LumberJocks

What tips do you have for a new woodworker?

  • Advertise with us

« back to Woodworking Skill Share forum

Forum topic by Sanderguy777 posted 04-27-2015 08:16 PM 1256 views 0 times favorited 18 replies Add to Favorites Watch
View Sanderguy777's profile

Sanderguy777

158 posts in 666 days


04-27-2015 08:16 PM

Topic tags/keywords: tip question trick resource miter saw joining

I am in a lull in my woodworking, so I think this is a good time for me to ask for newbie tips. Over the last few years, I have made tables, foot stools, MORE tables. I love building tables, but I need some tips on how to make them stronger and more stable. The last one I made, I glued the legs on. Boy, did that help! So far I just put an apron or board on the bottom of the table top and screw the legs to that and the table top. On the most complicated one, I had the legs compound beveled out at a 5 degree angle, it looks really good and is really strong.

Basically, I want tips you would give a newbie on mortise and tenon, dove tail, and other techniques.

Thanks

P.S. I need tips on sharpening hand saws with a file. I can’t take it to a pro, and I’d rather not have to buy a new saw.


18 replies so far

View Ghidrah's profile

Ghidrah

667 posts in 686 days


#1 posted 04-27-2015 08:44 PM

I know how you feel, I also go through lulls, if I were to stand back and HMMMM, it almost seem like a bi-polar thing. Last fall I was going from one project to another and most of it was techniques I never tried before. I got back into scroll sawing too. Then nothing from mid Jan on. I began scratching on the note pads last week and came up with 2 ideas for some clocks. I finished scaling both last night and left the pages at Staples for 6 dupes.

Once I get the house’s gable trim replaced, the porch reroofed and some sidewall repair, and the shop cleaned and the gardens ready I’m good to go.

-- I meant to do that!

View JayT's profile (online now)

JayT

4783 posts in 1675 days


#2 posted 04-27-2015 08:56 PM


P.S. I need tips on sharpening hand saws with a file. I can t take it to a pro, and I d rather not have to buy a new saw.

- Sanderguy777

Watch this video, then practice, then watch the video again. Lather, rinse and repeat until satisfied. There is so much info in there that I have to take it in small chunks and process before trying to digest more.

-- "Good judgement is the result of experience. A lot of experience is the result of poor judgement."

View ic3ss's profile

ic3ss

387 posts in 2241 days


#3 posted 04-27-2015 09:52 PM

Here’s a tip: Get out while you can, it’s addictive.

-- "I am endeavoring, ma'am, to construct a mnemonic memory circuit using stone knives and bear skins."

View woodbutcherbynight's profile

woodbutcherbynight

2435 posts in 1873 days


#4 posted 04-28-2015 01:21 AM



Here s a tip: Get out while you can, it s addictive.

- ic3ss

(LAUGHING)

-- Live to tell the stories, they sound better that way.

View Sanderguy777's profile

Sanderguy777

158 posts in 666 days


#5 posted 04-28-2015 04:38 AM

I just thought that I build a tortilla press. Will pine work? What finish? Boiled linseed or Mineral oil?

JayT I like your signature.

View Jake's profile

Jake

850 posts in 1095 days


#6 posted 04-28-2015 06:58 AM


I just thought that I build a tortilla press. Will pine work? What finish? Boiled linseed or Mineral oil?

JayT I like your signature.

- Sanderguy777


If you are in a lull, take on tehniques and finishes that you haven’t used before. And just jump into them head first, all guns blazing. That’s what I do. I take on a huge project and figure it out as I go. Sure initially the project takes a long time, but taking it one small step at a time it’ll get done in the end. So I’d say that instead of doing the tortilla press, make a tea box (Matt cremona has great videos up about it) You’ll get to make a lot of dovetailed drawers and other stuff that you otherwise wouldn’t tackle.

-- Measure twice, cut once, cut again for good measure.

View Sanderguy777's profile

Sanderguy777

158 posts in 666 days


#7 posted 04-28-2015 07:18 AM

Looks good. I’ll try it. Thanks

View artsyfartsy's profile

artsyfartsy

646 posts in 623 days


#8 posted 04-28-2015 01:44 PM

Sanderguy, do you subscribe to any woodworker publications? If not, you should. There are lots of ideas and suggestions in those. I subscribe to one in particular, not so much as a “how to” magazine, but to inspire ideas. Get the inspirational juices flowing, so to speak. I look forward to my monthly fix. If you send me your address, I’ll send you an extra one that I have, just to give you some ideas.

Catch u later.

-- DWelch. Michigan, The only dumb question is the one not asked!

View rwe2156's profile

rwe2156

2194 posts in 945 days


#9 posted 04-28-2015 01:45 PM



Basically, I want tips you would give a newbie on mortise and tenon, dove tail, and other techniques.

For any joinery techniques, you really need to watch a video or two. Personally, I’m a big fan Frank Klausz because he is very practical in his teaching. He’s got a good video on Joinery you can buy through Fine WW’ing.

The first thing you need to do is decide on machine, hand or a combination of both.
There are many ways to do M/T’s but these I find helpful for me:

1: always cut the mortises first and size tenons to fit.
2: its better to oversize the tenons just a bit and sneak up on a perfect fit.
3: you’ve got to learn how to lay them out before you can do anything.
4: you’ve got to have a decent set of basic tools if you’re doing them by hand.

Ways to cut mortises:
1. Router.
2. Power mortiser.
3. Drill press and chisel.
4. By hand with mortising chisel.

Tenons:
1. By hand. You’ll need a good quality tenon saw and a shoulder or rabbet plane.
2. Tenon jig on TS.
3. Dado on TS.
4. Bandsaw.

No matter how you do it, always over size the tenons a bit and sneak up on a perfect fit with a rabbet plane, shoulder plane, or joinery float.

I need tips on sharpening hand saws with a file. I can t take it to a pro, and I d rather not have to buy a new saw.

- Sanderguy777

Its not that hard to learn. Paul Sellers has a good video and there’s lots of others on YouTube.
You’ll need a saw vice and a tooth set and make sure you use the right file for the TPI or you’ll mess up your saw real quick. (now how do I know that?)

Sorry for the length my last piece of advice is (for me) when I moved away from “off the machine” joinery and learned how to fine tune with hand tools the quality of my joinery improved immensely.

Dovetails are a whoooole ‘nother post.

Good luck.

-- Everything is a prototype thats why its one of a kind!!

View helluvawreck's profile

helluvawreck

23175 posts in 2331 days


#10 posted 04-28-2015 02:03 PM

Don’t quit. You’ll always regret it. Go the hand tool rout at first to learn and save money too. Then acquire the portable power tools one by one and finally acquire the stationary power tools one by one. This way you won’t break the pocket book and you’ll learn a whole lot. You’ll eventually end up with a nice shop. A great starting shop is just a small storage shed with a small shed roof that is attached to keep the rain and sun off of you. The shed is good enough to store your tools. The shed roof will give you a little more room to work in and later you can enclose it as well. I was fortunate to have an open carport and I had an old wardrobe to store my tools in. It wasn’t till I was in my fifties that I finally closed in the carport and got my first stationary power tools. Lately I have recently been blessed enough to build my dream shop. You might say that my present shop has been in the making for forty five years. I still have the first set of hand tools that I started with and paid $1000 for them which was a lot of money back then. However, I bought very nice tools so it didn’t go as far as you might think. Best of wishes to you as you go along. Enjoy yourself.

helluvawreck aka Charles
http://woodworkingexpo.wordpress.com

-- If a man does not keep pace with his companions, perhaps it is because he hears a different drummer. Let him step to the music which he hears, however measured or far away. Henry David Thoreau

View Sanderguy777's profile

Sanderguy777

158 posts in 666 days


#11 posted 04-28-2015 07:40 PM

Artsy You forget that I live in Tonga. There are literally no addresses and to send a magazine would take at least $10 shipping and a month or two of waiting for the post office t get it here. Thanks for the offer though.

Charles I’m not quitting. I have the basic tools, I just need the specific tools for this facet of the learning curve.

View davewilson's profile

davewilson

7 posts in 620 days


#12 posted 04-28-2015 08:38 PM



Sanderguy, do you subscribe to any woodworker publications? If not, you should.

Could you name any of them? I’m also looking for sources of new tips and inspiration. I’d be grateful for any suggestions.

View exelectrician's profile

exelectrician

2327 posts in 1892 days


#13 posted 04-29-2015 02:26 AM

When I have a lull I sharpen my hand planes – Pretty soon I am testing the sharpness,,, viola! a project starts right under the blade!

-- Love thy neighbour as thyself

View Sanderguy777's profile

Sanderguy777

158 posts in 666 days


#14 posted 04-29-2015 09:17 AM

exelectrician I sure need to do that. I might also sharpen my chisels. Thanks for that.

View artsyfartsy's profile

artsyfartsy

646 posts in 623 days


#15 posted 04-29-2015 01:52 PM

Sanderguy, maybe I need to move where you’re at, then my bills will never catch up to me. LOL. Oh well, I tried. It’s funny, this latest magazine I just got yesterday has an article about wood glues. Remember that one?

Catch u later.

-- DWelch. Michigan, The only dumb question is the one not asked!

showing 1 through 15 of 18 replies

Have your say...

You must be signed in to reply.

DISCLAIMER: Any posts on LJ are posted by individuals acting in their own right and do not necessarily reflect the views of LJ. LJ will not be held liable for the actions of any user.

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

HomeRefurbers.com