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Rose of sharon

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Forum topic by Don Butler posted 04-27-2015 05:01 PM 1102 views 0 times favorited 11 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Don Butler

1086 posts in 2862 days


04-27-2015 05:01 PM

Has anybody used the wood of the Rose of Sharon bush? I know it’s not properly a tree but the trunk can get pretty big and the wood is the whitest I’ve ever seen. I cut a ten year old specimen down and wondered if this wood might be used for making stringing or something.

DB

-- No trees were damaged in posting this message, but thousands of electrons were seriously inconvenienced.


11 replies so far

View distrbd's profile

distrbd

2228 posts in 1913 days


#1 posted 04-27-2015 07:33 PM

Wow, learned something new Today, look at this bench:

http://www.zolligirl.com/?m=200905

-- Ken from Ontario, Canada

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Don Butler

1086 posts in 2862 days


#2 posted 04-27-2015 07:55 PM

Ken,
Is that rose of sharon?

db

-- No trees were damaged in posting this message, but thousands of electrons were seriously inconvenienced.

View tinnman65's profile

tinnman65

1300 posts in 2881 days


#3 posted 04-27-2015 08:48 PM

I would dry it out and see if it dries out well, we all use holly for inlay and that’s not really a tree.

-- Paul--- Creativity is allowing yourself to make mistakes. Art is knowing which ones to keep. — Scott Adams

View Ghidrah's profile

Ghidrah

667 posts in 689 days


#4 posted 04-27-2015 09:13 PM

That pic takes Bonsai to a new level yeah!

I’ve done some inlay and as of yet have been using maple, it has drawbacks but for gradual curves it works, the only issue I have is it looks a little orange under Tung oil. If Holly isn’t a tree you could fool me with the 20 something foot high hollies we have in our area.

-- I meant to do that!

View distrbd's profile

distrbd

2228 posts in 1913 days


#5 posted 04-27-2015 10:26 PM


Ken,
Is that rose of sharon?

db

- Don “Dances with Wood” Butler


It looks like it, the link in post one gave me the impression that the man in the picture trained a that rose or sharon bush to look the way it does:

I thought it was cool. Probably because I can’t find the time to give my plants water, much less mold them into interesting shapes. I’m a bad plant owner! And just as I was feeling that PERHAPS I could coax my Rose of Sharon into something less like a bush.

-- Ken from Ontario, Canada

View MrUnix's profile

MrUnix

4244 posts in 1666 days


#6 posted 04-27-2015 10:41 PM

Rose of Sharon is a member of the Hibiscus family (Hibiscus syriacus), which are typically shrubs and short trees. Also known as the Chinese Hibiscus or China Rose Hibiscus IIRC. I’m not sure how similar it is to the more common Hibiscus plants used for landscaping down here in Florida, but here is a link to it’s (Hibiscus lasiococcus) woodworking properties over at the Wood Workers Source site:
http://www.woodworkerssource.com/show_properties.php?wood=Hibiscus%20lasiococcus

Looks like it would be a nice wood to work with.

Cheers,
Brad

-- Brad in FL - To be old and wise, you must first be young and stupid

View leafherder's profile

leafherder

897 posts in 1419 days


#7 posted 04-27-2015 11:08 PM

I agree with tinnman65, let it dry and give it a try. That is how I started using shrub honeysuckle wood (which has a beautiful natural golden color) and wood from my Rugosa Rose bush. Boxwood is not a tree but it is widely used for inlay and accents. Keep us posted, (I have a lot of small Rose of Sharon seedlings popping up from the hedge my neighbors planted – you may have just given me a reason to let them grow.)

-- Leafherder

View Don Butler's profile

Don Butler

1086 posts in 2862 days


#8 posted 04-28-2015 10:41 AM

Leafherder,
Rosa rogusa is a maneater!
Big nasty thorns everywhere.
Grows like a weed.
By the way, the rose hips that form behind the blossoms are tart and swet and a great source for vitamin C!

Don

-- No trees were damaged in posting this message, but thousands of electrons were seriously inconvenienced.

View Roger's profile

Roger

19885 posts in 2271 days


#9 posted 04-28-2015 12:26 PM

I’m speechless

-- Roger from KY. Work/Play/Travel Safe. Keep your dust collector fed. Kentuk55@yahoo.com

View helluvawreck's profile

helluvawreck

23199 posts in 2333 days


#10 posted 04-28-2015 01:44 PM

That is so unusual; I suppose a type of living art. It is a thing of beauty for sure.

helluvawreck aka Charles
http://woodworkingexpo.wordpress.com

-- If a man does not keep pace with his companions, perhaps it is because he hears a different drummer. Let him step to the music which he hears, however measured or far away. Henry David Thoreau

View leafherder's profile

leafherder

897 posts in 1419 days


#11 posted 05-01-2015 11:03 PM

Yes Rosa Rugosa is prickly (to put it mildly), but also the most disease and pest resistant rose that I have ever seen in the Midwest – AND the scent is heavenly when it blooms. Wish it was easier to propagate, would love a hedge to keep the neighbors cats away from my bird feeders. Plus the wood is sturdy enough to make canes and walking sticks. :)

-- Leafherder

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