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Inexpensive log sealers?

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Forum topic by RobinDobbie posted 04-29-2015 03:36 AM 1853 views 0 times favorited 16 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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RobinDobbie

133 posts in 1199 days


04-29-2015 03:36 AM

Topic tags/keywords: log lumber end sealer

With some recent violent storms in my area, there’s potential lumber just hanging out in just my yard, alone. So to prepare to process that, I’m looking for the least expensive end sealer that works, per square foot of coverage. I’ve seen a few names thrown around like Anchor Seal and Black Jack. Anchor Seal being a specially-made product manufactured by U C Coatings, and Black Jack being a brand that makes various asphalt treatments. I imagine that some of the products Black Jack sells aren’t ideal because they’re probably too thick. However, they have a couple of products in 4.75 gallon containers that cover 300-500 sq ft for between $17 and $27 at Lowes. Anchor Seal is about $90 for 5 gallons(each gallon is rated at 100 sq ft, and I’d have to order it. Some of this wood has already been on the ground, so I really want to go buy something in the next day or so to get this done. As a third option, Home Depot sells this stuff called “Latex-ite Airport Grade Driveway Filler Sealer.” It’s available in 4.75 gallon pails, rated for 350 -500 sq ft, and it’s $23.25.

So, has anyone done any side-by-side comparisons between Anchor Seal and a less expensive alternative? Or has anyone had a good experience with one of the alternatives? If so, can you tell us exactly what product it was?


16 replies so far

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upchuck

540 posts in 1129 days


#1 posted 04-29-2015 04:13 AM

Size and scale of the log is important. I helped a friend take down a mesquite tree a few years ago here in hot and dry Arizona. We bucked the tree into fireplace sized lengths and I picked a half of a dozen pieces and split them into eighths. Within two hours from when the tree was standing I had my pieces sealed with 1:2 ratio of water:yelow glue brushed on the ends. No checking of my pieces and I now have excellent chisel handle stock.
I think that size of stock and speed of application are important. All other things being equal the more moisture proof the sealant is the better. The wood will dry out. You just want it to dry slowly from the sides not rapidly from the ends to avoid checking. This way was a fast and cheap.

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MrUnix

4226 posts in 1663 days


#2 posted 04-29-2015 04:34 AM

Many people have had good luck with regular latex paint, including myself. You can even get it free sometimes from your local waste department if they recycle it. I have a buddy with a small portable sawmill and he uses different colors for each species of wood being sealed for easy identification later. YMMV.

Cheers,
Brad

-- Brad in FL - To be old and wise, you must first be young and stupid

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RobinDobbie

133 posts in 1199 days


#3 posted 04-29-2015 04:37 AM


Size and scale of the log is important. I helped a friend take down a mesquite tree a few years ago here in hot and dry Arizona. We bucked the tree into fireplace sized lengths and I picked a half of a dozen pieces and split them into eighths. Within two hours from when the tree was standing I had my pieces sealed with 1:2 ratio of water:yelow glue brushed on the ends. No checking of my pieces and I now have excellent chisel handle stock.
I think that size of stock and speed of application are important. All other things being equal the more moisture proof the sealant is the better. The wood will dry out. You just want it to dry slowly from the sides not rapidly from the ends to avoid checking. This way was a fast and cheap.

- upchuck

I can think of uses for so much of the wood, so the sizes that I’ve been thinking about applying sealers to could range from a single inch up to 16”(the size of my chain saw). I do have some Titebond 3, but that stuff’s like $35/gallon. I suppose if we added 1/3 water to the mix, the price per gallon would be $23. I’d rather just get a 4.75/5 gallon pail of something that’s ready to go, for the same-ish price.

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RobinDobbie

133 posts in 1199 days


#4 posted 04-29-2015 04:39 AM


Many people have had good luck with regular latex paint, including myself. You can even get it free sometimes from your local waste department if they recycle it. I have a buddy with a small portable sawmill and he uses different colors for each species of wood being sealed for easy identification later. YMMV.

Cheers,
Brad

- MrUnix

Latex sounds like it would work. I did skim in one thread where someone was talking about latex paint being made to breathe. Didn’t sound right, but I don’t know enough about it. It sounds like you’ve had experience, so given this is truly the cheapest option, I’ll have to try it on at least a few pieces.

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Wildwood

1886 posts in 1599 days


#5 posted 04-29-2015 11:31 AM

We know why we use end sealer, but also have to look at storage and future processing. If don’t store wood correctly after end sealing will not stop drying defects. Some products are messy to apply and big mess on saw blades when processing logs into lumber or carving or turning blanks. Cut logs longer than will actually need and keep an eye on your wood in storage!

You can use a lot of different products to end seal logs. If use alkyd resin latex paints they work fine, but could also use oil based film finish or paint too! Anchor & green wood sealers (wax emulsion) products work well too! You will see a lot of wood deck end grain sealers at the big box stores as well. Buy and use what you can afford but store it correctly and keep an eye on it!

-- Bill

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WDHLT15

1572 posts in 1940 days


#6 posted 04-29-2015 11:46 AM

I have sealed and sawn thousands of logs. Latex paint is a poor end sealer in my experience. The black jack stuff is awfully messy and once it gets on anything, it stays there. Anchorseal is superior in every way, cleans up with water, and is worth ever cent that you spend on it.

-- Danny Located in Perry, GA. Forester. Wood-Mizer LT40HD35 Sawmill. Nyle L53 Dehumidification Kiln. hamsleyhardwood.com

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RobinDobbie

133 posts in 1199 days


#7 posted 04-29-2015 12:13 PM



I have sealed and sawn thousands of logs. Latex paint is a poor end sealer in my experience. The black jack stuff is awfully messy and once it gets on anything, it stays there. Anchorseal is superior in every way, cleans up with water, and is worth ever cent that you spend on it.

- WDHLT15

Yeah, I’ve read several times since last night that latex paint is unreliable as an end sealer. Although some people say it’s worked for them. I think some of the variances could be due to there being a lot of different brands of paint used. And if we’re going for the cheapest, marked-down paint, there might not be a choice of the brand that does work consistently(if there is one). I may give it a try on a couple fireplace-bound pieces just for experimentation sake.

As far as the Black Jack stuff being messy, I wouldn’t mind that. If we know it ain’t comin’ off, that’s kinda part of what we want! lol And given the price difference(anchor seal being $18 per 100 sq ft coverage(if purchased in 5 gallon size), Black Jack and Latex-ite being about $8 per 100 sq ft, I could more than afford to throw away any brushes/rollers involved. But what seals the deal(pun intended) is that I can’t go out and buy Anchor Seal at my local home center. Whatever I buy needs to be available locally, at least for the wood I’m wanting to take care of in the next day or so.

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WoodNSawdust

1417 posts in 641 days


#8 posted 04-29-2015 03:28 PM

You also want to keep the wood off the ground as it dries and if you are located in a hot climate you might want to store the wood in the shade so it will dry slower.

-- "I love it when a plan comes together" John "Hannibal" Smith

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AZWoody

697 posts in 688 days


#9 posted 04-29-2015 03:39 PM

I use elastomeric roof sealer because I already have some on-hand from doing some roof repairs.

I’m not sure on the cost ratio compared to other products but from researching, many people have said they like it better than anchorseal and some of the other products sold as an end sealer.

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RobinDobbie

133 posts in 1199 days


#10 posted 04-29-2015 05:06 PM

Roof sealers are typically a lot thicker. First result when I searched for “elastomeric roof sealer” was $73 for a 5-gallon pail that only covered 50-75 sq ft..

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AZWoody

697 posts in 688 days


#11 posted 04-29-2015 07:09 PM



Roof sealers are typically a lot thicker. First result when I searched for “elastomeric roof sealer” was $73 for a 5-gallon pail that only covered 50-75 sq ft..

- RobinDobbie

I already had them from a leftover project so price wasn’t an issue. Being thicker, they will seal better than latex paint but, I wouldn’t rule out latex paint. Many people have had success with it. You just might need to do multiple coats and if you go to any of the big box stores, you can get returns or error cans pretty cheap.

Also, the type of tree will make a difference too. Some are check prone so you’ll want to make sure you use the higher grade sealer or really layer up on the latex.

I have done a lot of mesquite and it’s the most stable wood I have seen. I have not done any sealing and have not had problems with checking or even warping if it wasn’t weighed down. Eucalyptus, on the other hand wants to warp and check even if sealed and weighted with 700 pounds.

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Mykos

102 posts in 1259 days


#12 posted 04-29-2015 11:18 PM

I’ve always used whatever can of old junk paint was around in the paint shed at work. Put it on thick, with a few coats if necessary as soon as possible. I live on the west coast so I don’t need to worry about extreme swings in humidity though. It’s always worked fine for me using any old paint.

View gfadvm's profile

gfadvm

14940 posts in 2154 days


#13 posted 04-30-2015 12:35 AM

Anchorseal ships very quickly to me and the free shipping is a bonus! Woodcraft shows that they stock Anchorseal.

-- " I'll try to be nicer, if you'll try to be smarter" gfadvm

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fuigb

403 posts in 2422 days


#14 posted 04-30-2015 01:53 AM

News to me that latex paint is a poor choice. I’m only a hobbyist but I’ve only used the stuff on the flat and quarter-sawn boards that I’ve turned out on the bandsaw with found trees. Soft maple, sycamore, and apple mostly, and I’ve never had a check or crazy warping. I’m bracketed by great lakes, too.

-- - Crud. Go tell your mother that I need a Band-aid.

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soob

223 posts in 673 days


#15 posted 04-30-2015 04:47 AM

Wood costs so much, and a gallon of that sealant covers so much wood, it seems silly to worry too much about the price of it. Just get the anchorseal and be done with it.

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