited 36 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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TomFran

2940 posts in 2592 days


2512 days ago

Topic tags/keywords: saw blades freud woodworker ii rip blade

Hello Friends,

I’m getting ready to buy some quality saw blades for my table saw. My question is this, if you could only buy (3) blades to do everything you needed to do on your table saw, which saw blades would you buy?

Some examples might be this Freud Glue Line for smooth ripping:

This Forrest Woodworker II blade for smooth cross cutting and ripping:

In another thread, the Freud 40 tooth thin kerf blade was highly recommended:

And what about a blade for cutting melamine or plywood?

Don’t forget, you only get to have (3) blades. What three would you buy?

-- Tom, Surfside Beach, SC - Romans 8:28


36 replies so far

View Woodminer's profile

Woodminer

69 posts in 2535 days


#1 posted 2511 days ago

Definitely the WW2. For me, it is the “don’t leave the home show without it” product.

Everything else has to depend on what it is you plan to do with your 3 blades. If you ask me what vehicle I want and don’t tell me that I’ll only be driving in the swamps or in the deserts, I’m going to be in trouble if I ask for a limo, right?

If you do a lot of plywood work or laminate work, yeah, you need to include that in your equasion. If you do nearly all smooth ripping and crosscut work, do you need more than 2? 8^) Is one of them for a chopsaw? Are you talking about a 10 or 12” machine??

Tell us more of what you want to do with these 3 blades.

-- Dean, Missouri

View mot's profile

mot

4911 posts in 2634 days


#2 posted 2511 days ago

Well, here’s the three I’d buy…

2 x Forrest WWII Blades…one is always sharp
1 x Melamine Blade

I may be coerced into trading one of the WWII’s for the Freud Glue Line Rip. However, I have that with my jointer.

I have 2 WWII’s and that melamine blade and am very happy with that combination.

Cheers!

-- You can discover more about a person in an hour of play than in a year of conversation. (Plato)

View cajunpen's profile

cajunpen

14363 posts in 2663 days


#3 posted 2511 days ago

For my 2 cents, I use the WWII blades for almost everything that I cut (wood that is). I have just recently acquired the Freud Thin Kerf blade and am impressed with it. That one will be for certain rips, and for any resawing that I may feel is safe to do on the TS. For any cuts in Melamine, MDF, etc. I use the Bosch blade that came with my TS.

I agree with Mot and Dean – that third blade you talk about would be dependent on the particular material you want to cut.

Personally I think the WWII will handle anything wood that you ever wanted to cut (assuming that you TS’s power is up to the task).

-- Bill - "Suit yourself and let the rest be pleased." http://www.cajunpen.com/

View Lee A. Jesberger's profile

Lee A. Jesberger

6646 posts in 2577 days


#4 posted 2511 days ago

Hi Tom;

Mot hit it right on the head. You can buy cheaper, but not better. Some of the cheaper blades start out great, but dull quickly.

Forrest’s Duraline Hi AT blade, designed for melamine, is what we use for cutting furniture grade plywood, veneer covered sheets, and melamine with perfect results on both side of the sheet.

If I were to change anything about Mots’ choice, I would get one regular WW2, and one WW2 thin kerf. The standard blades stand up to heavy duty use for a longer period of time. Ripping thick lumber for example.

I would also always have Forrest sharpen any brand of blade.

If you are considering a dado set, their’s is the best as well.

Believe me, I have tried about every blade out there, and Forrest really is the best!

Lee

LJ the LJ

-- by Lee A. Jesberger http://www.prowoodworkingtips.com http://www.ezee-feed.com

View Karson's profile

Karson

34853 posts in 2998 days


#5 posted 2511 days ago

I don’t own a Forrest blade, because my saw won’t accept them but I’ve used one at the toy workshop and it’s a great blade.

-- I've been blessed with a father who liked to tinker in wood, and a wife who lets me tinker in wood. Southern Delaware karson_morrison@bigfoot.com †

View Hawgnutz's profile

Hawgnutz

526 posts in 2674 days


#6 posted 2511 days ago

Thanks, Lee.
I appreciate quality blades, like sirloin, but with my round steak budget, I may never get to buy a WW II.
I use a Freud Glue line when I want to save time on glue-ups.
I have a Ridgid 50 tooth combo blade for accurate crosscutting with minimal splintering.
I use an Oldham 200-tooth malamine, plywood blade for cutting, well, melamine and plywood. If you want splinter-free plywood cuts it is well worth the time to change to this blade.

Total cost for all three: about $100.00! (I picked up the Freud Glue Line for $40.00 from Amazon when they had it on sale. The Ridgid cost $40.00, and the Oldham cost about $20.00)

I use the Ridgid about 80% of the time, and have had good results so far.

God Bless,
Hawg

-- Saving barnwood from the scrapyards

View TomFran's profile

TomFran

2940 posts in 2592 days


#7 posted 2511 days ago

Woodminer,

I have a 10” Sears saw with a 1 hp motor. As I said in my post, I’m looking for “blades to do everything you needed to do on your table saw.” In my case that would mean cutting solid wood, cabinet grade plywood, , melamine, or whatever a woodworker (non-professional) might need to cut. That’s why I thought that you might need (3) blades to do that.

I may even want to cut some treated 2×4’s someday. I thought that 3 blades might be able to get the job done. I’m sure it would be nice to have a lot more, but maybe if you bought the right (3), and if you have a limited budget, you may be able to do just fine with (3) blades.

So I guess, we get one solid vote for the Forrest Woodworker II from you.

Thanks a lot!

-- Tom, Surfside Beach, SC - Romans 8:28

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TomFran

2940 posts in 2592 days


#8 posted 2511 days ago

Mot,

Until I came to this site, I had never even heard of a Forrest blade. Lowes and Home Depot don’t sell them, and where I live, I don’t think ANY place sells them.

Where would you go to get the best price on these blades?

How much do they charge to have them resharpened?

Thanks Tom.

-- Tom, Surfside Beach, SC - Romans 8:28

View TomFran's profile

TomFran

2940 posts in 2592 days


#9 posted 2511 days ago

Bill,

So you like the Forrest WWII, but would change the blade to your Bosch if you needed to cut some cheaper material like melamine or MDF. That was one of my thoughts; that you might want to use a cheaper blade at times when cutting wood products that would dull your expensive WWII blade prematurely. I’m thinking that it would be prudent to use a less expensive blade to cut things like melamine, etc.

Thanks Bill.

-- Tom, Surfside Beach, SC - Romans 8:28

View WayneC's profile

WayneC

12249 posts in 2695 days


#10 posted 2511 days ago

Tom,

You can find a Woodworker II in the lumberJock store…

http://store.lumberjocks.com/shop.php?c=toolshardware&n=541016&i=B0000223VQ&x=Forrest_WW10407125_Woodworker_II_10_Inch_40_Tooth_ATB_125_Kerf_Saw_Blade_with_58_Inch_Arbor

Guessing Amazon will hard to beat.

-- We must guard our enthusiasm as we would our life - James Krenov

View TomFran's profile

TomFran

2940 posts in 2592 days


#11 posted 2511 days ago

Lee,

So you think that it’s worth the extra money in the long run to buy better blades. I saw your post the other day in regard to the Forrest blades and it kind of prompted this discussion.

If the concensus here is that I could buy one blade and not three, then I will be glad to need just one blade.

I am just getting back into my woodworking after several years of “dormancy,” while we were raising our children. Most of the blades that I have now aren’t even carbide tipped. That’s why I thought that I would get some “education” here on the subject.

Thanks a lot, Lee.

-- Tom, Surfside Beach, SC - Romans 8:28

View TomFran's profile

TomFran

2940 posts in 2592 days


#12 posted 2511 days ago

Karson,

Why won’t your saw accept a Forrest blade? Will mine?

-- Tom, Surfside Beach, SC - Romans 8:28

View TomFran's profile

TomFran

2940 posts in 2592 days


#13 posted 2511 days ago

Hawg,

Can you actually skip the jointer when you rip with your Freud Glue Line?

Here again is why I thought this discussion would be helpful, not only to me, but to others who needed some knowledge on table saw blades. If you could just run boards through your TS and glue them up, that would be worth having an extra blade to me.

Thanks much, Hawg.

-- Tom, Surfside Beach, SC - Romans 8:28

View TomFran's profile

TomFran

2940 posts in 2592 days


#14 posted 2511 days ago

Wayne,

So is this the WW2 that would be recommended?

”Forrest WW10407125 Woodworker II 10-Inch 40 Tooth ATB .125 Kerf Saw Blade with 5/8-Inch Arbor”

So, this 40 tooth blade will be great for ripping or crosscutting any material?

-- Tom, Surfside Beach, SC - Romans 8:28

View WayneC's profile

WayneC

12249 posts in 2695 days


#15 posted 2511 days ago

This is the thin Kerf model. I’m assuming your saw takes a 10” blade and is a contractor saw. How big is your saw moter?

There are other kerfs available. Anyone else have an opinion?

-- We must guard our enthusiasm as we would our life - James Krenov

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