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Forum topic by AZWoody posted 04-28-2015 12:13 AM 958 views 0 times favorited 12 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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AZWoody

693 posts in 687 days


04-28-2015 12:13 AM

I currently have an 8” steel city granite jointer and would like to get something larger.
With my sawmill, I do a lot of face jointing as well as edge jointing and 8” is turning out to be too narrow for me.

I’ve thought of upgrading to a 12” but I was wondering how much of a difference 4 more inches would make. Going to a 16” is a major, major jump in price though. What I wonder though, at that size, is it almost too large of a practical size to be using with one person? Does trying to use a 16” become too unwieldy?

I’d be interested to know what anyone with experience using them have to say about them.


12 replies so far

View pintodeluxe's profile

pintodeluxe

4854 posts in 2276 days


#1 posted 04-28-2015 06:12 AM

I think 12” would be a good size for most planks. Actually boards wider than 12” are prone to checking and warping anyways. Even if you had a 16” jointer you would likely rip them down to more manageable size before jointing.

I use an 8” jointer, because most of the quartersawn oak boards I encounter are 5-8” wide.

-- Willie, Washington "If You Choose Not To Decide, You Still Have Made a Choice" - Rush

View Texcaster's profile

Texcaster

1138 posts in 1137 days


#2 posted 04-28-2015 08:03 AM

The real value of a large machine is being able to dress glued up panels. I have a 400mm or 16in over and under, almost perfect for most bits of furniture. Example, a door or framed cab. side with a 16in panel and 2 1/2 in stiles is a wide panel. Most of my cases have been sub 16in. For larger work, two dressed halves are joined.

-- Mama calls me Texcaster but my real name is Mr. Earl.

View bigblockyeti's profile

bigblockyeti

3668 posts in 1184 days


#3 posted 04-28-2015 12:32 PM

We had a 16” jointer where I used to work and it was great for cleaning up custom glue laminated beams. We did have a chainfall overhead to handle the beams which in some cases were over a ton. I was at least a two person job, especially with the larger ones we made.

View AlaskaGuy's profile

AlaskaGuy

2406 posts in 1772 days


#4 posted 04-28-2015 12:36 PM



The real value of a large machine is being able to dress glued up panels. I have a 400mm or 16in over and under, almost perfect for most bits of furniture. Example, a door or framed cab. side with a 16in panel and 2 1/2 in stiles is a wide panel. Most of my cases have been sub 16in. For larger work, two dressed halves are joined.

- Texcaster


+1

I too have a 16” J/P. Even at that I sometimes wished I had got the 24’’ but never wished I had smaller.

-- Alaskan's for Global warming!

View Kaleb the Swede's profile

Kaleb the Swede

1727 posts in 1432 days


#5 posted 04-28-2015 01:25 PM

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=y0335X42KRs

This guy is has an even bigger jointer planer. 25 inches to be exact. If you watch the video it doesn’t seem too unwieldy for him.

I wish…..with my little bench top 6 inch jointer..sigh. Best of luck to you

-- Just trying to build something beautiful

View jdh122's profile

jdh122

879 posts in 2281 days


#6 posted 04-28-2015 01:41 PM

I thought there were double-sided planers that can both joint and plane at the same time. The biggest ones are for industrial-size sawmills, but are there no smaller ones that might be more reasonable (especially given how much 16’ jointers cost). Or maybe I’m totally off-base?

-- Jeremy, in the Acadian forests

View SirIrb's profile

SirIrb

1239 posts in 694 days


#7 posted 04-28-2015 01:50 PM

This!
I want pictures and stories.
This is a must.


We had a 16” jointer where I used to work and it was great for cleaning up custom glue laminated beams. We did have a chainfall overhead to handle the beams which in some cases were over a ton. I was at least a two person job, especially with the larger ones we made.

- bigblockyeti


-- Don't blame me, I voted for no one.

View AZWoody's profile

AZWoody

693 posts in 687 days


#8 posted 04-28-2015 03:56 PM

That 25” planer would be awesome to have.

Anybody use the 16” combos? The one thing that always makes me think twice is the short length of the tables

View WoodNSawdust's profile

WoodNSawdust

1417 posts in 639 days


#9 posted 04-28-2015 04:13 PM



I currently have an 8” steel city granite jointer and would like to get something larger.
With my sawmill, I do a lot of face jointing as well as edge jointing and 8” is turning out to be too narrow for me.

The real question is how wide are the logs you run through your sawmill. If you are milling rough boards that are always under 12” then a 12” jointer will be sufficient. If you regularly saw boards between 12 and 16” then you have your answer.

For an occasional board you could use a planer sled to join the first face if your planer is wide enough.

-- "I love it when a plan comes together" John "Hannibal" Smith

View AZWoody's profile

AZWoody

693 posts in 687 days


#10 posted 04-28-2015 04:33 PM


I currently have an 8” steel city granite jointer and would like to get something larger.
With my sawmill, I do a lot of face jointing as well as edge jointing and 8” is turning out to be too narrow for me.

The real question is how wide are the logs you run through your sawmill. If you are milling rough boards that are always under 12” then a 12” jointer will be sufficient. If you regularly saw boards between 12 and 16” then you have your answer.

For an occasional board you could use a planer sled to join the first face if your planer is wide enough.

- WoodNSawdust

Boards vary from 4 inches on up to 24 inch slabs. I do have a 20” planer that I can do a sled but at that size, it gets pretty heavy and will need help which I can get from time to time.

I might have to go with a 12” unless I can find a 16” that I can find a price that’s not double the 12, which is what I’m finding for the most part.

View AlaskaGuy's profile

AlaskaGuy

2406 posts in 1772 days


#11 posted 04-29-2015 11:52 AM



I think 12” would be a good size for most planks. Actually boards wider than 12” are prone to checking and warping anyways. Even if you had a 16” jointer you would likely rip them down to more manageable size before jointing.

I use an 8” jointer, because most of the quartersawn oak boards I encounter are 5-8” wide.

- pintodeluxe


It’s seems like not many realize the advantages of gluing 2 or 3 of those 5-8’’ wide boards together before you face joint. When I need a glued up panel for cabinet doors I’ll do just that then flatten the whole mess as one board and then thur the planer.

I see lots of post where people have trouble getting their glue ups perfect aligned. This eliminates this problem.
Wide jointer can be very useful even you only have stock the 5-8’’ wide.

-- Alaskan's for Global warming!

View gfadvm's profile

gfadvm

14940 posts in 2153 days


#12 posted 04-30-2015 12:29 AM

The huge advantage to a big (24-25” jointer) is you can skew/angle the board and have less tear out as well as being able to joint wide stock. I troll CL daily looking for a BIG jointer!

-- " I'll try to be nicer, if you'll try to be smarter" gfadvm

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