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DINING TABLE DESIGN - TABLE BASE DIMENSIONS??

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Forum topic by SKlaus posted 04-28-2015 12:07 AM 853 views 0 times favorited 12 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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SKlaus

52 posts in 1856 days


04-28-2015 12:07 AM

Topic tags/keywords: table pedestal base design size dimension dining hydrant fire bar top epoxy finish bar top epoxy finish

Good Evening everyone, I have just started the process of designing by far my largest project to date. The boys at the station have mentioned building an “heirloom” dining table to replace the cheap standard issue melamine ones we have. I jumped at the opportunity to design something and build it, and place our mark for future generations of firefighters at that station, so here I am.

Just some background, The table top will be one solid unit, measuring over 15 feet x 3 ft x 2.5 inches. It will be finished in bar top epoxy, with an inset label in the center. I estimate that it will weigh in excess of 600- 700 lbs. I will be building the base of the top with double thick laminated 3/4” plywood with 12 foot runners under it to withstand the flex that the top would experience, especially during transport. Dont worry… we have a 20 foot trailer, and 20 strapping young lads (at least at shift change) to move the piece into place in the dining room.

I will be using 2 hydrants, one at each end as supports for the beast. followed by 2 more middle supports between. the 2 hydrants will sit on a cross/spider pedestal made with 3-4” stock and the middle supports will be simple T design and used as helpers.

My question is how wide should the cross/spider be to support such a large, heavy and very precarious table? obviously Im not worried about it tipping end to end. But side to side is a very different story.
The hydrants will help keep the center of gravity low, as they weight 70+ pounds each themselves, but that wont be enough to overcome poor design.

If anyone has any ideas, I am all ears!! Thanks ahead of Time!!

-- 2 Timothy 2:15 "Be diligent to present yourself approved to God, a worker who does not need to be ashamed, rightly dividing the word of truth."


12 replies so far

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SKlaus

52 posts in 1856 days


#1 posted 04-28-2015 10:19 PM

Bump…

-- 2 Timothy 2:15 "Be diligent to present yourself approved to God, a worker who does not need to be ashamed, rightly dividing the word of truth."

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AandCstyle

2575 posts in 1724 days


#2 posted 04-28-2015 11:29 PM

SKlaus, lag screw (into a joist) the hydrants to the floor and the table will never tip over. FWIW

-- Art

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Beams37

163 posts in 657 days


#3 posted 04-29-2015 01:36 AM

I just want to see pictures when it’s done. I have no real information to add. God speed !!

-- FNG ... On a quest for knowledge.

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SKlaus

52 posts in 1856 days


#4 posted 04-29-2015 02:42 AM

That would be the best idea wouldn’t it?? However due to the paramilitary nature of our profession, things need to be mobile for deep cleaning days. The other thing is the floor is solid terrazzo which is a poured surface. I’m not sure the city of Miami would appreciate me using a hammer drill and placing 3/8” tap-cons in the floor. Hence why it needs to be mobile, albeit “Mobil” is a loosely used word here…. It’ll be an “all hands” event to move it for sure…

-- 2 Timothy 2:15 "Be diligent to present yourself approved to God, a worker who does not need to be ashamed, rightly dividing the word of truth."

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SKlaus

52 posts in 1856 days


#5 posted 04-29-2015 02:47 AM

And for sure there will be pictures!! No timeline at this point… It’s going to be a chore to get 30 guys to pony up 50 bucks or so for the job… And a pre-disclosure… I’ll only post photos if I’m successful in the endeavor!! If I’m not, I’ll at least come back and try to tell you where I went wrong, what I learned, tuck my tail between my legs and carry on…

-- 2 Timothy 2:15 "Be diligent to present yourself approved to God, a worker who does not need to be ashamed, rightly dividing the word of truth."

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MT_Stringer

2854 posts in 2698 days


#6 posted 04-29-2015 02:57 AM

I am curious. Why does the top have to be so thick?
Have you drawn plans for this project. Surely that would be a big help.

Are you going to build it on site or in your shop? I hope your shop is a big one. :-)
I also would like to see construction pics.
Mike

-- Handcrafted by Mike Henderson - Channelview, Texas

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SKlaus

52 posts in 1856 days


#7 posted 04-29-2015 02:11 PM

Im in the process of drawing it up now. But I have figured that the top is going to be quite thick. it will be 3/4” plywood doubled and spiced together to give a firm base, then they want the top to have a “bowling alley” look to it so it will have a series of 1×2 “flooring planks” that will not be structural to the top, followed by what Im figuring is going to be a 3/8 inch inset from the top of the apron to the top of the planks to allow space for a seal and whatever other items they want to put in there. The only thing I can think to do to keep it thinner is to rip the 1×2 planks down to say 3/8 inch or maybe even 1/4 inch since they wont be structural anyways. that would give me a grand total of 2 1/8 – 2 1/4” top. thats a little better than what I had been planning… Thanks for forcing me to think a little harder!! :)

It is still going to need a substantial support hence why Im curious about the dimensions of the pedestal, and yes it will push the outer limits of my shop capability. my shop is 20 by 20 and the table is 15 feet long. (not in a basement either). my tools are on wheels so that helps, but Im going to have to make all of my long rips before I start any assembly.

-- 2 Timothy 2:15 "Be diligent to present yourself approved to God, a worker who does not need to be ashamed, rightly dividing the word of truth."

View JKMDETAIL's profile

JKMDETAIL

172 posts in 1122 days


#8 posted 04-29-2015 05:25 PM

A pretty big job. Like many other I anticipate picture. I do have a small concern about weight and the type floor it will be sitting on. Is it possible the concentrated weight could damage the floor. I would say you need to spread your support to about 2/3’s the table width.

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MT_Stringer

2854 posts in 2698 days


#9 posted 04-29-2015 06:11 PM

Still thinking for ya…
What if you used 1/2 inch plywood? That would yield a 1 inch thick base, saving you a 1/2 inch of thickness.

What material are you going to use for the top? You said 1×2’s. Are those laid flat? That is what my dining table looks like. Kinda like laying a hardwood floor. You will certainly need good sharp edges and cross cuts.
Will those pieces be glued or nailed to the plywood base?

Whew. Certainly a big project, indeed.

-- Handcrafted by Mike Henderson - Channelview, Texas

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SKlaus

52 posts in 1856 days


#10 posted 04-29-2015 07:34 PM

The floor Im not to concerned about. I believe the terrazzo is poured over reinforced concrete. plus the nature of terrazzo being a mixture of solid stones mixed into a medium, then poured, ground down and polished makes it a very very durable surface. Its a very common surface here in south florida in homes made in the 60s and 70’s. I know how hard it is, Ive hit my head on it plenty of times as a kid!!

Besides that I am going to splay the weight with 2 middle trestles, so figure that 600lb number divided by 4… shouldnt be a problem.

I was thinking 2/3’s myself. I was thinking, just by “eyeing it up” that anything under 20” would be problematic.

as far as the 1/2 plywood idea… that is interesting… would lighten it up, reduce dimension, and save a bundle on cash and boy is plywood expensive now!! I just went today and priced it out… 3/4” #2 common chinese birch is 50 bucks a sheet down here!! however, do you think that there will be enough rigidity with 1/2 laminated? That was my question.

the planks I’ll use some 8/4 stock and rip it thin to about 1/4” to 3/8” and using glue almost as a thin set as you would in tile. They wont be structural, it will be more of a “faux” flooring look, followed by the bar top finish. Im not terribly worried about the crosscuts…they want a bit of a “rustic” feel to it, so if theres some gaps (under a 1/16”) between the planks, and they arent perfectly square to each other, so be it…

-- 2 Timothy 2:15 "Be diligent to present yourself approved to God, a worker who does not need to be ashamed, rightly dividing the word of truth."

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SKlaus

52 posts in 1856 days


#11 posted 04-29-2015 07:40 PM

Once again, thanks so much for all your input, and making me think a little harder.. Keep it coming!! I definetley could use it..

by the way, has anyone used bar top epoxy before? can you do it in coats? as an example, if there is a 1/2” inset, can you pour a 1/4” layer, let it harden, place your knick knacks and then pour again to cover over?

Reason I ask is because the emblem will likely just be a sticker.. so if i lay the emblem directly on the wood, Im worried the weight of the epoxy will cause the emblem to crease into the gaps of the flooring planks thereby showing through the finish.

-- 2 Timothy 2:15 "Be diligent to present yourself approved to God, a worker who does not need to be ashamed, rightly dividing the word of truth."

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SKlaus

52 posts in 1856 days


#12 posted 04-29-2015 10:13 PM

Another question. I was looking at cypress today. Anyone have any experience with it? I would like to use it as the trestle and spider supports for the hydrants. But I know its a light weight wood and isnt very hard, probably similar to poplar, but its just beautiful especially the rift and quarter sawn lengths. It has beautiful cathedraling in the flat sawn sections and I can get it for under 4 bucks a foot!! which would make the boys at the station happy!! would anyone advise against this?

-- 2 Timothy 2:15 "Be diligent to present yourself approved to God, a worker who does not need to be ashamed, rightly dividing the word of truth."

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